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eBook The Courage to Grieve: The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery, and Growth Through Grief epub

by Judy Tatelbaum

eBook The Courage to Grieve: The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery, and Growth Through Grief epub
  • ISBN: 0060911859
  • Author: Judy Tatelbaum
  • Genre: Self-Help
  • Subcategory: Death & Grief
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; 1 edition (June 17, 2008)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1502 kb
  • FB2 size 1543 kb
  • Formats lit azw doc rtf


Judy Tatelbaum gives us a fresh look at understanding grief, showing us that grief is a natural, inevitable human experience, including all . The Courage to Grieve shows us how to live life with the ultimate courage: not fearing death

Judy Tatelbaum gives us a fresh look at understanding grief, showing us that grief is a natural, inevitable human experience, including all the unexpected, intense and uncomfortable emotions like sorrow, guilt, loneliness, resentment, confusion, or even the temporary loss of the will to live. The emphasis is to clarify and offer help, and the tone is spiritual, optimistic, creative and easy to understand. The Courage to Grieve shows us how to live life with the ultimate courage: not fearing death. This book is about so much more than death and grieving it is about life and joy and growth. Скачать (pdf, 710 Kb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

The Courage to Grieve: The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery, and Growth Through Grief. This unusual self-help book about surviving grief offers the reader comfort and inspiration. Each of us will face some loss, sorrow and disappointment in our lives, and The Courage to Grieve provides the specific help we need to enable us to face our grief fully and to recover and grow from the experience.

The Courage to Grieve is a bright candle along a dark, mysterious path on which none of us are equipped to. .

This excellent and sensitive book also sheds considerable light on how each of us can learn to live, unafraid, among the always present reminders of our own unavoidable encounter with the shafts of death.

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The Courage to Grieve book.

The Courage to Grieve book. Judy Tatelbaum gives us a fresh look at understanding grief, showing us that grief is a natural, inevitable human experience, including all the unexpected, intense and uncomfortable emotions like sorrow, guilt, loneliness, resentment, confusion, or even the temporary loss of the will to live.

The Courage to Grieve : The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery, and Growth Through Grief.

The Courage to Grieve: Creative Living, Recovery and Growth Through Grief Judy Tatelbaum . attended both Syracuse University and the Simmons College School of Social Work in Boston

attended both Syracuse University and the Simmons College School of Social Work in Boston. She worked for several years as a psychiatric social worker at the Payne Whitney Clinic of New York/Cornell Medical Center; the Columbia University School of Social Work; and the Massachusetts Mental Health Center. She now lives in Carmel Valley, California, where she has her private practice. Библиографические данные.

The Courage to Grieve shows us how to live life with the ultimate courage .

The Courage to Grieve shows us how to live life with the ultimate courage: not fearing death.

Judy Tatelbaum (2009). The Courage to Grieve: The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery, and Growth Through Grief, ., Harper Collins. 5. Another misconception is that if we truly loved someone, we will never finish with our grief, as if continued sorrow is a testimonial to our love. Judy Tatelbaum (2009). Pain, Loss, Grieving.

Author(s) : Judy Tatelbaum. Publisher : Vermilion. Pages : 320. Category : Grief and Bereavement. Category 2 : Gestalt Therapy. There is advice on how to help oneself and others to get through the immediate experience of death and the grief that follows, as well as how to understand the special grief of children.

This unusual self-help book about surviving grief offers the reader comfort and inspiration. Each of us will face some loss, sorrow and disappointment in our lives, and The Courage to Grieve provides the specific help we need to enable us to face our grief fully and to recover and grow from the experience. Although the book emphasizes the response to the death of a loved one, The Courage to Grieve can help with every kind of loss and grief.

Judy Tatelbaum gives us a fresh look at understanding grief, showing us that grief is a natural, inevitable human experience, including all the unexpected, intense and uncomfortable emotions like sorrow, guilt, loneliness, resentment, confusion, or even the temporary loss of the will to live. The emphasis is to clarify and offer help, and the tone is spiritual, optimistic, creative and easy to understand. Judy Tatelbaum provides excellent advice on how to help oneself and others get through the immediate experience of death and the grief that follows, as well as how to understand the special grief of children. Particularly useful are the techniques for completing or "finishing" grief--counteracting the popular misconception that grief never ends. The Courage to Grieve shows us how to live life with the ultimate courage: not fearing death. This book is about so much more than death and grieving it is about life and joy and growth.

Comments: (7)
Hinewen
Whereas this books offers much detailed information on important aspects of grief and grieving, it somehow gets so lost in its pedantic style it forgets to offer the comfort that so many mourners seek when they read such a book. Although a Masters level social worker myself, I found the book a difficult read in its small print and wordiness. There also seems to a lack of emphasis at turning to the spirtual for comfort and support. There are not enough detailed examples of people who have lost loved ones and how they came to cope with these losses. Also philosophically I believe that if you love someone, there IS no "finishing" with that loss, that you simply have to learn to live with it. The book seems to imply that total finishing is possible and that I would debate. The author maintains that "finishing is acknowledging that the person is gone" and the the mourner knows that "I am not going to see you again." This can hardly be seen as comforting. Much better books that I would recommend for those are deeply grieving a lost loved one are the Kubler-Ross book On Grief and Grieving: Finding the Meaning of Grief Through the Five Stages of Loss and the Bob Deits book Life After Loss: A Practical Guide to Renewing Your Life After Experiencing Major Loss.
Zuser
When I lost my father a friend lent me this book. At first, I was skeptical, but after reading it, I would highly recommend it to anyone dealing with any kind of grief or loss. I felt like I was completely alone in the world and this made me feel like not only was I not alone, but what I was feeling wasn't crazy or wrong. It helped me through one of the most difficult times of my life and now, I give it to anyone I know who has experienced a loss.
Still In Mind
This book just added to my grief. It was very upsetting. Although some information is useful (two stars), I found Tatlebaum's linear, Three-Steps-And-You're-Finished approach disturbing, if not cruel. Near the end of the book we learn she is a Gestalt Therapist. This explains a great deal. ("Finishing" is a Gestalt concept.) Confronting an empty chair representing lost loved ones, is not my idea of "healing". It was useful to her after grieving her brother for twenty years with denied anger, so I understand why she is passionate about this approach. I just do not see Gestalt methods as appropriate in most bereavement situations. Gestalt Therapy emerged in the 50's with an emphasis on "personal responsibility." (No whining.) I resent Tatelbaum's assertion: one reason we continue to feel pain for our lost loved ones is because we buy into society's edict, "If I really loved you, I must grieve you forever." (Think: Queen Victoria pining for long-dead Albert), or because it makes us "feel special when people pay attention to us". Therapy like this simply adds insult to injury, the pain of unfair accusation to genuine grief. While she gives lip-service support for patience and self care, she really expects us to GET OVER IT ALREADY through "hope, willingness, and expectations." As another reviewer pointed out, after more than a year, if we still miss our loved one and the feel pain of loss, readers are told that our grieving is probably "unsuccessful". (Tatelbaum implies we are playing the victim among other things.) This is kind of Neo-Brutal Therapy does more harm than good. Both my parents died in the last 16 months. My mother died suddenly of heart failure. After she crossed the Rainbow Bridge my father wasted away --body, mind, heart, and spirt --- millimeter by millimeter, day by day. It took more than a year. It was heartbreaking. Based on other losses in my life, I believe grieving is a cycle, not a linear process. The pain cycles lessen in intensity eventually over time, but they are unending. Just as the relationships are eternal. ANY loss can be the cause of grief. We can accept the loss while still feeling the pain. We can feel the pain and still move forward. I will follow the advice of other reviewers and purchase more positive guides.
Haal
I bought this book to read for a class assignment. It proved not just useful for that but also to uncover areas of grief I did not consider when experiencing in the past as well as suggestions to incorporate when grieving in the future. It was also a relatively short read, concise and clearly written.
Sirara
My husband pasted away after three years of chemotherapy. We had been married 53 years so I was at a total loss. This book was easy to relate to and helped me through a very difficult time. In fact I read it twice. I purchased another copy and gave it to my neighbor who also lost her husband and have encouraged another friend to read it. If you can't attend a group therapy, this book will help you though your grief.
Vichredag
Judy Tatelbaum's book "The Courage to Grieve" is extremely helpful to anyone going through the excruciating pain of losing a loved one - a wonderful resource to navigate and ride the waves of inevitable grief.
Siratius
Received quickly, in great shape as described. I was glad to find books that help my parents with the loss of my brother, it's been a year. My dad just blocks it out, my mother is seriously still grieving. Bought the books for them, but ready them myself first, and helps me to understand their needs during this sorrowful time.
I was given this book after my husband died unexpectedly in an auto accident at 56 years old. No other book helped me more to get through my grief. I read it and re-read it and highlighted points I needed to read again. I read parts of the book to my three sons which helped them to understand that is was okay to see their mother cry and also alright to cry themselves. Since that time in 1989, I have purchased and given this book to many others who have lost loved ones. My two sons are financial advisers and manage many older clients, and they have purchased large supplies to give clients who have lost loved ones. I strongly recommend this book.
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