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eBook Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn; Rebecca; Frenchman's Creek; My Cousin Rachel epub

by Daphne Du Maurier

eBook Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn; Rebecca; Frenchman's Creek; My Cousin Rachel epub
  • ISBN: 0575025093
  • Author: Daphne Du Maurier
  • Genre: Romance
  • Subcategory: Historical
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Victor Gollancz (1978)
  • ePUB size: 1643 kb
  • FB2 size 1968 kb
  • Formats txt doc docx lrf


Rebecca/Jamaica Inn/Frenchman's Creek/My Cousin Rachel. I've saved this book on my to-read list for so long

Rebecca/Jamaica Inn/Frenchman's Creek/My Cousin Rachel. Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier (2002-07-30). I've saved this book on my to-read list for so long. It's one of the "secret treat" books I've stocked up like emergency supplies for desperate moments, when I need something new to me but 100% guaranteed lovely. After a lot of recent travel, stress, and child minding, I finally found a few hours of respite in a warm lamplit room, deliciously alone.

Four Great Cornish Novels book. Daphne du Maurier's novels set in Cornwall have always been her most popular, perhaps because she herself has made her home in and around Fowey and seems to have absorbed so much of the atmosphere of that land of mystery and dark deeds.

My father and mother died before I was two years old. I cannot remember them. My cousin Rachel is a very intelligent woman, Ambrose wrote. But, thank God, she doesn't talk too much. Her gardens are beautiful. The weather is getting warmer and 1 am spending a lot of time in them. My cousin Rachel is pleased to have an English friend and I am giving her advice about business matters. She has very little money. Because I have helped her, my cousin Rachel has helped me find many beautiful plants.

Daphne du Maurier (1907 - 89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du. .Rebecca is my all-time favourite novel. It doesn't get any better than this gothic tale, famously set at Manderley. The suspense du Maurier builds is incredible.

Daphne du Maurier (1907 - 89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of George du Maurier, the author and artist. She began writing short stories and articles in 1928 and in 1931 her first novel, THE LOVING SPIRIT, was published. It was the novel REBECCA that launched her into the literary stratosphere and made her one of the most popular authors of all time.

Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn . by Daphne du Maurier. Select Format: Hardcover. Four Du Maurier novels in one book. It doesn't get any better than this.

Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn, Rebecca, Frenchman's Creek, My Cousin Rachel.

Several of Du Maurier's other novels have also been adapted for the screen, including Jamaica Inn, Frenchman's Creek, Hungry Hill, and My Cousin Rachel

DBE. The young Daphne du Maurier (about 1930). 1907-05-13)13 May 1907 London, England. Several of Du Maurier's other novels have also been adapted for the screen, including Jamaica Inn, Frenchman's Creek, Hungry Hill, and My Cousin Rachel. The Hitchcock film The Birds (1963) is based on a treatment of one of her short stories, as is the film Don't Look Now (1973). Of the films, du Maurier often complained that the only ones she liked were Hitchcock's Rebecca and Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now.

The Jamaica Early Childhood Curriculum Guide . Telugu novels online free pdf Yandamuri verendranatha novel abhilasha. Three Mistakes of My Life by Chetan Bhagat.

The Jamaica Early Childhood Curriculum Guide: Birth to Three is Key of the existing curriculum The J.Dangerous Attraction Romantic Suspense Boxed Set (9 Novels from Bestselling Authors, plus Bonus. 1001 Ways to Be Romantic. 73 MB·8,202 Downloads. 72 MB·173,606 Downloads. There are advantages in having a wife smarter than you.

My Cousin Rachel is the second work of Daphne du Maurier (1907 to.

My Cousin Rachel is the second work of Daphne du Maurier (1907 to 1981-UK) that I have read. My first of her works was Rebecca, her consensus best work. Like Rebecca, My Cousin Rachel centers on a sinister seeming woman who uses her wiles to deceive a wealthy but naive man into endowing her with wealth. Both of the women have nefarious men in their pasts who intrude into the future. I loved the way du Maurier created the almost misogynistic atmosphere in the opening chapters of the book. Much of the book is beautifully written and there are some simply stunning sentences and turns of phrases.

Daphne Du Maurier Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn; Rebecca; Frenchman's Creek; My Cousin Rachel. ISBN 13: 9780575025097. Four Great Cornish Novels: Jamaica Inn; Rebecca; Frenchman's Creek; My Cousin Rachel.

Y'all, I'm dazzled by du Maurier's talent here

You can read book My Cousin Rachel by Daphne Du Maurier in our library for absolutely free. This novel could be its own master class in how to use an unreliable narrator to guide your readers through a mystery so ambiguous and suspenseful they can find themselves entertaining at least three. plausible solutions until the very last sentence. Y'all, I'm dazzled by du Maurier's talent here.

Comments: (7)
Washington
This is an edited watered down version of the book. It poses as the real thing but please don't waste your money. I bought this as an ebook companion to my hard copy and I regret the decision completely. If you want Rebecca buy the publishers version.
Not only is the book edited but there are so many typos and errors.

This is terrible, do not buy.
LONUDOG
This is a great book - if you get the full book. This Kindle edition doesn't start at the beginning. Rebecca has one literature's most famous first lines: "
Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again". This version skips the first chapter entirely and starts around chapter 3. It is an insult to a wonderful book. Don't make a mistake and get it. You will miss the real depth of the book.
Dusho
DO NOT BUY. This should not have Daphne du Maurier's name on it as this is a hatchet job of her wonderful book. I had to return the digital copy and decided to buy the more expensive one. I originally went with this cause I didn't need the included audiobook in the more expensive one but this is only 1/4 the length of the actual book and is riddled with spelling and punctuation errors. This is not the version of the classic that you are looking for. DO NOT BUY.
Questanthr
The formatting and typos in this book make it almost unreadable. It is truly awful. Spend the extra six bucks and get a decent version.

Edit: after buying the $9.99 version of Rebecca, I now know this version is barely similar to the 'real' story. The famous opening line 'I dreamt again of Manderley.....’ doesn't even appear and the book seems to be a very poorly condensed edit or...something....?? I'm asking for a refund. The publisher should be ashamed!
Cyregaehus
I've always been an admirer of the first person narrative. When handled deftly, it magnifies the complex variables that comprise us all. Rebecca is a psychological treatise with a confessional tone spawned from the narrator's perception, and this is the story. That the narrator is young, inexperienced, and overwhelmed to the point of skittishness sets the dark tone of every paragraph in this cleverly paced mystery. Her vantage point is solidly built on assumption, suspicion and crippling self doubt. The plot is a simple one: the young narrator begins as a paid, personal companion to a domineering wealthy woman, who is on holiday in Monte Carlo, when fate places her in the dining room of a luxuriant hotel next to the table of the troubled widower, Max de Winter, who hails from the Cornish Coast. An awkward and unlikely alliance develops between the narrator and the worldly Max de Winter, which leads to a hasty marriage, in which the reader learns along with the narrator of de Winters' disturbing past. Set in the house and rambling coastal grounds of de Winters' stately Manderley, the narrator enters a dynamic firmly in play, whose tone was cast and exists still from the hand of Rebecca: the first Mrs. de Winter. Rebecca's shadow looms imperiously, and brings to the fore the narrator's insecurities. Having no background story on her predecessor, the inchoate narrator is tossed by the winds of assumption, half-truths and incomplete perceptions made all the more dark by the presence of Rebecca's loyal personal maid, Mrs. Danvers, whose presence lends a disquieting air, due to her supercilious knack for comparison. Rebecca is an off-kilter mystery that unfolds along the road of the search for truth regarding what, exactly, happened to Rebecca. That the narrator stays in suspense until the sinister end lures the reader through a story elegantly told in language so poetic, it is its own experience.
Cktiell
I've saved this book on my to-read list for so long. It's one of the "secret treat" books I've stocked up like emergency supplies for desperate moments, when I need something new to me but 100% guaranteed lovely. After a lot of recent travel, stress, and child minding, I finally found a few hours of respite in a warm lamplit room, deliciously alone. Rebecca was indeed exactly what I needed.

All this aside, the book isn't for everyone. If you're not already a fan, this checklist may help you decide whether or not to add Rebecca to your own secret treat shelf:

1. Do you like gothic fiction?

Although it was first published in 1938, Rebecca ages exquisitely and i's not hard for a modern reader to fall deeply in love with it. The style and turns of phrase are no barrier--it's the genre itself that will either draw you in or leave you cold. I loved Jane Eyre as a child, and this love abetted my love of Rebecca, which is famously derivative of Jane Eyre's general plot: woman falls in love with a man haunted in mysterious ways by his former wife. If the idea of women wandering windswept grounds of great houses, plagued by mysterious barriers to love, sometimes in the form of the ghost (literal or figurative) of another woman sounds cozy to you, if you loved Catherine and Heathcliff or Darcy and Elizabeth, and you fancy dark psychological acrobatics, give Rebecca a shot.

2. Does a warm bath, a hot drink, and a new sweater sound good to you right now?

Rebecca is a fall read, hands down. It's rainy, it's morose, it's the dominating presence of a grand old mansion in a remote location.

3. Have you seen the movie Rebecca (1940), did you like it, do you like old movies at all?

The movie does not follow the plot exactly, but having loved the movie for a long time and now having read the book, the tone of the movie feels authentic and true to the novel. Once every few years, I go on an autumn binge and watch The Uninvited (1944), Vertigo (1958), Rebecca, and to end on a lighter note, The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947).

4. Are you a feminist?

Old fashioned gender roles in Rebecca's setting will definitely irk some readers. As a feminist, I was less annoyed than interested. The mirroring of the protagonist (shy, inexperienced, subservient) and the dead Rebecca (domineering, brave, selfish, accomplished) added a great sociological layer to the experience of reading. Sally Beauman's excellent Afterword offers a wonderful explanation of the gendered forces at work in Rebecca, and also addresses several misinterpretations of the novel at the time of its publication.

If you've answered yes to any of the questions above, I absolutely recommend that you read the first 30 pages at least. Get past the description of Manderly in the dream, and begin to read about when the protagonist first meets widower Maxim de Winter, and if you're liking it by then, you'll love the rest.
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