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eBook Thermodynamics epub

by Enrico Fermi

eBook Thermodynamics epub
  • ISBN: 1607962381
  • Author: Enrico Fermi
  • Genre: Science
  • Subcategory: Physics
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Snowball Publishing (February 2, 2010)
  • Pages: 172 pages
  • ePUB size: 1497 kb
  • FB2 size 1977 kb
  • Formats mobi docx lrf rtf


Enrico Fermi: Father of the Atomic Age Enrico Fermi (1901–1954) received the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his .

Enrico Fermi: Father of the Atomic Age Enrico Fermi (1901–1954) received the 1938 Nobel Prize in Physics "for his demonstrations of new radioactive elements produced by neutron irradiation, and for his related discovery of nuclear reactions brought about by slow neutrons. Just a year before winning the Nobel Prize, Fermi published Thermodynamics, based on a course of lectures at Columbia University, an enduring work which Dover first reprinted in 1956 and which has been in print continuously since then, one of the foundations of Dover's physics program.

very clearly written and well explained thermodynamics fundamentals by great physicist Enrico Fermi.

Indisputably, this is a modern classic of science. very clearly written and well explained thermodynamics fundamentals by great physicist Enrico Fermi. good to those seeking for deep understanding rather than just applications. Based on a course of lectures delivered by the author at Columbia University, the text is elementary in treatment and remarkable for its clarity and organization. Although it is assumed that the reader is familiar with the fundamental facts of thermometry and calorimetry, no advanced mathematics beyond calculus is assumed.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Partial contents: thermodynamic systems, the first law of thermodynamics (application, adiabatic transformations), the second law of thermodynamics (Carnot cycle, absolute thermodynamic temperature, thermal engines), the entropy (properties of cycles, entropy of a system whose states can be represented on a (V, p) diagram, Clapeyron and Van der Waals equations), thermodynamic potentials (free energy, thermodynamic potential at constant.

Just a year before winning the Nobel Prize, Fermi published Thermodynamics, based on a course of lectures at Columbia University, an enduring work which Dover first reprinted in 1956 and which has been in print continuously since then, one of the foundations of Dover's physics program. Both a theorist and an experimentalist, Fermi packed an immense amount of science into his relatively short life, which ended prematurely as a consequence of the radiation he received working on the development of the atomic bomb.

In this classic of modern science, the Nobel Laureate presents a clear treatment of systems, the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, entropy, thermodynamic potentials, and much more. Download (djvu, 1. 8 Mb) Donate Read.

series Dover Books on Physics. series Dover Books on Physics.

56 people found this helpful.

In this classic of modern science, the Nobel Laureate presents a clear treatment of systems, the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, entropy, thermodynamic potentials, and much more. Calculus required.
Comments: (7)
Vishura
This slim volume is based on a course of lectures given by Fermi at Columbia University, New York, in the summer of 1936. The intended audience for this book is clearly the science undergraduate, but given the age of this text, one wonders whether it is more of historical interest than a course book for the modern student.

Fermi's treatment of the fundamentals in the first four chapters - thermodynamic systems, the first law, the second law, and entropy - is attractive in its clarity. He takes his time, and is careful not to lose the reader as he elaborates the concepts. Given the timeless nature of these topics, this part of the book does not suffer on account of its age.

Regarding the subjects presented in the next three chapters - thermodynamic potentials, gaseous reactions and the thermodynamics of dilute solutions - my view is that today's student would be better advised to study a more contemporary text. Important equations, such as the Gibbs-Helmoltz equations, are not mentioned here, and some of the nomenclature and symbols are outdated, which is unlikely to help the student when cross-referencing to contemporary texts and class notes.

The final chapter is devoted to the third law and the entropy constant.

It is evident from the book that Fermi has a liking for theorems and proofs. The Clapeyron equation, for example, is proved in two different ways for no apparent reason other than to show that it can be done, and his derivation of the phase rule extends over six pages. If you're a fan of such rigor, there is much for you to enjoy here.

Overall, I would say that Fermi's book has probably passed its time as a course text for the modern student of thermodynamics, but that for the purposes of deepening understanding of the fundamental concepts addressed in the first four chapters, it still has much to recommend it.
Qus
I took a thermodynamics course a few years ago and am reading this book now to brush up on the subject. I am currently half way through the book. This text is succinct with few examples which I personally enjoy since I can read the entire book fairly quickly. It is well written and hits all the major concepts. Fermi does a nice job of giving interpretations to formulas where appropriate and provides proofs and derivations. This is exactly what I was looking for. The text is excellent as a brush-up text. However, if you are looking for an introductory text, you would be better off buying a larger text which includes more discussion and provides more examples. Also, this particular book has many minor typos. It is never a problem to catch them almost immediately but it is a bit distracting.
Balhala
I bought this to replace the one that I had in 1973. Dense, clear writing; My children and I wore out the old one in three physics majors.
Nagor
First published in 1937, this book is a masterful treatment by a master physicist. Weighing in at just over 150 pages, it manages to cover all the really essential topics in this subject. Furthermore there are a few excellent examples that nicely illustrate the power of thermodynamic methods. The treatment and use of free energy are notable high points in this work.

Sadly, this book is probably still not appropriate for readers who have no knowledge of thermodynamics or the physics of heat more generally, but it would make an ideal second book on the subject. However, The Feynman Lectures are enough to make this book accessible.

The chapter titles give a good idea of the contents:

1) Thermodynamic Systems
2) The First Law of Thermodynamics
3) The Second Law of Thermodynamics
4) The Entropy
5) Thermodynamic Potentials
6) Gaseous Reactions
7) Thermodynamics of Dilute Solutions
8) The Entropy Constant
Mautaxe
I bought this book about two years ago and read through the first two chapters and completed the practice problems. Since then I have gone back to school for a Masters in Mechanical Engineering and am taking an Advanced Thermodynamics course. I pretty-much don't need anything else but this 150 pg. book. It is very clear, to the point, great derivations, and is making my life extremely easy. Get this, it costs only $10 and worth much more.
Doriel
easy read
Dangerous
I believe that Fermi's Thermodynamics, Hawking's The Grand Design and Joos's Theoretical Physics are by far the best of their kind. I used Fermi's and Joos's books many years ago as a student at the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. Years later I gave them to one of my students and bought them recently, mostly for sentimental reasons but also to refresh my memory on certain points of interest. Its nice to have them back on my bookshelf.
Ephraim Ravid
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