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eBook Lunatic Fringe (Tales of the Pack, Book 1) epub

by Allison Moon

eBook Lunatic Fringe (Tales of the Pack, Book 1) epub
  • ISBN: 0983830916
  • Author: Allison Moon
  • Genre: Romance
  • Subcategory: Paranormal
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Lunatic Ink; First Paperback Edition edition (September 14, 2011)
  • Pages: 300 pages
  • ePUB size: 1810 kb
  • FB2 size 1469 kb
  • Formats azw doc lit rtf


I tend to Allison Moon's Lunatic Fringe is a truly wonderful read, the kind of story that manages to simultaneously by clever, sexy, frightening, and engaging.

I tend to Allison Moon's Lunatic Fringe is a truly wonderful read, the kind of story that manages to simultaneously by clever, sexy, frightening, and engaging. It's one of those books where you're never quite sure what to expect, but are never disappointed by the surprises on the next page. The story takes quite a while to really settle into the core storyline, but Allison establishes the world so carefully, and builds up the characters so beautifully, you don't begrudge the long introduction.

Similar books to Lunatic Fringe (Tales of the Pack Book 1. Lunatic Fringe is a pretty foxy romance and an excellent exploration of groups and identity, both of which make it a strong debut from Ms. Moon.

Similar books to Lunatic Fringe (Tales of the Pack Book 1). Try Kindle Countdown Deals Explore limited-time discounted eBooks. Allison Moon has written a novel that reflects women today with an engaging story filled with folklore, romance & sex. She could very well be the writer to give feminism a good name again. Jon Imparato, Artistic Director of the Lily Tomlin/Jane Wagner Cultural Arts Center.

Hungry Ghost (Book 2) picks up where Lunatic Fringe left off, as Lexie becomes part of the Pack and takes . The book is set to release in April of 2013, so all this will take time and focus.

Hungry Ghost (Book 2) picks up where Lunatic Fringe left off, as Lexie becomes part of the Pack and takes on her role as a werewolf hunter. She makes new friends, discovers new powers, and has to defend her family and her town against a new Big Bad. The series explores feminism, queer identity, gender politics, and community, all within the werewolf world. After the book is printed and done, I'll need to get the marketing machine in motion, visiting bookstores, getting press, and all the other aspects of being a modern working writer.

Lunatic Fringe is a coming-of-age, lesbian paranormal romance. Allison Moon is a writer. Allison Moon is a writer based in Northern California. She has been published in Not For Tourists, Nerve. com, scientific journals and elsewhere

Lunatic Fringe is a coming-of-age, lesbian paranormal romance. com, scientific journals and elsewhere. She has been profiled in Frontiers Magazine and her photography and design have appeared in the LA Times, LA Weekly, Velvetpark, & Blade.

The girls gathered in the backyard, circled around a small fire burning in the pit. Fog accumulated beneath the young trees at the edge of the property and beaded every surface with wetness. Fog accumulated beneath the young trees at the edge of the property and beaded every surface with wetness re black and carried a length of rope around her shoulder. Renee, too, looked like a cat-burglar as she lubricated the spring mechanism on a crossbow. Jenna adjusted her gloves, a bowie knife strapped to her belt.

Tales of the Pack is a book series written by Allison Moon featuring a pack of lesbian werewolves. Lunatic Fringe, the first book of the series, introduces the series protagonist Lexie Clarion as she enrolls in Milton College. She befriends a group of radical lesbian werewolf-hunters, and soon after, she falls for a mysterious woman who may be among the hunted. Not to be confused with a certain WWE Superstar named Dean Ambrose who goes by the nickname of The Lunatic Fringe. The second book, Hungry Ghost, was published in April 2013.

Lunatic Fringe is the first book in the Tales of the Pack series. I’m reading book now, progress 10% of story; I’m not certain how book will be. Protagonist Lex didn’t aware about her identity before she went collage. She suddenly met The Pack feminist group in collage, started know about her identity and new life. I like this early part. It reminds my past to me because I didn’t know my identity just one and little more months before.

Keeping Kylen: Book 11 of the Moon Pack series. The Accidental Highwayman: Being the Tale of Kit Bristol, His Horse Midnight, a Mysterious Princess, and Sundry Magical Persons Besides by Ben Tripp. What others are saying. Eighteenth-century England: Mistaken for his master, a notorious highwayman, Kit is drawn into a fantastic adventure involving a fairy princess, gobling attacks, and a magical map.

Lunatic Fringe indulges the feminine wild by giving the classic werewolf myth a lesbian twist. Lexie Clarion's first night at college, she falls in with a pack of radical feminist werewolf hunters. The next morning, she falls for a mysterious woman who may be among the hunted. As Lexie's new lover and the Pack battle for Lexie's allegiance, the waxing moon illuminates old hatreds, new enemies, and a secret from Lexie's childhood that will change her life forever.Lunatic Fringe is the first book in the Tales of the Pack series.
Comments: (7)
Vushura
There was a good, solid, nugget of a story here. But I almost put it down and quit reading because the feminist diatribe was so overwhelming. And that's saying a lot, because I tend to agree with all that feminist diatribe. I just don't need to be lectured about it. The lectures were so annoying, that for a hot second I imagined myself voting Republican just to be oppositional.

But I was forewarned by other reviewers, so I skimmed the lectures and powered through to the dark and stormy night when the plot actually takes off. Now, the real action starts at a stereotypical hippy-dippy drum-circle party. And that was annoying too. But a few pages further and the author quit "telling" and started "showing" and the story revealed itself incrementally.

And then it was good. The werewolves begged some questions (like, why can't they smell other werewolves?), but it's fine with me that I didn't get all the answers I wanted. The story was alright, and the plot was pretty solid. I was as invested in Lexie's angst over her missing mother as I was in the romantic plot.

I would have liked more nuance in the moral value system. I really don't care that they kill rapists. But I wondered why killing a rapist is murder, but killing a werewolf isn't? If a werewolf attacks a woman, then the werewolf is hunted down and killed. But if a human male attacks a woman... killing him is murder? What's the difference? I wanted to examine the shades of morality a little closer, instead of treating it as so black and white.

I also wanted more details on werewolf hunting. Perhaps if the lectures were shorter and I had more pages of them actually doing stuff (the whole "show" don't "tell" thing again).

Anyway, when all is said and done, I don't regret buying this book. It holds up favorably against other lesbian werewolf novels. I guess the true test is whether I would read the sequel. And...

I would read it. I just wouldn't buy it... Not new, anyway. If I can read it for free, or for cheap, I'll check out the sequel. But the author has got to stop it with the heavy-handed lectures if she wants me to pay full price for her books.
Manemanu
Lunatic Fringe is a werewolf story that almost gets lost in a long discussion of feminist politics and too many typographical mistakes.

The basic story in this book is good, although a little confusing. The characters draw a difference between Weres and Werewolves, but they seem to turn out to be the same people. Once the story gets going however, things make more sense and the details are easier to follow. It makes it clear that the line between the "good guys" and the "bad guys" can be very thin. Lexie is a perplexing character, but that reflects the situation she finds herself in as she tries to determine exactly what her future is going to be. Some of the characters are well developed, but there are a number of holes that needed filling with details. The book has an open ended conclusion because it's meant to be a series, but that isn't very satisfying for a reader, especially one who decides not to read any further books.

The book has two big drawbacks. There are too many mistakes. Words are missing, some are used incorrectly and others use archaic definitions that don't really fit current usage. More than once a paragraph had to be reread to try and figure out exactly what was being said. This happens enough that it detracts from the reading and gives the book an unfinished feeling.

An good editor also would have cut out a lot of material. When the Pack first appears, a long diatribe begins about how women have been oppressed and men are the sole source of their problems. The book gets bogged down in long political discussions that obscure the plot. Although some of the ideas eventually become important to the characters, they go on for so long that some readers may be inclined to stop reading. If you have to tell the reader something six times, then you aren't being very clear. It doesn't help much when the Pack turns out to be composed of some of the most hypocritical characters in the book and, apparently, is only interested in killing male werewolves. The idea that men are the source of all problems wears thin, especially in light of the behavior of the Pack. There are holes in the story that a decent editor would have eliminated or made sure were filled in.

Allison Moon needs to make a decision. Either write a political book to discuss her type of feminism or write fiction with just enough polemic to shade her characters, but not interfere with the story. If she can find an editor to help with her weaknesses, Lunatic Fringe might turn out to be a mediocre start to a promising series.
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