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eBook Japan's Imperial Diplomacy: Consuls, Treaty Ports, and War in China, epub

by Barbara J. Brooks

eBook Japan's Imperial Diplomacy: Consuls, Treaty Ports, and War in China, epub
  • ISBN: 0824820622
  • Author: Barbara J. Brooks
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ of Hawaii Pr (July 2000)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1492 kb
  • FB2 size 1520 kb
  • Formats doc mbr azw mobi


She focuses on the China service diplomats who initially negotiated Japan's interests in China's treaty ports and who played roles in decision-making in Kasumigaseki diplomacy in the aftermath of the Marco Polo Bridge Incident of 7 July 1937.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy: Consuls, Treaty Ports, and War in China 1895-1938. Studies of the East Asian Institute, Columbia University. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2000. She focuses on the China service diplomats who initially negotiated Japan's interests in China's treaty ports and who played roles in decision-making in Kasumigaseki diplomacy in the aftermath of the Marco Polo Bridge Incident of 7 July 1937. The author also analyzes the China service diplomats in the context of the Anglo-American diplomats of the 1920s as well as Anglo-oriented fellow Japanese diplomats and Axis-oriented Japanese diplomats of the 1930s.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Japan's Imperial Diplomacy: Consuls, Treaty Ports, and War in China, 1895-1938 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy profiles this distinct strain of China service diplomat, while providing a comprehensive . The Development of the Career Diplomat Nurturing China Expertise. 45. The Japanese Consul in China. 79. The Gaimushos Loss in the Manchurian Incident. 117. The Path to War The Gaimushos Continuing Loss of Control in China Affairs.

Japan’s Imperial Diplomacy. A Study of the East Asian Institute Columbia University. Japan’s Imperial Diplomacy Consuls, Treaty Ports, and War in China 1895–1938. University of Hawai‘i Press Honolulu. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0–8248–2062–2 (alk. paper)-ISBN 0–8248–2325–7 (pbk. : alk. paper) 1. Japan-Foreign relations-China.

Japan's First Modern War: Army and Society in the Conflict with China .

Japan's First Modern War: Army and Society in the Conflict with China, 1894-1895. Until 1912 China was governed by the Emperor, and in particular the Qing dynasty. The period of wars protracted for all the second part of the 19th century, when China, constantly defeated, was forced to accept several unfair and unequal treaties. Starting with the Treaty of Nanjing, signed at the end of the Opium War (1839–1842), and ending with the Sino-Japanese war, these treaties contributed.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy : Consuls, Treaty Ports and War in China, 1895-1938. by Barbara J. Brooks. Ishii was the most notable member of a group of middle-level diplomats who, having served in China, strongly advocated that Japan adopt policies in harmony with China's rising nationalism and national interests.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy profiles this distinct strain of "China service diplomat," while providing a comprehensive look at the institutional history . 5 The Path to War The Gaimushō’s Continuing Loss of Control in China Affairs.

Japan's Imperial Diplomacy profiles this distinct strain of "China service diplomat," while providing a comprehensive look at the institutional history and internal dynamics of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and its handling of China affairs in the years leading up to and through World War I. The reduction in Gaimushō authority in affairs in the Northeast did not end with the Manchurian Incident nor did competition in Tokyo for authority in China affairs. The subsequent ongoing decline of Gaimushō legitimacy and influence in the 1930s had its basis in several trends.

By BARBARA J. Published: 1 September 2001. by Cambridge University Press (CUP). in The China Quarterly. The China Quarterly, Volume 167; doi:10. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Published by H-US-Japan (August, 2002). Of Consuls and Colonels. No single institution created Japan's prewar empire. This revolt resulted in a greater recognition for the significance of Japan's China policy and a concomitant increase in the stature of those who implemented it. These adjustments, however, did not lead to a more cohesive ministry-although the China hands had greater voice within the ministry, they continued to occupy lower positions. Moreover, Brooks notes that some who contributed to the changing of Japanese policies in the 1930s were also among the dissatisfied in the earlier era.

In November 1937, Ishii Itaro, head of the Japanese Foreign Ministry's Bureau of Asiatic Affairs, reflected bitterly on the decline of the Ministry's influence in China and his own long and debilitating struggle to guide China policy. Ishii was the most notable member of a group of middle-level diplomats who, having served in China, strongly advocated that Japan must adopt policies in harmony with China's rising nationalism and national interests. This volume profiles this distinct strain of "China service diplomat", while providing a comprehensive look at the institutional history and internal dynamics of the Japanese foreign ministry and its handling of China affairs in the years leading up to and through World War II. Moving from an examination of a wide range of primary sources, including the archives of the Japanese Foreign Ministry, memoirs, diaries and speeches, the author offers integrated interpretations of Japanese imperialism, diplomacy, and the bureaucratic restructuring of the 1930s that was fundamental to Japan's version of fascism and the move toward war.
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