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eBook The Cartoon Guide to Statistics epub

by Larry Gonick

eBook The Cartoon Guide to Statistics epub
  • ISBN: 0062731025
  • Author: Larry Gonick
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Mathematics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperPerennial; 1 edition (1993)
  • Pages: 230 pages
  • ePUB size: 1192 kb
  • FB2 size 1438 kb
  • Formats azw doc lit mobi


History, Science, Narrative, and India Ink. Primary Menu. Statistics is a student’s bete noire.

History, Science, Narrative, and India Ink. But to us, it’s like magic. Cartoon History of the Universe: Book 1, Book 2, Book 3 Cartoon History of the Modern World: Part 1, Part 2 Cartoon History of the United States. Just for Fun. Kokopelli and Company in the Attack of the Smart Pies Commoners Raw Materials.

The Cartoon Guide to Statistics covers all the central ideas of modern statistics: the summary and display . You will need to study. This book is all about explaining the ideas of stats simply, and it's done with cartoon figures and down to earth examples. Nothing abstract here.

You will need to study. Each section is concise and brief.

The Cartoon Guide to Statistics. by Larry Gonick, Woollcott Smith. To read e-books on the BookShout App, download it on: iPhone/iPad. Bookshout App. We have partnered with Bookshout and recommend using their app as a simple way to read our e-books.

The Cartoon Guide to Statistics covers all the central ideas of modern statistics: the summary and display of data, probability in gambling and medicine, random variables, Bernoulli Trails, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence interval estimation, and much.

The Cartoon Guide to Statistics covers all the central ideas of modern statistics: the summary and display of data, probability in gambling and medicine, random variables, Bernoulli Trails, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence interval estimation, and much more-all explained in simple, clear, and yes, funny illustrations.

I adore Larry Gonick's Cartoon Guide series in general, but that is partly because I clearly identify their purpose. Don't think of this as a College level textbook in statistics because it isn't. Don't think of this as a College level textbook in statistics because it isn't

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lovely book for kids. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Beyond the Black Door.

He has also written The Cartoon History of the United States, and he has adapted the format for a series of co-written guidebooks on other subjects, beginning with The Cartoon Guide to Genetics in 1983

The Cartoon Guide to Algebra.

The Cartoon Guide to Algebra. The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry. Cartoon Guide to Genetics. She refused to be seen carrying a book with this image on its back cover by "some cringy old perv from the 60's.

Cartoon Guides SeriesLarry Gonick. The Cartoon Guide to Physics. This book was included in the materials for a business statistics class at Anderson

Cartoon Guides SeriesLarry Gonick. This book was included in the materials for a business statistics class at Anderson. Bogged down by the reading from the course book and study guide, I didn't even open the cartoon guide for weeks, thinking it was probably too dumbed down to be helpful. Concepts that were very difficult to understand in the course book were elucidated by the excellent examples and explanations in this guide.

If you have ever looked for P-values by shopping at P mart, tried to watch the Bernoulli Trails on "People's Court," or think that the standard deviation is a criminal offense in six states, then you need The Cartoon Guide to Statistics to put you on the road to statistical literacy. The Cartoon Guide to Statistics covers all the central ideas of modern statistics: the summary and display of data, probability in gambling and medicine, random variables, Bernoulli Trials, the Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence interval estimation, and much more--all explained in simple, clear, and yes, funny illustrations. Never again will you order the Poisson Distribution in a French restaurant!
Comments: (7)
Ndyardin
If you had college level statistics this book could serve as a half decent refresher.

But if you are like me and only have basic high school stat-related stuff (basic probability etc), the book becomes frustrating at less than half its lenght because the formulas and concepts start to become more complex are not explained well enough via cartoonish style. The book then becomes annoying and irritating because one formula/concept piles on top of the previous one and from there it is all downhill, at which point I just gave up and will appeal to a more rigorous book which takes its time to explain carefully each point.
Gann
This book is terrible on kindle. You can not enlarge it, you can barely see the words. Worst money ever spent. I can't say if the book is any good BECAUSE I CANT SEE IT
Gaiauaco
Bought this for my 18 year old daughter. She didn't find the content particularly helpful. But she also found the author/illustrator "cringy." On the back of our edition it advertised other books by Larry Gonick, one of which was an illustrated sex guide which reminded me of Mad Magazine style cartooning. She refused to be seen carrying a book with this image on its back cover by "some cringy old perv from the 60's." I was looking for an alternative and perhaps fun way to supplement her statistics class, but this was not it.
MeGa_NunC
Won't pretend to know enough about statistics to claim any expertise, either before OR after reading this book. Nonetheless, I found it very illuminating on several of the basics. Statistics is a quirky little branch of mathematics, with perhaps more than its fair share of counterintuitive phenomena, and a gentle introduction like this one can be very helpful in both revealing and clarifying the finer points: how probability works, and DOESN'T, contrary to some reasonable perceptions; the difference between a mean and a median, and why "average" might not mean what you think it means; and one or two other intriguing phenomena along the way.

Originally published in 1993, the 2005 edition remains largely the same, with a few minor revisions. Other, more recent guides may offer a more up-to-date perspective, but by and large, I'd say this classic little Gonick & Smith collaboration still offers a worth introduction.
GAMER
I've owned this book for a long time and I regularly use it to learn new concepts I need to understand. I also use it as a reference for things I've learned previously but have forgotten a bit. It works for me, but I could see how it may not work for others.

If you're looking for a text book with lots of examples, then this is not your book. If you need someone else to guide you and explain things to you, then this is not your book. This book is about explaining the concepts concisely & simply with real life examples. But just because it's concise, it doesn't mean it's simple. You will need to study.

This book is all about explaining the ideas of stats simply, and it's done with cartoon figures and down to earth examples. Nothing abstract here. Each section is concise and brief. Everything you need for each step is clearly explained and with a little study, graspable. Each section is carefully built on top of the previous one, so because of this grading learning there is never a large leap to a new concept.

I would recommend the book for someone who has previously studied Stats, but needs a quick review.
I would recommend it for use as a quick reference tool. It's easy to find what you want, and since the explanations are brief, you don't need to spend a lot of time in research.
Deeroman
The content is of high quality and complex. This is not yet another statistics for dummies. If you have no background on statistics, you will be challenged reading this book. It doesn't water-down statistical concepts too much. It gives the conceptual (as opposed to totally quantitative view) of statistics in a cartoon format with plenty of well-thought out examples (both real life and hypothetical).

The downfall of this book, of course, is that it doesn't provide statistical practice problems and solutions. In my humble opinion, the best way to learn statistics, or any other quantitative subject, is through lot of practice and mental challenges. Although your conceptual understanding of statistics will be enhanced through this book, your actual applicable knowledge of statistics may still remain stagnant.

This might be a good first book or even a good review of statistics. But certainly, this book is not adequate for those who want to learn statistics for application to real data.

Still, this is immensely well contemplated book and I must congratulate the authors for creating a thought provoking statistics overview book without too many statistical equations and problems. I also enjoyed the cartoons and humor.
Djang
This book is sooooo helpful. I am taking a doctorate biostatistics class and these cartoons really help when coupled with a textbook. There is also a lot of humor in it.
Creative and useful! This book was good pre-reading for an intro stats course I took, and I also re-read it during the course. I would even give it to children (like middle-school or high school), so they don't stupidly fear stats as long as I did, so that stats feels more intuitive to them later, and so that they better understand stats they hear cited in the news (since stats are so often used misleading, OR used accurately but UNDERSTOOD inaccurately by the general public).
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