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eBook An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere epub

by Gabrielle Walker

eBook An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere epub
  • ISBN: 015603414X
  • Author: Gabrielle Walker
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Earth Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; First edition (August 4, 2008)
  • Pages: 288 pages
  • ePUB size: 1996 kb
  • FB2 size 1529 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf doc txt


Includes bibliographical references (p. -261) and index. The ocean above us - Elixir of life - Food and warmth - Blowing in the wind - The hole story - Mirror in the sky - The final frontier.

Includes bibliographical references (p. A study of Earth's atmosphere traces a journey of scientific discovery, from the Renaissance scientist who realized that we live at the bottom of a dense ocean of air, to a well-meaning inventor who nearly destroys the ozone layer.

She looks at how winds blow, and why they do so along with why and how air protects us from space and the .

She looks at how winds blow, and why they do so along with why and how air protects us from space and the radioactive particles that are bombarding us on a continual basis. Again, weaving the stories of the men and what they found gives and interesting voyage through time as we learn more about the atmosphere. I would strongly recommend this book to anyone, but particularly to those who have any interest in the atmosphere. Walker wrote a short biographical sketch on every featured scientist, and then explained their experiments as they deduced or stumbled into new discoveries about the atmosphere that surrounds us.

An Ocean of Air. Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere. Kittinger had now fallen safely into the lowest part of the atmosphere-the troposphere. The air here isn't so much a protector as a transformer, a thick, life-giving blanket of air, wind, and weather that turns our planet into home. After the bone dryness of space, flecks of moisture from the clouds fogged Kittinger's face plate. He could feel the tug of the thickening air.

In this exuberant book, gifted science writer Gabrielle Walker peels back the layers of our atmosphere with the stories of the . A one-eyed barnstorming pilot finds a set of winds that constantly blow five miles above our heads.

In this exuberant book, gifted science writer Gabrielle Walker peels back the layers of our atmosphere with the stories of the people who uncovered its secrets:, A flamboyant Renaissance Italian discovers how heavy our air really is: The air filling Carnegie Hall, for example, weighs seventy thousand pounds. An impoverished American farmer figures out why hurricanes move in a circle by carving equations with his pitchfork on a barn door.

An Ocean of Air book. Earth’s intrinsic magnetic field extends over ten thousand miles into space and forces the solar wind and other blasts of electromagnetic radiation to part around it. Anything that does manage to get past the magnetic field still has the exosphere, ionosphere, and ozone layer to contend with.

Электронная книга "An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere", Gabrielle Walker. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Related books and articles.

Gabrielle Walker exposes the Earth’s atmosphere for what it is, a restless, dynamic superhero, entrusted with the sacred . An ocean of AIR.

Gabrielle Walker exposes the Earth’s atmosphere for what it is, a restless, dynamic superhero, entrusted with the sacred mission of protecting our planet, nurturing life and even making love possible.

NPR coverage of An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere by. .Chapter 1 The Ocean Above Us Nearly four hundred years ago, in a patchwork of individual fiefdoms that we now call Italy, a revolution of ideas was struggling to take place.

NPR coverage of An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere by Gabrielle Walker. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more. The traditional way to understand the workings of the world-through a combination of divine revelation and abstract reasoning-had begun to come under attack from a new breed. These people called themselves natural philosophers, because the word scientist had not yet been invented.

An Ocean of Air by Gabrielle Walker is an excellent 235 page. With all the talk about the effects of global warming on our atmosphere, we finally have a book that explains what the atmosphere actually is and what each layer (and there are lots of them!) does to protect us. As entertaining- and fascinating- as it is informative, this "natural history of air" is a must read for anyone who wants to join or simply understand the debate.

We don’t just live in the air; we live because of it. It’s the most miraculous substance on earth, responsible for our food, our weather, our water, and our ability to hear. In this exuberant book, gifted science writer Gabrielle Walker peels back the layers of our atmosphere with the stories of the people who uncovered its secrets:• A flamboyant Renaissance Italian discovers how heavy our air really is: The air filling Carnegie Hall, for example, weighs seventy thousand pounds. • A one-eyed barnstorming pilot finds a set of winds that constantly blow five miles above our heads.• An impoverished American farmer figures out why hurricanes move in a circle by carving equations with his pitchfork on a barn door. • A well-meaning inventor nearly destroys the ozone layer. • A reclusive mathematical genius predicts, thirty years before he’s proved right, that the sky contains a layer of floating metal fed by the glowing tails of shooting stars.
Comments: (7)
Cala
Air is a substance that is an absolute must for survival of multi celled animals, yet most of us know little about it. Certainly we know that is has oxygen and hydrogen in it, but I doubt most people have even a vague idea of why the winds blow, how air exerts pressure or how much air actually weighs.

The author has broken the book into two main sections. The first deals with the major discoveries about air and the men who discovered each of them. She goes into detail about how the experiments worked (or didn't) and what each was trying to prove. Along the way, she demonstrates nicely that science is not about a single discovery, but about building on what those before you have done.

The second section is more dedicated to what air does. She looks at how winds blow, and why they do so along with why and how air protects us from space and the radioactive particles that are bombarding us on a continual basis. Again, weaving the stories of the men and what they found gives and interesting voyage through time as we learn more about the atmosphere.

I would strongly recommend this book to anyone, but particularly to those who have any interest in the atmosphere. It is extremely well written and can be easily understood by people with little or no physics experience. Great read that I completely enjoyed!
Windworker
An Ocean of Air is a wonderful and interesting rendition of the discovery of how important our ocean of air is to our earth. And it lays out in some detail the scientific discoveries about air over the centuries. It mentions scientists such as William Ferrell that I had never heard of but who contributed to the world's knowledge of trade winds, polar regions, etc. If you are interested in how the earth's atmosphere both protects and nourishes us as human beings, then you should read this book. I highly recommend it.
Uyehuguita
I've read quite a number of science-popularizing books, and for me, this is one of the best. I bought it thinking the atmosphere was a subject about which I OUGHT to know more, and the more I read this book, the more I wanted to know. Walker brings to life the subject and its researchers so vividly that I didn't want to put the book down. Other five-star reviewers have expressed their delight with the book better than I, so I shall just say that I recommend it very highly to all readers who enjoy learning about not only the science but the sheer adventure of it.
Zaryagan
Gabrielle Walker's "An Ocean of Air: Why the Wind Blows and Other Mysteries of the Atmosphere" is really more about the scientists who studied the atmosphere than it is about the atmosphere. Walker traces mankind's scientific discoveries about the atmosphere from the seventeenth century discovery that air had weight, through the discovery he air or our atmospherof the various gases that comprise the atmosphere, through Marconi's wireless telegraphy (with no mention of Nikolai Tesla), culminating in Van Allen's discovery of the magnetic belts that surround the earth and protect us from the sun's deadly radiation.

The meat of the book, though, focuses on the scientist's who made these discoveries and how they made them. Walker wrote a short biographical sketch on every featured scientist, and then explained their experiments as they deduced or stumbled into new discoveries about the atmosphere that surrounds us. Unfortunately, this book focuses much more on the scientists than the science itself, and the science of the atmosphere almost gets lost as Walker sees to be more in love with some of the eccentric personalities more than the science of the atmosphere. For example, despite the title, there is only one chapter on the wind and weather -- an explanation of the prevalent winds (trade winds, westerlies, and polar easterlies). She even takes us down an odd detour discussing the sinking of the Titanic and the wireless operators on board her, although this had little if anything to do with the rest of the story. In addition to more actual science, this book also would have benefited from many more diagrams than the couple included in the book.

Despite this, this is an entertaining and well-written book, with understandable explanations of the science of the atmosphere when she finally gets around to explaining the hard science. Her underlying story is that our atmosphere is fragile and vital to our existence in more ways than we realize. Although I did enjoy reading this book, at the end I felt that I had learned a lot more about the history of science than I had about "why the wind blows and other mysteries of our atmosphere."
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