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eBook Salt of the Earth: The Political Origins of Peasant Protest and Communist Revolution in China epub

by Ralph A. Thaxton

eBook Salt of the Earth: The Political Origins of Peasant Protest and Communist Revolution in China epub
  • ISBN: 0520203186
  • Author: Ralph A. Thaxton
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of California Press; 1st edition (August 4, 1997)
  • Pages: 454 pages
  • ePUB size: 1564 kb
  • FB2 size 1197 kb
  • Formats docx mbr lrf lit


Thaxton's work explodes the simplistic dichotomies that have framed too many discussions of the Revolution itself and of the longer-term relationship between the CCP and the rural population.

Thaxton's work explodes the simplistic dichotomies that have framed too many discussions of the Revolution itself and of the longer-term relationship between the CCP and the rural population. Salt of the Earth heralds a new post-Cold War era in our understanding of the Chinese Revolution. -Kenneth Pomeranz, author of The Making of a Hinterland

Издательство: University of California Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Издательство: University of California Press. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. História da Reforma.

Salt of the Earth book. In this pathbreaking study, Ralph A. Thaxton, J. provides a fresh and strikingly original interpretation of the political and economic origins of the October revolution. On October 1, 1949, a rural-based insurgency demolished the Nationalist. Salt of the Earth is based on direct interviews with the village people whose individual and collective protest activities helped shape the nature and course of the Chinese revolution in the deep countryside.

In this pathbreaking study, Ralph A. ISBN13:9780520203181.

Salt of the Earth offers an important perspective on the revolutionary process in the 1930s that draws upon the complex . Ralph Thaxton's goal of giving centrality to peasant resistance in the narrative of revolution is laudable.

Salt of the Earth offers an important perspective on the revolutionary process in the 1930s that draws upon the complex relationship among peasant society, the Guomindang (GMD) state, and Communist revolutionaries.

Thaxton, Salt of the Earth. D. Filtzer, Soviet Workers and Late Stalinism: Labour and the Restoration of the Stalinist System after World War II (Cambridge, 2002), pp. 34-9. The Political Origins of Peasant Protest and Communist Revolution in China (Berkeley, 1997), ch. 9. 659. K. Hartford, Repression and Communist Success: The Case of Jin-Cha-Ji, 1938-1943, in K. Hartford and S. Goldstein (ed., Single Sparks. China’s Rural Revolutions (Armonk, NY, 1989), p. 27. 660. Bianco, Responses, pp. 181-2.

The Political Origins of Peasant Protest and Communist Revolution in China. by Ralph A. Thaxton Jr. Published August 4, 1997 by University of California Press. Anyone seeking to understand the development of agrarian-based political upheaval must first understand peasant China's modern history, for it was in China that peasants first defeated the plans of twentieth-century state makers through insurgency and revolution.

Salt of the Earth: The Political Origins of Peasant Protest and Communist Revolution in China. ThaxtonJr. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: University of California Press, 1997. Michael Gasster (a1).

Chicago Distribution Center. The New Silk Road and China’s Evolving Grand Strategy. Leverett et al. Grapes of Wrath: Twisting Arms to Get Villagers to Cooperate with Agribusiness in China. Luo et al. Framing the Funeral: Death Rituals of Chinese Communist Party Leaders. The Use of Comrade as a Political Instrument in the Chinese Communist Party, from Mao to Xi. Kohlenberg. In the Name of the Public: Environmental Protest and the Changing Landscape of Popular Contention in China. Steinhardt et al. 1427 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637. China Turned Rightside Up: Revolutionary Legitimacy in the Peasant World. University of California Press, 1997. Yale University Press, 1983.

On October 1, 1949, a rural-based insurgency demolished the Nationalist government of Chiang-kai Shek and brought the Chinese Communists to national power. How did the Chinese Communists gain their mandate to rule the countryside? In this pathbreaking study, Ralph A. Thaxton, Jr., provides a fresh and strikingly original interpretation of the political and economic origins of the October revolution.Salt of the Earth is based on direct interviews with the village people whose individual and collective protest activities helped shape the nature and course of the Chinese revolution in the deep countryside. Focusing on the Party's relationship with locally esteemed non-Communist leaders, the author shows that the Party's role is best understood in terms of its intimate connections with local collective activism and with existing modes of local protest, both of which were the product of rural people acting on their own grievances, interests, and goals.The author's collection and use of oral histories—from the last remaining eyewitnesses—and written corroborative materials is a remarkable achievement; his new interpretation of why China's rural people supported and joined the Communists in their quest for state power is dramatically different from what has come before. This book will stimulate debates on the genesis of popular mobilization and the growth of insurgency for decades to come.
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