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eBook The Catalogue of the Universe epub

by Margaret Mahy

eBook The Catalogue of the Universe epub
  • ISBN: 0749708565
  • Author: Margaret Mahy
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Astronomy & Space Science
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mammoth; New Ed edition (February 21, 1991)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1538 kb
  • FB2 size 1777 kb
  • Formats azw mobi lit lrf


Margaret Mahy of New Zealand wrote more than 100 picture books, 40 novels and 20 short story collections, among other works. Variant titles are given in parentheses, prefaced by ".

Margaret Mahy of New Zealand wrote more than 100 picture books, 40 novels and 20 short story collections, among other works. Margaret Mahy bibliography at the University of Auckland Library's New Zealand Literature File.

In short, Margaret Mahy may well be having a good laugh at my ineptitude. I mean, the title of the book is "The Catalogue of the Universe" for pete's sake

In short, Margaret Mahy may well be having a good laugh at my ineptitude. Having known her to be considered perhaps the greatest young adult fantasy writer in the known world, I picked up "The Catalogue of the Universe" with my typical snotty snobby snitty opinions of what the story would entail. Actually, since I like to read books without knowing ANYTHING about the plot ahead of time, my opinions of this book totaled one in number. I was convinced that this was a fantasy book. I mean, the title of the book is "The Catalogue of the Universe" for pete's sake.

Catalogue of the Universe is not a fantasy or science fiction tale

Catalogue of the Universe is not a fantasy or science fiction tale. It does have a great deal to do with science, however (nerds rejoice! I know I did). Instead, they're just people being people, and the people are really dimensional and interesting: Angela, the beautiful girl who wants to find her father; Tycho, the short astronomer who loves Angela; their families and houses - and that's about it.

Books by New Zealand author Margaret Mahy. Pages in category "Books by Margaret Mahy". The Catalogue of the Universe. The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more). H. The Haunting (Mahy novel). L. A Lion in the Meadow. php?title Category:Books by Margaret Mahy&oldid 913269988".

An exciting adventure from Margaret Mahy – blended with her . All three parties immediately organise trips to the Antarctic – all with the same goal in mind (solving the mystery of the Riddle) but each with very different intentions. Aliens In The Family.

An exciting adventure from Margaret Mahy – blended with her trademark surreal humour and writing that makes you want to read it. Sophie Sapwood, daughter of the famous explorer, Bonniface Sapwood, discovers a whalebone pendant hidden at the back of her chest of drawers. At the same time, deep in the frozen wastes of the Antarctic, the ghost of Captain Cathcardo awakens from an ancient sleep, trapped in the Antarctic on his ship, The Riddle.

Author: Margaret Mahy. Genre: Contemporary, Young Adult. I am glad I did give her books another chance because I fell hard for The Catalogue of the Universe and have ALL THE FEELS about it. Any Mahy fans in the house?

Author: Margaret Mahy. Angela and Tycho seem an unlikely pair - she is beautiful and confident, he is awkward and quietly intellectual. Any Mahy fans in the house? What should I read next? Notable Quotes/ Parts: A favourite moment below (quite spoilery BUT OH SO GOOD).

A moving and lyrical story that explores the truth of adolescence from Carnegie Medal-winning author, Margaret Mahy.

Remove from Wishlist. A moving and lyrical story that explores the truth of adolescence from Carnegie Medal-winning author, Margaret Mahy.

The Catalogue of the Universe. by Margaret Mahy · Darren Hopes. On the fifth anniversary of his sister's death, nineteen-year-old Jonny Dart is still troubled by guilt and an imperfect memory of the accident that took her life

The Catalogue of the Universe. Like the great philosophers they study, to. The Haunting. On the fifth anniversary of his sister's death, nineteen-year-old Jonny Dart is still troubled by guilt and an imperfect memory of the accident that took her life. The Great White Man-Eating Shark: A Cautionary Tale.

Immediately download the The Catalogue of the Universe summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays . New Zealand author Margaret Mahy has made a career of tickling funny bones, teasing the imagination, and sending shivers up spines of young readers

Immediately download the The Catalogue of the Universe summary, chapter-by-chapter analysis, book notes, essays, quotes, character descriptions, lesson plans, and more - everything you need for studying or teaching The Catalogue of the Universe.

Comments: (6)
Blackredeemer
This book was very odd. It's intelligent and well written, which is unusual in itself. It illuminates a love story between a beautiful girl and a "loser" guy. But there's nothing explicit, and it is discreet with pulling the curtain across. The characters are all a little strange, which is always good. Recommended.
Lilegha
My friends, I have been tricked. Throughly fooled. Utterly led astray. In short, Margaret Mahy may well be having a good laugh at my ineptitude. Having known her to be considered perhaps the greatest young adult fantasy writer in the known world, I picked up "The Catalogue of the Universe" with my typical snotty snobby snitty opinions of what the story would entail. Actually, since I like to read books without knowing ANYTHING about the plot ahead of time, my opinions of this book totaled one in number. I was convinced that this was a fantasy book. I mean, the title of the book is "The Catalogue of the Universe" for pete's sake. The cover shows planets and young swimmy faces. And it's written by the woman who wrote the illustrious "The Changeover". So I picked up, read it through, and kept stopping at the end of each and every chapter to wonder where the magic was. Let this be a lesson to all, you foolish reviewers like myself who prefer to infer storylines rather than, oh say, read the summaries on the backs of the books. If you leap to conclusions, you're liable to make a fool of yourself. And I adore telling the world when I've been silly, so it worked out perfectly for me. In short (har har), "The Catalogue of the Universe" is a romantic, emotional, humorous, philosophical tale of two teens and the different ways in which they try to sort out the mysteries of the cosmos/their lives.

Angela is beautiful and she knows it. She's the kind of girl who attracts men with relative ease and lives life exactly as she would like to. Of course she has a crazy single mom and she lives in a house with an honest-to-goodness outhouse, but that's fine with her. It's the fact that she's never met her biological father that stings. All at once charming and impulsive, Angela decides to enmesh her best friend Tycho in her plans to meet her pop for the very first time. Tycho has his own set of problems, however. As a particularly romantic and philosophical young man (in no little part due to his name), Tycho's in love with Angela. They both know this and they both know it's a hopeless situation. Plus he has a crazy family to deal with and some serious self-esteem issues. Still, in a series of wild confrontations, escapes, and rescues the two friends begin to learn a little more about themselves and their relationship with the Catalogue of the Universe.

Mahy places herself at a disadvantage right from the start. She's placed her book squarely in the palms of a beautiful female protagonist. Many otherwise well-written books have faltered with this kind of character (most notably the oft banned, "Blood and Chocolate"). When a teen girl is beautiful and knows it, it's incredibly difficult not to make her a conceited little cur. Mahy tries her best to keep Angela under control, but the character is a little too headstrong and wild. She's likable once in a while but thoroughly detestable others. You begin to wonder why it is that fabulous Tycho (who I am personally nominating for the Best Datable Young Adult Novel Character Award of 1985) even hangs around her. Sure she's pretty. But she's also high-strung and insensitive to others. In the hands of a lesser writer this would be a distinct problem. Fortunately, Mahy's clever enough to split Angela's story with Tycho's. You get an even look at the goings on in both their families. It was with great relief that the reader leaves Angela's nutty adventures in the wings while Tycho takes the center stage.

It's funny, but I haven't even mentioned the scientific, sociological, anthropological, and philosophical discussions that pepper this book. This is the perfect young adult novel for that kid who thinks about the big questions constantly. The ideal reader of this book is a teen who understands why Tycho sticks sentences he likes over his bed so that he'll see them first thing in the morning. Honestly, sometimes the discussions of the universe between Tycho and Angela went a little over my head. I liked that. It's a rare feeling to pick up a YA novel and feel left behind. It makes you want to read the book over and over again. It makes you want to (gasp, shudder) BUY the book. This is a feeling I rarely have. I have it now.

Just in case my mention of philosophy scared you off, I'm going to reel you into the I Love The Catalogue of the Universe Club by mentioning its humor. This book is hee-larious. Witty banter galore. If you're a fan of fast-paced conversations containing biting wit, this book is also for you. Tycho's discussions with his brother, if read aloud, would probably baffle some. In a conversation with their mother about their older (and over adored) sister Africa, Tycho and his brother Richard discuss their parents' preference:

"Of course I'm jealous," Richard said, "and so is Tycho, aren't you, Tyke? You often wondered why he was so short. Well, I'll tell you now: it's jealousy that's stunted him".

"I tried to grow," Tycho said, responding immediately. "I did my best, but I was weighted down hour after hour by..."

That's a common conversation. Fast dialogue and smart characters. So smart, in fact, that you'll wish you were in the kitchen with them enjoying the full extent of their humor.

So the book has it all. Mind-blowing theorems, romance, likable characters (on the whole), and funny passages. In short, it's frighteningly well-written. There aren't enough books in the world to compare to this brilliant little number. If you know of any teen that wants a book that doesn't talk down to them or patronize them in the least, "The Catalogue of the Universe" is ideal. It isn't a fantasy (as I discovered). It's better. It's reality in its finest light.
Sharpbinder
Ever since he first saw her, in kindergarten, Tycho has been madly in love with Angela. However, he was always small and funny-looking and at first she didn't notice him at all. Later, when she did notice him, she made him into a best friend instead of a boyfriend as he would have liked. She reserved that position for better looking and more confident guys in their class.

As her best friend, though, Tycho does hold a special position in Angela's life. He knows things about her she doesn't share with her boyfriends, and he is the one she often turns to when she has a serious problem. Now that she is a senior in high school, treading water until the end of the year, there is something bothering her.

Angela has never known her father. Her mother is her best friend and greatest protector and over the years has told her stories about the wonderful man who was her father, but Angela has never met him. Now she has managed to track him down, and she wants to meet him and talk to him, to hear what he has to say about her. She wants a relationship with him, but she suspects her mother won't approve and somehow her boyfriend Robin isn't the right one to help her.

So Angela turns to Tycho to be her partner in meeting her father. But when things go all wrong and Angela's world seems to crash around her, will Tycho be strong enough to help her get back on her feet?

I loved Tycho's personality and his family's dynamics. I also liked the history between Tycho and Angela, and I liked his big blowup and his confession after she met her father. He was a fantastic character. The book threw me off a bit, though, starting off seeming mysterious but then ending up staying strictly in the real world. Because I liked Tycho so much, I didn't like the way Angela kept stringing him along.
Freighton
I originally saw this book and though it might be a good one to add to my classroom collection (as a middle school science teacher). So I put it on my wishlist. It was given to me as a gift a few weeks ago and with time on my hands I decided to read it. This book was more of a romance than I expected and less of a science book. While it had some good science material in it about the stars, I do not believe it would be good for kids at age 12. Two teens become friends after viewing a lunar eclipse, though they have known each other since they were 5. He has been in love with her since they met, and she has been in love with romance. It seems a typical one-sided relationship for him until she realizes that romantic ideas have a place, but do not rule all we do. She finally sees him for the wonderful person he has always been and falls in love with him. Though I do not usually read romance-type stories, it is a nice story and I am glad that I read it.
Eta
At the age of 20 I sometimes still feel young enough to read this kind of books. I have heard many people praise ms Mahy's talent, but this was my first touch with her - I must say I wasn't disappointed. This book contains some clever dialogue, it has a great attitude and it is well-written too. Of course, the story is quite escapistic, but I don't personally mind reading about beautiful girls falling in love with desperate losers. According to my own experience, such things don't happen very often in the real world, but as light entertainment this book functions very well. And if we keep in mind that it's meant for people aged about 14-16, I think I'll let the author get a bit educational. After all, this is an intelligent book. It speaks of human relationships with good taste and doesn't stay too middle-of-the road. The characters are all a little strange, which makes it all more interesting. I recommend.
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