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eBook The Magus of the North: J.G. Hamann and the Origins of Modern Irrationalism epub

by Isaiah Berlin,Henry Hardy

eBook The Magus of the North: J.G. Hamann and the Origins of Modern Irrationalism epub
  • ISBN: 0374196575
  • Author: Isaiah Berlin,Henry Hardy
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Philosophy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st American ed edition (May 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 143 pages
  • ePUB size: 1520 kb
  • FB2 size 1479 kb
  • Formats rtf txt lrf lrf


Isaiah Berlin, with admirable brevity (144 pp. cover to cover), sketches the life, beliefs (particularly with regard to God .

Sir Isaiah Berlin here explores the world & the ideas of a man he calls the Enlightenment's "most passionate .

Sir Isaiah Berlin here explores the world & the ideas of a man he calls the Enlightenment's "most passionate, consistent, extreme, & implacable enemy," a philosopher whom he considers perhaps the only "wholly original critic of modern times. Hamann was an eccentric Prussian thinker of the 18th century whose peculiar & difficult work was cherished by Kant, Goethe & other luminaries, yet to the 20th century this self-styled Magus of the North is all but unknown.

Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on June 26, 2009. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Similar books and articles. Isaiah Berlin - 2000 - Princeton University Press. Patterns of European Irrationalism, From Source to Estuary: Johann Georg Hamann, Lev Shestov and Anton Chekhov – on Both Sides of Reason. Three Critics of the Enlightenment: Vico, Hamann, Herder. Johann Georg Hamann Und England Hamann Und Die Englischsprachige Aufklärung : Acta des Siebten Internationalen Hamann-Kolloquiums Zu Marburg/Lahn 1996. Bernhard Gajek - 1999. Olga Tabachnikova - unknown. Urkunde Und Experiment Neuztliche Naturwissenschaft Im Horizont Einer Hermeneutischen Thelogie der Schöpfung Bei Johann Georg Hamann.

Berlin, Isaiah (2000). Three Critics of the Enlightenment. Cherniss,, Joshua; Hardy, Henry (2008-02-01). In Zalta, Edward N. (e. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Sir Isaiah Berlin here explores the world and the ideas of a man he calls .

Sir Isaiah Berlin here explores the world and the ideas of a man he calls the Enlightenment's "most passionate, consistent, extreme, and implacable enemy," a philosopher whom he considers perhaps the only "wholly original critic of modern times. Hamann was an eccentric Prussian thinker of the eighteenth century whose peculiar and difficult work was cherished by Kant, Goethe, and other luminaries, yet to the twentieth century this self-styled Magus of the North is all but unknown.

One must be grateful to Isaiah Berlin for his insightful article, The Magus of the North. It will do much to rescue Johann Georg Hamann from the unfortunate obscurity to which he has generally been relegated

One must be grateful to Isaiah Berlin for his insightful article, The Magus of the North. It will do much to rescue Johann Georg Hamann from the unfortunate obscurity to which he has generally been relegated. However, it is a pity that Berlin has chosen to ignore the radical revision that Hamann’s relation to the eighteenth century Enlightenment has undergone in recent years. The consensus today among Hamann-scholars is that he too was, to a great extent, a child of the Enlightenment, and certainly no obscurantist enemy of that movement.

com: The Magus of the North: . Berlin makes clear from the beginning that he has little sympathy for Hamann, despite his importance as an enemy of the Enlightenment, leader in the romantic revolt against universalism and the scientific method, and spearhead of the rise of modern irrationalism.

Briefly traces the life of the eighteenth century German philosopher, discusses his major ideas, and looks at the relevance of his work today
Comments: (6)
Cobyno
This book is better than these reviews let on. It is true that the book is not a happy look at Hamann's work, but Berlin is no dummy. He has read Hamann and for those of us who would appreciate Hamann's Lutheran hedonism, he doesn't spoil it. Through the cracks one can see and understand Hamann's work through Berlin's lucid and warm style. I loved this book, even though the one or two notes about how he led to Kafka, surrealism, and Nazism, were not well thought-out.

Berlin's Judaism, and the whole Luther to Hitler idea, seem to have allowed from some not very well critiqued notions. Hamann knew Hebrew very well, and has many many positive things to say about the OT. But Berlin couldn't help but give him a whack.

I really enjoyed this book. I couldn't put it down in spite of its flaws.
Mash
rec'd in good condition
bobb
b
Mr.Savik
This book was recommended to me by Amazon, based on my browsing history. I decided to borrow it first from my local library, to see if this is something that would interest me, and that I would read repeatedly. It did, and I would.

I consider myself above average in my knowledge of European intellectual history. But I had never heard of Johann G. Hamann (1730-1788) before. I discovered that he was an important force in the anti-Enlightenment in Germany, having a deep influence on such figures as Herder, Goethe, Lessing, and Mendelssohn, and later Hegel and Kierkegaard.

Hamann was anti-Reason, -Kant, -Voltaire, -metaphysics, -philosophical system, and was generally distrustful of knowledge or experience too far removed, intellectually and rationally, from the daily concerns of the individual and his experience of God. He saw himself as a gadfly like Socrates, whose duty was to instill some sense into 18th century Prussian intellectual life and save them from godlessness. He was a kind of anti-rationalist, Christian proto-existentialist.

Isaiah Berlin, with admirable brevity (144 pp. cover to cover), sketches the life, beliefs (particularly with regard to God and theories of knowledge, language, creativity, and politics), and influence of this fascinating man. It is a book I enjoyed immensely, that I want to own so that I can read and study it again, and that I recommend to anyone with even a slight interest in philosophy. It is written in a very accessible style.

A note about the critics: I didn’t get the sense that Berlin had anything but respect and admiration for Hamann; he repeatedly praised Hamann’s originality, philosophical depth, and influence (I think he even called him a genius several times). I don’t understand why some reviewers think that Berlin considered Hamann to be unintelligent.

I also think some critics have exaggerated Berlin’s tie between Hamann and National Socialism. Berlin made a few vague comments in this direction, but it was less asserting a direct linkage, and more grouping Hamann within a larger anti-rational movement in Germany, which also included the later Nazis. It is certainly true that there were many forces in Germany leading to Nazism, one of which was that they never experienced the Enlightenment with the depth and force that, say, England and France did. Think of it as a Venn diagram with a circle for the Nazis, and a circle for Hamann, and anti-rationalism being the circle which shows where they intersect.
Rivik
This is apainful review for me to write, as I admire many of Berlins writings. However, this book does little more than to reveal Berlins inability to comprehend Christian mysticism or religous belief. Hamann scholars(and one of my best friends is a Hamann scholar) are almost unanimous in dismissing Berlins book. Hamann was not "stupid" ( such well known intellectual lightweights as Goethe,Kant, Kierkegaard and Hegel regarded him as a genius.)nor was he an 'irrationalist', unless it is "rational' to worship "reason". Yes, Hamann questioned many of the shibboleths of progressive, enlightened "humanism"..they could stand some criticism. To suggest some sort of genealogical linkage between Hamann and the Third Reich is, to say the least,absurd. At least one could hope that some reader might turn from reading Berlins little essay and turn to Hamanns writings, in all their wonderful strangeness, or at even better to hunt down Ronald Gregor Smith fascinating, out of print book, J.G. Hamann,Philosopher of christian Existence, or Gwen Griffith Dickson scholarly, but frightfully expensive, Hamanns Meta-Critique of Reason. Let me just say in closing that Michael Oakeshott had a point when he called Isaiah Berlin "A veritable Pagannini of Ideas."
Hanelynai
Berlin is an intellectual hack. This book is irrefutable evidence of precisely that claim.
Pumpit
Read the delightful and uplifting book about J.G. Hamann called, "J.G. Hamann: A Study in Christian Existentialism" written by Ronald Gregor Smith. It shows the real man behind the mystery and the beauty of his faith in Christ. This book is not worth the time or struggle to get through the author's most lengthy discourse about absurd and ludicrous associations between what Hamann wrote and the Nazi oppressors!
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