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eBook Extreme Measures: The Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton epub

by Martin Brookes

eBook Extreme Measures: The Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton epub
  • ISBN: 0747566666
  • Author: Martin Brookes
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Evolution
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC; 1st edition (July 19, 2004)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • ePUB size: 1502 kb
  • FB2 size 1696 kb
  • Formats mobi doc mbr mobi


Sir Francis Galton (1822–1911), a cousin of Charles Darwin, once famously made a beauty map of Britain, counting . Martin Brookes is the author of Fly: The Unsung Hero of Twentieth-Century Science

Sir Francis Galton (1822–1911), a cousin of Charles Darwin, once famously made a beauty map of Britain, counting the number of attractive women he saw in each city (London was number one). This eccentric Victorian snob is one of the greatest forgotten scientists: he invented modern statistics, coined the phrase "nature versus nurture" and popularized fingerprinting as a means of tracking criminals. Martin Brookes is the author of Fly: The Unsung Hero of Twentieth-Century Science. In a previous life he was an evolutionary biologist in the Galton Laboratory at University College London.

Dead on arrival - Lunar orbit - Boy wonder - Growing pains - Wilderness years - The great trek - A comependium for Crusoe - Storm warnings - Extreme states - On the origin of specious - Rabbit stew - Question time - Vital statistics - T. .

Dead on arrival - Lunar orbit - Boy wonder - Growing pains - Wilderness years - The great trek - A comependium for Crusoe - Storm warnings - Extreme states - On the origin of specious - Rabbit stew - Question time - Vital statistics - The gravity of numbers. Tips on fingers - Home improvements - Birmingham's forgotten son. "His measuring mind left its mark all over the scientific landscape. Explorer, inventor, meteorologist, psychologist, anthropologist, and statistician, Galton was one of the great Victorian polymaths.

Extreme Measures book. Count wherever you can" was the motto of Sir Francis Galton's extraordinary life. His measuring mind left its mark all over the scientific landscape. And his obsessive quest for knowledge extended far beyond conventional fields of learning. H. "Count wherever you can" was the motto of Sir Francis Galton's extraordinary life.

Francis Galton, in Martin Brookes's biography, reminds one irresistibly of Gradgrind, forever measuring: the .

Francis Galton, in Martin Brookes's biography, reminds one irresistibly of Gradgrind, forever measuring: the dimensions of noses, the strength of hand grip, the number of minutes he spends looking at a picture his sister has painted for him - and the number of brush strokes required to create a portrait. Quantity determines quality.

Count wherever you can was the motto of Sir Francis Galton's extraordinary life. The book to choose for a general bio of Galton. com User, June 19, 2006. An enjoyable introduction to Sir Francis Galton, the brilliant Victorian who gave us weather maps, fingerprints, and (on a less positive note) eugenics. Galton loved to measure things; wherever he was, whatever he was doing, it seems that he found something in his surroundings to measure.

I registered a book at BookCrossing. I enjoyed reading this biography of the Victorian polymath Francis Galton

I registered a book at BookCrossing. I enjoyed reading this biography of the Victorian polymath Francis Galton. Martin Brookes writing style perfectly suits his subject as he is able to smooth over with humour the areas of Galton's life which are particularly anachronistic to 21st century readers while at the same time creating admiration for his genuine achievements. Perhaps Galton's primary obsession with eugenics is why he is not better remembered. The future horrors that were carried out in its name are always apparent in the parts of the book discussing it.

Francis Galton (1822-1911), the father of eugenics, was also looking for a few good men. Unfortunately, he wasn't one of them. Martin Brookes's "Extreme Measures" is a relentlessly readable book about this comical British bonehead. One has to admire Brookes's guts. The general rule for biographers is to choose a subject who is successful and revered (Winston Churchill, say) as opposed to one who is unsuccessful and reviled (say, Joey Buttafuoco). This biography is in the Buttafuoco tradition.

Hardcover published 2004-10-01 in United Kingdom by Bloomsbury. Alert if: New Price below.

Martin Brookes, Extreme Measures: The Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton (Bloomsbury, 2004). Fiona McCarthy, William Morris (Faber, 1994). William Morris, News from Nowhere & Other Writings, new ed. (Penguin, 2004). 4 Let’s Do It. Giacomo Casanova.

EXTREME MEASURES: The Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton. For cautionary tales, we have the lives of Francis Galton and William Thomson, Lord Kelvin - the subjects of excellent new biographies

EXTREME MEASURES: The Dark Visions and Bright Ideas of Francis Galton. Bloomsbury, £1. 9; 256pp. DEGREES KELVIN: A Tale of Genius, Invention and Tragedy. For cautionary tales, we have the lives of Francis Galton and William Thomson, Lord Kelvin - the subjects of excellent new biographies.

'Count wherever you can' was the motto of Sir Francis Galton's extraordinary life. His measuring mind left its mark all over the scientific landscape. Explorer, inventor, meteorologist, psychologist, anthropologist and statistician, Galton was one of the great Victorian polymaths. But it was in the fledgling field of genetics where he made his most indelible impression. Galton kick-started the enduring nature/nurture debate, and took hereditary determinism to its darkest extreme. Consumed by his eugenic vision, he dreamed of a future society built on a race of pure-breeding supermen. Plagued by illness and poor mental health, Galton often let his obsessions run away with him. He turned tea-making into a theoretical science, counted the brush strokes on his portrait, and created a beauty map of the British Isles, ranking its cities on the basis of their feminine allure. Through the story of Galton's colourful life Martin Brookes examines his scientific legacy and takes us on a fascinating journey to the origins of modern human genetics.
Comments: (5)
Fordregelv
I bough this book because it was cheap. Maybe I should have expected less.

Galton is an interesting person and an important figure in world history. But this slim biography has entirely too much of the author interjecting himself into the narrative to denounce Galton for his unfashionable ideas. Mr. Brookes seems to live in horror of the thought that anyone might think that he thinks the same way as Galton. Over and over he stops the exposition to make it clear that he thinks Galton is some kind of monster.

Who needs all this? No one who would read this book would fail to know that Galton was the founder of Eugenics. Nor would they know that Eugenics was once very popular and now is out of favor. Indeed one of the main reasons why anyone would want to read this book is to try to understand why eugenics was once so powerful an idea. No one cares what Mr. Brookes thinks.

I've never read a biography of Hitler. Is it like this? Do you have to endure the narrator constantly telling you what a bad man Hitler was and how he the author doesn't agree with Hitler or his ideas?

I probably will have to read Galton's own autobiography. But it's pretty expensive.
Cogelv
I always enjoy a book when the author gives descriptive details and assumed anecdotal events that allows the reader to visually enriched their reading experience.
Urreur
An enjoyable introduction to Sir Francis Galton, the brilliant Victorian who gave us weather maps, fingerprints, and (on a less positive note) eugenics. Galton loved to measure things; wherever he was, whatever he was doing, it seems that he found something in his surroundings to measure. His curiosity and enthusiasm for life and discovery make him a sympathetic character even considering his racism, sexism, and classism; he was, after all, a product of his upper-middle-class Victorian environment.

This version of his life story is a good read; choose it instead of Gillham's version unless you want to get into the actual science of what he was doing. One major fault of the Brookes book: it doesn't have an index. Gillham's book has an extensive one.

What would make a Galton biography one step better: more analysis of why Galton became who he was and perhaps a deeper look into his own writings, along with the impact that Galton has on science and psychology today.

For more info on Galton, go to the website [...]
Wyameluna
This book is quite quirky, about an individual largely forgotten today but whose innovations in statistics, data gathering techniques, and survival tips are still used today. The book paints a convincing picture of a man who sought a reputation as a man of science but who was (as all human beings are) filled with rather dark sides that showed in his snobbery and in his mania for collecting data. The book appears a bit too sympathetic to evolution and to the moral difficulties that follow from rejecting God's standards, seeking to condemn Galton for his Nazi-esque eugenic fantasies while not understanding the Darwinian root of such problems. Nonetheless, the book is a fine one about a compelling and unusual figure who will remain obscure to most of those who take advantage of his quirky innovations.
Flamehammer
Fantastic read. Very well written and throughly researched.
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