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eBook Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado epub

by John Hacker,Randy Turner

eBook Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado epub
  • ISBN: 1477523405
  • Author: John Hacker,Randy Turner
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Environment
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (June 18, 2012)
  • Pages: 406 pages
  • ePUB size: 1338 kb
  • FB2 size 1505 kb
  • Formats mobi lit rtf lrf


By John Hacker telling those stories in "5:41," a earlier book about the Joplin tornado, and in "Spirit of Hope" .

By John Hacker telling those stories in "5:41," a earlier book about the Joplin tornado, and in "Spirit of Hope" these stories tell us more about the people and the Joplin tornado and provided an outlet for them when most needed. With 28 houses of worship destroyed there is still remains a strong belief in God by the people of Joplin. Many Joplin residents have expressed their own personal faith in God to Randy Turner and John Hacker as they recorded these stories, Perhaps the next title if there is a follow up book telling how the people of Joplin "passed it on".

By John Hacker telling those stories in "5:41," a earlier book about the Joplin tornado, and in "Spirit of Hope" .

Hope to see you there! SAT, 16 SEP 2017. Randy Turner Double Book Signing. 24 people interested.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Start by marking Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The EF-5 tornado that ripped through the heart of Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, killed 161 people and damaged one-third of the community. What it did not do was destroy the indomitable nature of the people who live in this city of 50,000. Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado tells the story of how Joplin residents began the rebuilding process almost immediately. On Demand Publishing, LLC-Create Space.

Hi I'm Randy Turner and I'm the author of a new book it's going to be coming out next week called Spirit of Hope the year after the Joplin tornado it's a follow up to a book that reporter John Hacker and I wrote last year 541 stories from the Joplin tornado

Hi I'm Randy Turner and I'm the author of a new book it's going to be coming out next week called Spirit of Hope the year after the Joplin tornado it's a follow up to a book that reporter John Hacker and I wrote last year 541 stories from the Joplin tornado. Today what I'd like to do is read one of the chapters from our new book it's called the house of bricks. It was an odd thought one that should probably have never crossed my mind as I looked at the shelve that it once been in the apartment complex behind the 15th street Wal Mart in Joplin.

In this podcast, teacher and author Randy Turner reads from House of Bricks, a chapter in his book, Spirit of Hope: The .

In this podcast, teacher and author Randy Turner reads from House of Bricks, a chapter in his book, Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado. In the chapter, he tells about returning to his destroyed school two days after the May 22, 2011, Joplin Tornado, and his encounter with the father and sister of a hero who was killed while saving others during the tornado.

Randy Turner and John Hacker are soon to drop far more authentic and community-minded report than anything we've seen so far. Today The Turner Report has the details on the publishing process. Posted by Tony at 6/04/2012 05:00:00 AM. Newer Post Older Post Home. Song Of The Day & About TKC.

The EF-5 tornado that ripped through the heart of Joplin, Missouri, May 22, 2011, killed 161 people and damaged one-third of the community. What it did not do was destroy the indomitable nature of the people who live in this city of 50,000. Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado tells the story of how Joplin residents began the rebuilding process almost immediately. The heroes of this book are many- not just the leaders whose faces became familiar on local and national news, but the volunteers from Joplin and the world. Spirit of Hope, the follow-up book to 5:41: Stories from the Joplin Tornado, is the inspirational story of the city that would not die. The book includes the following: -Original reporting from its authors, veteran newspaper reporter John Hacker and teacher and former reporter Randy Turner -First person accounts from tornado survivors and volunteers -Photos from the tornado and the major events of the following year -Complete texts of important speeches, including those given by President Barack Obama, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, Joplin City Manager Mark Rohr, School Superintendent C. J. Huff, and radio personality Rush Limbaugh Coverage of the tornado, the memorial service one week later, the Extreme Makeover build, Habitat for Humanity, the visit of the 9-11 flag, the improbable day that school started on time only 87 days after 10 schools had been destroyed or damaged, the high school prom, the graduation and the inspiring Day of Unity on the one-year anniversary -Testaments to the important role that faith, both from within and outside of Joplin helped the city's residents recover from the nation's worst tornado in six decades -Official documents, including the final National Weather Service report on the tornado and the Center for Disease Control report on a mysterious fungus that attacked some of those who went through the tornado -A forward written by one of the heroes of May 22, 2011, and the days afterward in Joplin- Fire Chief Mitch Randles Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado, is a stirring tribute to the people of Joplin and the people from across the nation and the world who offered them a hand when they needed it the most.
Comments: (4)
CONVERSE
I was impressed with the stories told by the young students in "Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado" by Randy Turner and John Hacker. Stories are told with youthful courage and bravado. A strong desire to carry on is expressed in spite of adverse situations they had no say in or control over.

Stories are told of the tremendous effort to start school on time in August. Ten out of nineteen schools were either destroyed or heavily damaged. High school classes are conducted in two separate locations one being in a shopping mall and the other in a warehouse building. While most student stories being told have a positive outlook there is one story by a young high school student crying out and wanting, as also expressed by others, the desire for things to go back like they were before the tornado. She hopes to never hear the word tornado again. By speaking out and expressing this thought she displays a level of courage she may not realize she has within her. She knows not hearing the word tornado again will never happen but in reading about it you feel she has courage to over come a negative situation and will go forward with help from her family, teachers and friends. For her the shock of the tornado is still very strong in her mind.

There are many lessons to be learned in the emergency management area as well. The chapter devoted to the Joplin Emergency Managers actions may provide guidance to others as they review existing emergency plans or develop new plans. Spirit of Hope also describes how the hospitals in Joplin are rebuilding and cooperating to provide improved health care services for the rebuilding of Joplin. An explanation of the NOAA/NWS Warning System in effect at the time of the tornado is discussed along with a discussion why the warnings may have been ignored by some and what needs to be done to develop a system which people will have faith in and take appropriate action when necessary. There are many lessons to be learned from the recovery efforts in Joplin.

While first responders do the jobs they are trained to for it is not unusual for them to be concerned about family and friends. John Hacker expressed concern about doing his job when he felt he could be helping more in another way then just hearing people stories and concerns. There are times during an emergency when the things we do become more meaningful later. By John Hacker telling those stories in "5:41," a earlier book about the Joplin tornado, and in "Spirit of Hope" these stories tell us more about the people and the Joplin tornado and provided an outlet for them when most needed.

With 28 houses of worship destroyed there is still remains a strong belief in God by the people of Joplin. Many Joplin residents have expressed their own personal faith in God to Randy Turner and John Hacker as they recorded these stories, Perhaps the next title if there is a follow up book telling how the people of Joplin "passed it on" should be "Spirit of Faith." A book well worth the time to read and keep on the self for future reference.
in waiting
Having visited Joplin now three times since the EF5 from Australia I enjoyed the accurate descriptions and stories I learn something new every book I read and with each visit
Nikojas
Randy Turner and John Hacker's "Spirit of Hope: The Year After the Joplin Tornado" is a follow-up of sorts to their book "5:41: Stories from the Joplin Tornado." Where "5:41" recounts the tragedy, "Spirit of Hope" explores the triumph of the city of Joplin's efforts to move forward and rebuild after the May 22, 2011 F-5 tornado that devastated the city. The book is a compilation of stories, articles, and dozens of photographs. It also includes transcripts of significant speeches given by President Obama and Missouri governor Jay Nixon at the 2011 memorial service for tornado victims and the 2012 Joplin High School graduation, and the final report on the tornado from the National Weather Service.

About half of the 58 chapters are first-hand accounts written by survivors, students, and volunteers. These include stories written by Rebecca Williams, whose daughter Genevive Williams created and managed the Joplin Tornado Info Facebook page that was crucial for providing information to the community in the aftermath of the disaster. It also featured a story from Rose Fogarty, one of the founding members of the volunteer organization St. Lou Crew for Joplin. Other chapters include the speeches made in Joplin by city manager Mark Rohr, Governor Jay Nixon, Joplin school superintendent CJ Huff, and talk show host Rush Limbaugh, at different milestones during the year following the tornado. But some of the most fascinating chapters are those written by the everyday folks, the ones who lost everything but their lives and found a way to move forward.

Most Americans remember exactly where they were, what they were doing, and who they were with during certain tragedies, like Kennedy's assassination or the September 11 attacks; the people of Joplin remember the details of May 22, 2011 in the same way. Andrea Queen wrote about how her family had spent the day going to church, visiting with her grandmother, and watching the Cardinals play the Royals into the 10th inning that Sunday. Not long after the game ended, she and her husband were throwing themselves over their sons to protect them from flying debris and falling tree limbs as the tornado tore through their neighborhood. Rick Nichols was at IHOP, sights set on ordering a "Rise and Shine" breakfast platter, when he and his family had to take cover in the restaurant's kitchens. Rick wrote, "For a solid two to three minutes, our International House of Pancakes became the International House of Prayer as terrified customers and helpless employees alike pleaded with God to save them from the "monster" that was right on top of us." Jeff Wells had been in Joplin, visiting his mother, and was driving home to Texas under blue skies when he heard reports of the storm. He called his mother back at 5:37pm and told her to take cover in her bathtub just before the tornado demolished her home.

After May 22, everyone from Joplin had their own storm survival story, like the ones told by Andrea and Rick and Jeff. Turner and Hacker collected many stories like this for "5:41." What makes "Spirit of Hope" different is the way the stories continue on to tell how people were able to climb out of the rubble and eventually begin to clear out the destruction and focus on reconstruction. Despite living a few hours outside of Joplin, Rick recounted his experience returning to the disaster zone as a volunteer several times in the next year to help rebuild houses for different families. With help from the organization Samaritan's Purse, Jeff was able to clear out his mother's property and salvage 2000 of the original bricks from her home in the hopes of rebuilding someday.

The other chapters of "Spirit of Hope" feature the writing and photography of the book's authors, Randy Turner and John Hacker. Some of these articles were previously published elsewhere; this doesn't decrease their value in "Spirit of Hope." Both of the authors are lifetime area residents with a long history in journalism, and their journalists' perspectives provide a solid foundation for the other chapters of personal submissions. Turner is a teacher at one of Joplin's displaced middle schools and this put him in a unique position to observe directly how the tornado affected the lives of Joplin's students, as well as the school district's response to the disaster. Hacker's words and photographs work together to tell the story of the many steps Joplin has been taking towards healing and rebuilding, including coverage of the Unity Day walk on the one-year anniversary and the Joplin High School 2012 prom.

Together, all of these stories in "Spirit of Hope" are an incredible tribute to the work that has been and continues to be done in Joplin. The tornado claimed 161 lives, but it didn't shake the faith or resolve of the people. It destroyed homes and businesses, but it couldn't touch the community of Joplin. Joplin high school student Laela Zaidi summarized it well in one of her submissions: "The story of what took place on May 22nd will be told as one of resilience, human spirit, and what it truly means to not have a house, but rather a home shared with an entire community."

All in all: "Spirit of Hope" is an interesting and inspiring collection of stories and photos written by and about the people of Joplin and their efforts to rebuild their city. It's not a 200+ page picture book, and I count that as a positive. I definitely recommend reading it.
Dalarin
"Spirit of Hope" documents how a community can be bruised and battered, but not broken. There is masterful storytelling in these pages - the story of a city that endured crisis together. In particular, Chapter 12 by Jeff Wells, "Ground Zero," drew me in with his family's history on Illinois Avenue, with its wonderfully colorful detail, such as the salvaging of bricks from the old House of Lords to build his family's house decades ago. The Wells essay includes some of the most profound examples of family connections prevailing, even in a crowded and chaotic emergency room. Randy Turner's opening essay, "The Spirit of Hope," states so well that the new "normal" after May 22 was going to be a lot different than May 21. John Hacker's first essay captures the immediate quandary of a hard-working and deeply caring journalist - balancing helping those in need with covering the unfolding story. Fortunately, John's sensitive questioning provided a source of contact and even relief in downloading for some very stressed individuals still coming to grips with the devastation. The Unity Walk chapter is vivid - especially City Manager Mark Rohr's declaration about the moving line of people that they stayed together - just as Joplin stayed together. A wonderful book.
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