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eBook Worship in the Melting Pot epub

by Peter M Masters

eBook Worship in the Melting Pot epub
  • ISBN: 1870855337
  • Author: Peter M Masters
  • Genre: Religion
  • Subcategory: Worship & Devotion
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wakeman Trust (July 2, 2002)
  • Pages: 148 pages
  • ePUB size: 1377 kb
  • FB2 size 1192 kb
  • Formats rtf lit docx mobi


Worship is truly in the melting po. The best little book on worship I have ever read. My friend Dr Peter Masters assumed the pastorate of the famous Metropolitan Tabernacle (Spurgeon's church) in 1970 when attendance was 35 people.

Worship is truly in the melting pot. A new style of praise has swept into evangelical life, shaking to the foundations traditional concepts and attitudes. Two years earlier an auditor recommended closing the church because the weekly offerings did not cover the cost of heating the building on Sundays in the winter.

Start by marking Worship in the Melting Pot as Want to Read .

Start by marking Worship in the Melting Pot as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Is it all just a matter of generation and taste?

Peter Masters is new to me even though he has been pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London for 39. .From here Masters identified four major deviations from biblical standards in most modern worship. The first broken principle was that of aesthetic worship.

Peter Masters is new to me even though he has been pastor of the Metropolitan Tabernacle in London for 39 years. I am pleasantly surprised to see that he has his head screw on right and has a proper worldview. A friend in Germany sent me several CD's of his preaching and he is great. Worship that focused on the physical trappings of art, drama, music, and performances denied the fact that true worship was worship that emanated from the spirit of man apart from any external means.

The important point about this book is that it shows how the nature and content of worship are directed by the Lord God Himself

The important point about this book is that it shows how the nature and content of worship are directed by the Lord God Himself. They are therefore not to be controlled by circumstances of culture, taste or convenience, as is so often assumed today. Many have sought to throw old and new together into the "melting pot", thinking that in satisfying themselves and their congregations they will enrich their offering of praise.

This book presents four essential principles which Jesus Christ laid down for worship, and by.

This book presents four essential principles which Jesus Christ laid down for worship, and by which every new idea must be judged.

Contemporary worship is a form of Christian worship that emerged within Western evangelical Protestantism in the 20th century. Contemporary worship is generally characterised by the use of contemporary worship music in an informal setting.

They are muchretailed myths. Worship in the melting pot 4 The jibe is heard, for example, that Luther used tavern songs and dance tunes for his hymns. His music, it is said, was heavily influenced by the secular entertainment of the time, and newstyle worship is no worse. In his book, England Before and After Wesley, J. W. Bready tells us that in the Great Awakening of the eighteenth century - ‘The popular hymns and choruses contained no trace of ranting jingo or syncopated clamour: they bore no kinship to the uproar and fury of modern jazz, or to the insipidity of crooning.

The melting pot is a monocultural metaphor for a heterogeneous society becoming more homogeneous, the different elements "melting together" with a common culture, or vice versa, for a homogeneous society becoming more heterogeneous through.

The melting pot is a monocultural metaphor for a heterogeneous society becoming more homogeneous, the different elements "melting together" with a common culture, or vice versa, for a homogeneous society becoming more heterogeneous through the influx of foreign elements with different cultural backgrounds, possessing the potential to create disharmony within the previous culture. Historically, it is often used to describe the cultural integration of immigrants to the United States.

Founded in 1975, The Melting Pot has offered a unique fondue dining experience for 40 years. CommunitySee all. 432,188 people like this. 409,104 people follow this.

Publisher Marketing: New trends in worship have shaken traditional concepts and attitudes, giving rise to much heart-searching and a flurry of books. Is it all just a matter of generation and taste? Are the traditions of today only the innovations of yesterday? This lively and clearly reasoned book focuses on four crucial principles of worship laid down by Christ and strongly re-affirmed at the Reformation. These central pillars are rapidly passing out of sight today, yet it is surely by these that all new ideas should be assessed. Here also is a fascinating view of how they worshipped in Bible times, including the Old Testament rules for the use of instruments, and New Testament light on all the elements of worship normative for today. Worship in the Melting Pot has instantly become core reading among British evangelical pastors and lay people. Searching and challenging; dealing with principles not personalities
Comments: (7)
Renthadral
"Worship in the Melting Pot" was written by Dr. Peter Masters, the pastor of the world famous Metropolitan Tabernacle since 1970. The Metropolitan Tabernacle was the church which C. H. Spurgeon pastored in the 19th century. Metropolitan Tabernacle has continued in the Baptist tradition of simplicity and predictability in its worship, which is in stark contrast to the pre-Reformation aesthetic (visual and/or physical) worship of Roman Catholicism and the post-modern ecstatic (feeling oriented) and profane (worldly) worship of Charismaticism and Evangelicalism.

Dr. Masters set out to answer questions such as the following: "What's the matter with contemporary music groups? Isn't there every kind of instrument, including percussion, in the Psalms? Didn't they dance in worship in the Bible times?" (p. 9). He aimed to "focus on the four great pillars of worship--the principles which the Bible insists on" (p. 9).

Dr. Masters primary text for worship centered around Jesus' answer to the Samaritan woman at the well in John 4:23-24: "God is Spirit, and those who worship Him must worship in spirit and in truth." From here Masters identified four major deviations from biblical standards in most modern worship.

The first broken principle was that of aesthetic worship. Worship that focused on the physical trappings of art, drama, music, and performances denied the fact that true worship was worship that emanated from the spirit of man apart from any external means. Masters argued that today's contemporary worship with its bands, orchestras, lighting, and dance has become a throwback to the Roman Catholic emphasis on the physical to please the Lord. Great performances and production do not make, and in fact, may actually destroy, true worship.

The second broken principle was that of ecstatic worship. Worship that attempted to generate feelings at the expense of rationality denied the biblical principle of worshipping in truth. Modern worship tended to "dumb down" the songs, messages, and anything else that might cause a seriousness of thought on the part of the worshippers. Modern choruses were theologically shallow (if not down right wrong) and repetitive, and were used to generate an emotional state of satisfaction and happiness. Masters argued that emotions should be involved in worship, but only after the mind was engaged and made fully aware of the great truths found in Scripture.

The third broken principle was that of profane worship. Worship that adopted the styles and elements of the world that were directly associated with and used to promote anti-Christian themes and rebellion was worship that was worldly and profane. Worship has always maintained a separation from that which was evil; Christian worship was holy. Masters noted that the current trend arose out of two blending streams: [1] the Jesus People of California that refused to leave their "hippie mysticism" behind, and [2] worldly Christianity that wanted worship music to be like secular rock. These two were immediately adopted in Charismatic circles, which gave rise to almost all the new idioms of worship.

The fourth broken principle was that of reverence. Reverence and godliness ought to characterize Christian worship and Masters argued that when this was lost, everything else went. He showed how a reverence in worship affected not only the believer's demeanor at church, but also his dress, his behavior, his values, and even his personality.

Masters debunked the myths that the great hymn writers such as Martin Luther borrowed from profane secular music. He spent time showing what kind of instrumentation was used for Old Testament worship and why dance, lifting of hands, and unrestrained percussion were not to be used. He focused on several worship passages in Scripture which gave rise to the traditions used for generations in Protestant churches. He evaluated the Charismatic argument of spontaneous worship and showed that God's plan was that things were done decently and in order. He has some helpful charts that showed the similarity between the topics in traditional hymnals and the topics from the Psalms. He spent a great part of the book dealing with prayer in worship and gave a number of recommendations and biblical examples for public prayers.

The book was refreshing in that it completely avoided discussions of musical genres. Rock, pop, country, jazz, blues--who cared? The issue was one of biblical principles and the consequent rejection of all that failed to live up to the Bible standard. This book should be a serious read for all who are concerned about worship. Many fundamental churches fall far short of the ideals articulated during the Reformation and reaffirmed here by Masters, even if they have not fallen prey to the Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) movement.

While this reviewer did not necessarily agree with every specific conclusion put forth, Dr. Masters has presented a well articulated case against the modern worship trends. When one takes away the emotions involved in our worship and deals specifically with the biblical texts and arguments in this book, there will be little left to support the deviations Evangelicals--and Fundamentalists--have embraced over the last forty years.
Zulkigis
The best little book on worship I have ever read. My friend Dr Peter Masters assumed the pastorate of the famous Metropolitan Tabernacle (Spurgeon's church) in 1970 when attendance was 35 people. Two years earlier an auditor recommended closing the church because the weekly offerings did not cover the cost of heating the building on Sundays in the winter. However, through the faithful perseverance of those thirty-five people and the commitment of the pastor and his faithful wife to serving God and remaining true to Biblical guidelines for worship, the church now must use every corner of their facility on Sundays to seat worshipers. Throughout the 43 year ministry of Peter Masters at Metropolitan Tabernacle he has led the congregation to employ God's revealed principles for worshiping Him while most other ministries have desperately resorted to entertainment and the use of Hollywood techniques to hold or build attendance. Such carnal means are not necessary and are an impediment to meaningful worship. Read the book!
Reddefender
This is a good book. I guess I would disagree with some of what is said but he none the less does get his point across. And for the most part it is on the money. I would definitely recommend the book as an insightful read. Bob Jones
Owomed
Excellent material from a clear thinking, sober minded and scriptural pastor. I would highly recommend this book on a Very important subject.
POFOD
This isn't a book to be read casually. It is a book upon which one must meditate carefully. I began my read on this book as a follow up on a magazine article that quoted from this book. I found as I read that the author was quite detailed and academic in the material covered. It was obvious from the outset that his path was one to negate modern approaches to something that is timeless-worship. Many would question his belief that worship for the most part has gone awry. He supports his statements with voluminous quotes from the scriptures. One may disagree with his approach to the subject but his scriptural support is inescapable. I consider it a must for anyone who seeks to learn the path of true worship. I recommend it highly.
Jeyn
This is one of the most relevant Christian books available. Pastor Peter Masters brilliantly describes what is not in accordance to the biblical worship in many Christian services nowadays. Even if you disagree with some of his positions this is a must read to enlighten us about the topic that is not at all considered as important for many as it should be. It is a short book that can be read in an afternoon and it is difficult to put aside because Pastor Peter Masters writes in a very direct and captivating way. We need to rethink what is being done in our churches. Another book that treats the theme in a broader way is John Macarthur's "Worship: The Ultimate Priority". We have to fight the "invasion" of the world in the church. Although it is not a new problem (as seen in the Down-Grade Controversy in the 19th Century) we cannot fold for this and should focus on Jesus, Who is our Lord. Great book to motivate you to further research.
Foiuost
Was a good eye opening experience to read. I would recommend any one serious about there worship. In their church should read this book.
Masters addresses the popular movement called the contemporary Christian movement, covering the biblical use of music. He makes a strong case for reverence in the worship of God. This book is highly recommended by
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