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eBook North American Tree Squirrels epub

by STEELE MICHAEL A

eBook North American Tree Squirrels epub
  • ISBN: 1560989866
  • Author: STEELE MICHAEL A
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Biological Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Smithsonian; 1 edition (September 17, 2001)
  • Pages: 201 pages
  • ePUB size: 1616 kb
  • FB2 size 1573 kb
  • Formats lit txt txt rtf


Michael A. Steele is associate professor of biology at Wilkes University in Pennsylvania.

Michael A. John L. Koprowski is associate professor of wildlife and fisheries science at the University of Arizona.

North American Tree Squirrels book.

North American Tree Squirrels. Book · January 2001 with 178 Reads. How we measure 'reads'. Tree canopies provide sheltering, nesting sites and feeding opportunities ( Munyenyembe et a. 1989;Steele and Koprowski, 2001). Specially, birds use dense tree canopies, tree trunk with holes and branches that produce fruits or seeds.

The American red squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) is a tree squirrel found in areas with coniferous trees. Their main diet consists of conifer cone seeds. However, the squirrel’s population is under threat of decline in Arizona. A fox squirrel climbing a tree.

By Michael A. Steele and John L. Koprowski. Written with clarity and wit by two top scientists, North American Tree Squirrels illuminates the everyday lives of gray and fox squirrels, the two most dominant types of tree squirrels of the eastern United States.

Written with clarity and wit by two top scientists, North American Tree Squirrels illuminates the everyday lives .

Written with clarity and wit by two top scientists, North American Tree Squirrels illuminates the everyday lives of gray and fox squirrels, the two most dominant types of tree squirrels of the eastern United States. Book Format: Paperback. The authors compare and contrast tree squirrels with other members of their family, including ground squirrels, chipmunks, marmots, and prairie dogs. The ecology of the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) in North Carolina: implications for survival in the Southeast. PD Weigl, MA Steele, LJ Sherman, JC Ha, TL Sharpe. MA Steele, JL Koprowski. Smithsonian Institution Press, 2001. Tamiasciurus hudsonicus. Mammalian species, 1-9, 1998. Squirrels of the world. Climate change induced hybridization in flying squirrels. CJ Garroway, J Bowman, TJ Cascaden, GL Holloway, CG Mahan,. Global Change Biology 16 (1), 113-121, 2010.

Written by two top scientists, "North American Tree Squirrels" illuminates the . The book concludes with descriptions of the biology of North America's.

Written by two top scientists, "North American Tree Squirrels" illuminates the everyday lives of gray and fox squirrels, the two most dominant types of tree squirrels of the eastern United States. The book concludes with descriptions of the biology of North America's other tree squirrels.

Tree squirrels are the members of the squirrel family (Sciuridae) commonly just referred to as "squirrels". They include over a hundred arboreal species native to all continents except Antarctica and Oceania. They do not form a single natural, or monophyletic group; they are related to others in the squirrel family, including ground squirrels, flying squirrels, marmots, and chipmunks.

Written with clarity and wit by two top scientists, North American Tree Squirrels illuminates the everyday lives of gray and fox squirrels, the two most dominant types of tree squirrels of the eastern United States. Drawing on more than twenty years of research, Michael A. Steele and John L. Koprowski detail the behavior, reproduction, diet, physiology, and habitat use of these engaging rodents, as well as their complex interdependent relationships with seed-producing trees.
Comments: (2)
Utchanat
What a great read! It makes me look at our neighborhood squirrels -- the ones we feed by hand -- in a new, more admiring way.
Faegal
NORTH AMERICAN TREE SQUIRRELS by M.A. Steele and J.L. Koprowski is a 201-page book, printed on off-white paper. The book contains just over a dozen black and white photographs, as well as a few tables and pen-and-ink drawings. The photos are of medium quality. The front and back covers have three color photos of squirresl, one of which is a tassel-eared squirrel. The exact, same photo of Mister Tassel-Ear also appears on page 6, as a black and white photo.

REASONS TO BUY THIS BOOK. This book will make an ideal gift to folks interested in the out-of-doors, including hikers, bird-watchers, photographers, and campers. Also, this book could be an inspiration to any middle-school student contemplating a science fair project. I have served as a science fair judge at Randall Museum in San Francisco and at annual STEM fair in San Francisco, and for this reason, I am familiar with the work-flow and pathways of reasoning used by students preparing their science fair projects. Also, this book could make an ideal gift as a component of a multi-gift package. This book is versatile, in that it can even be read for mere entertainment, such as by people who've derived occasional amusement from watching squirrels in their neighborhood.

PHOTOS AND TABLES. The photographs and tables inside the book include the following:
(1) Eastern gray squirrel
(2) Fox squirrel (light nose, light ears, light tummy, dark face around eyes and between ears, salt & pepper body)
(3) Tassel-eared squirrel (the ears are unusual, in that they look like a pair butter-knives that stick up)
(4) Arizona gray squirrel
(5) Mexican fox squirrel
(6) Gray sequirrel
(7) Skull of eastern gray squirrel
(8) Lower mandible of eastern gray squirrel
(9) Gray squirrel hanging vertically from a branch, showing rotation of ankle joint
(10) Southeastern fox squirrel getting fitted with a radio transmitter
(11) Table 3.1. Data from radio-tracking of 21 different squirrels, showing their preference for various trees (mature longleaf pine, young longleaf pine, hardwood forest, swamp poxosin, fields and scub oak)
(12) Photo of the forest floor, showing how to recognize, "recent cone consumption by . . . squirrels. Note the scattered bracts and cone cores" (page 54)
(13) Photo of male squirrels grooming each other (page 129)

EXAMPLE OF TEXT. The text is easy to read, and it is written on a personal level. What I means is that the writing is not in a style that is distant or overly scholarly. For example, in an account of radio-tracking, we read, "Lori Sherman, our research associate, assembled the . . . tracking antenna . . . then slipped the earphones over her head . . . she then used a sighting compass to pinpoint the direction of the animal . . . the animal had taken up residence in a new next, some distance from the one it had occupied in July. This midsummer shift in space . . . was a pattern we had . . . observed for several animals" (pages 54-55). What I say to this is, "Hey, I did not know that. These fun-facts will inspire me to go to the nearby college library, and look up this topic. I know which journals for doing my search, because the reference section in back of this book lists the best journals for finding articles on squirrel behavior." (That is what I say to this part of the text.)

ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF TEXT. This example from the text is about hiding stores of food. These stores of food are sometimes called "middens." We read, "best known for . . . food-hoarding are the . . . pine squirrels, that is, red squirrels and Douglas' squirrels . . . these small but . . . aggressive and vocal squirrels store huge quantities of conifer cones that they . . . defend against competitors . . . such extensive hords . . . easily recognized by their piles of cone cores and bracts under which new cones are placed, provide a cool . . . environment ideal for storage . . . most hoards contain enough food to last one or two seasons." (page 67). Pages 67-68 disclose two approaches to hoarding, where these are using one location ("larderhoarding") and using dozens or hundreds of locations ("scatterhoarding"). Tree squirrels use scatterhoarding, while pine squirrels use larderhoarding. We learn that cones are stored by larderhoarding, where the cool underground storae area prevents the cones from opening and releasing their seeds. In contrast, nuts and fruits are stored by scatterhoarding. The reason for this, is that nuts and fruits are higher in energy than the food provided by pine cones, and if the hoard of nuts and fruits were stored all in one place, they would attract many other squirrels (not to mention other animals and insects) and would be impossible to defend.

REFERENCES. The book has a 40-page reference section (pages 153-193). The citations are from journals suchas, American Midland Naturalist, Animal Behaviour, Journal of Wildlife Management, Physiological Zoology, and American Naturalist. As I mentioned above, any person with access to a college library might be able to gain access to paper-copies or on-line articles from these and other journals that concern squirrel behavior.
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