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eBook Bound Only Once: The Failure of Open Theism epub

by Douglas Wilson

eBook Bound Only Once: The Failure of Open Theism epub
  • ISBN: 1885767846
  • Author: Douglas Wilson
  • Genre: Religion
  • Subcategory: Religious Studies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canon Press (June 7, 2001)
  • Pages: 230 pages
  • ePUB size: 1201 kb
  • FB2 size 1352 kb
  • Formats rtf doc lrf mbr


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Douglas James "Doug" Wilson (born June 18, 1953) is a conservative Reformed and evangelical . -- (2001e), Wilson, Douglas (e., Bound Only Once: The Failure of Open Theism, Canon, ISBN 978-1-885767-84-4.

Douglas James "Doug" Wilson (born June 18, 1953) is a conservative Reformed and evangelical theologian, pastor at Christ Church in Moscow, Idaho, faculty member at New Saint Andrews College, and author and speaker. Wilson is well known for his controversial work Southern Slavery, As It Was, which he coauthored with League of the South co-founder Steve Wilkins. -- (2001f), Excused Absence: Should Christian Kids Leave Public Schools?, Canon, ISBN 978-702245-1-4.

Open Theists like to picture the God of classical Christian theism as a distant, despotic, micro-managing sovereign

Open Theists like to picture the God of classical Christian theism as a distant, despotic, micro-managing sovereign. The god of Open theism, on the other hand, is ready to enter into new experiences and to become deeply involved in helping us cope as we, with him, face things we simply did not know would happen. They insist that God has knowledge, but not all knowledge, certainly not knowledge of the future acts of free beings.

The Failure of Open Theism. Published June 7, 2001 by Canon Press. Bishop Warburton once said that orthodoxy "is my doxy; heterodoxy is another man's doxy.

Open theism, also called free will theism and openness theology, is the belief that God does not exercise meticulous control of the universe but leaves it. .

Open theism, also called free will theism and openness theology, is the belief that God does not exercise meticulous control of the universe but leaves it "open" for humans to make significant choices (free will) that impact their relationships with God and others. A corollary of this is that God has not predetermined the future. The Only Wise God: The Compatibility of Divine Foreknowledge and Human Freedom, by William Lane Craig.

The failure of ‘Wets’ to organise as effectively against the prohibition .

The failure of ‘Wets’ to organise as effectively against the prohibition movement was partly down to the fact that many in the beer and wine industry thought prohibition would only apply to intoxicating liquors, as was stated in an early draft of the bill in 1917. Flouting the law. Race and religion were inextricably bound up with prohibition’s enforcement, since police forces throughout the country were overwhelmingly white and included Klan sympathisers.

For other people named Douglas Wilson, see Douglas Wilson (disambiguation). He is featured in the documentary film Collision documenting his debates with anti-theist Christopher Hitchens on their promotional tour for the book "Is Christianity Good for the World?".

The problems with Open theism lie deeper than most critiques suggest. This book interacts not only with the truth claims of Open theism but also its distorted aesthetic and ethical assumptions that do so much work in that program. Open theists characterize the God of classical Christian theism as a distant, despotic, micromanaging, petty, Mr. Burns sovereign, with little time for nonsense or tissues. They depict the god of Open theism as a nineties sort of guy, ready to enter into new experiences, feel our pain, and link pinkies into an unknown future.


Open theists insist that God has knowledge, but not all knowledge, certainly not knowledge of the future acts of free beings and some statues. Such Open theistic inferences reveal a deep-seated devotion to Enlightenment categories and narrow unpoetic imaginations. Ideas have destinations, and one of the consequences of our trying to read the Scriptures without any poetry in our souls will be the eventual destruction of any possibility of ministering to souls. Just imagine the hymn writer trying to lift up the downcast: "I know not what the future holds, but I know Who also doesn't know much about it either."


Contributors to this collection of essays include John MacArthur, John Frame, Peter Leithart, Steve Schlissel, R.C. Sproul, Jr., and Douglas Wilson.

Comments: (7)
Uriel
This book is so effective at decimating the speculative,
conjectural,unbiblical Open Theory of Bible interpretation that it elicits responses and reviews like the 'consistent non-evangelical' who can't handle Biblical Truth.
The essays of this book examine Open Theory from many different
angles and find them all woefully deficient in properly
understanding the Bible. One only has to check out Open Theorist
Clark Pinnock's 'Most Moved Mover'(see separate review) and the
quasi-mormon view postulated to see where Open Theory logically
and 'consistently' leads.
As has been well said, what good is it to be sympathetic to a
belief system that may seem superficially more consistent and
so-called logical only to find it is abysmally erroneous as a
whole and unable to account for maximum Biblical texts in a fair and plenary way? Such is the fatal flaw with Open Theory which
this book does a great job in thoroughly, almost embarrassingly,
exposing.
Open Theory is a 'consistent' house of cards which collapses in
one breath of fresh air from correct biblical interpretation
and a bit of deeper thought applied to Who God is and What He can
know and When He can know it and how God's Unconditional
Sovereignty is compatible/complementary with mortal agency.
The reactions from liberal,uninformed,biblically deficient
critics who crave 'consistency' over correctness,cogency and
conformity to Scripture are in desperate need of reading
'Exegetical Fallacies' by D.A.Carson. In fact, Carson should come out with Volume II using Open Theory exclusively as how NOT to do Biblical Interpretation!
See Norm Geisler's 'Battle For God' and John Frame's 'No Other
God' for excellent elaboration of many points found in this book.
Bruce Ware's 'God's Lesser Glory' is also a powerful antidote
to the craving of 'new over true' of the Open Theory movement.
Goldcrusher
This 2001 collection contains twelve essays by authors such as R.C. Sproul, John M. Frame, John MacArthur, Peter Leithart, Steve Schissel, etc.

Editor Douglas Wilson suggests that some Open Theist statements about God "make one feel that our Open god is soon to appear as a guest on Oprah." (Pg. 24) MacArthur accuses Open Theists of creating "a quasi-divine being who has been divested of all the features of divine glory and majesty that might provoke any fear or dread in the creature. Instead, they have made Him into a kindly, nonthreatening heavenly valet." (Pg. 97) Another essayist suggests that they replace an "apathetic" God with one "who is merely pathetic." (Pg. 113)

Wilson observes that the debate over free will theism is not a debate between Calvinists and Arminians, since both of these groups maintain that "God knows the end from the beginning." (Pg. 146) He suggests that we must either recognize in the Bible an infinite God who occasionally condescends to appear "to finite men in a finite form," or else "we wind up with an Olympian Zeus---a god who sleeps, finds things out, gets hungry... as it pleases him." (Pg. 153)

An essayist suggests that the Open Theist view reduces God to a "cosmic gambler---and not a very successful one at that." (Pg. 177) Another essayist notes that foreknowledge of future events is a mark of deity, while the absence of that ability is "an attribute of vain idols." (Pg. 216)

This is not the most "in depth" critique of open theism available, but its breadth of different authors (frequently of the Presbyterian/Reformed perspective) makes it an interesting collection, and a valuable addition to the ongoing debate.
Dreladred
The fervor over Open Theism is akin to the pot calling the kettle black. Until those opposed to O.T can agree among themselves their attempted refutations will hold little punch.
It is laughable to see the likes of Erickson, Sproul, McArthur,and Norman Geisler all gang up on Open Theism when they cannot even agree among themselves.
This latest attack on O.T. shows just how much hypocrisy, politics and inconsistency exists among Evangelicals. Watch out Gregory Boyd the inquisitors are coming! Only this time they wear the banner of Evangelicalism.
The introduction to "Bound only Once" is filled with the sort of banter and silliness one finds among children arguing for attention.
It is indeed a sad day when Evangelicals have to resort to this sort of theological arrogance and anecdotal fanaticism in order to defend the theological status quo.
These evangelicals fail time and again to make logical sense of their adherence to the contradictory notions of free will and determinism.
I read Erickson's middle of the road position before. His "Christian Theology" is a good example of the confusion created when one picks and chooses among the petals of the TULIP. Once again we have rationalist apologist Norman Giesler wanting it both ways opting for the silly idea that we are "Chosen but free."
I could go on. Suffice to say that Wilson's book is another sad tribute to Evangelicalism's confused state of affairs. A state of affairs were myopic ego centered personalities battle for theological supremacy while claiming to hold forth THE Biblical view of a God they cannot even agree upon.
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