» » Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist Discipline, Second Edition: Factory Women in Malaysia (SUNY series in the Anthropology of Work)

eBook Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist Discipline, Second Edition: Factory Women in Malaysia (SUNY series in the Anthropology of Work) epub

by Carla Freeman,Aihwa Ong

eBook Spirits of Resistance and Capitalist Discipline, Second Edition: Factory Women in Malaysia (SUNY series in the Anthropology of Work) epub
  • ISBN: 1438433557
  • Author: Carla Freeman,Aihwa Ong
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SUNY Press; 2 edition (August 25, 2010)
  • Pages: 294 pages
  • ePUB size: 1765 kb
  • FB2 size 1709 kb
  • Formats txt rtf doc mbr


I have used Ong's book in a number of classes (I am an anthropologist)

Based on intensive fieldwork, the book captures a moment of profound transformation for rural Muslim women even as their labor helped launch Malaysia's rise as a tiger economy. I have used Ong's book in a number of classes (I am an anthropologist).

Aihwa Ong is Professor in the Department of Anthropology . Paperback: 286 pages.

Aihwa Ong is Professor in the Department of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley. Series: SUNY series in the Anthropology of Work.

On the other hand, studies of women working in the Colombian flower industry (Meier 1999), in the fresh vegetable industry in Kenya (Dolan and Sutherland 2002) and in factory work in Bangladesh (Kabeer 2000), India (Gandhi and Shah n., Indonesia (Wolf 1992), China (Lee 1998) and Malaysia (Ong 1987) all reported increased social interactions among.

ISBN - 10 : 0887063802.

Based on intensive fieldwork, the book captures a moment of profound transformation for rural Muslim women even as their labor helped launch Malaysia s rise as a tiger economy.

Aihwa Ong is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Ong presents how the lives and power of women have changed in Malaysia with the explosion of jobs that they can do (and often, are the only applicants for). Ong follows the changes in the family dynamic (girls can now be breadwinners and are much more valuable to their households, drastically changing their pull, rights and the marriage process), and in the culture at large. Aihwa Ong is Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Factory Women in Malaysia Aihwa Ong State University of New York Press Published by State.

Suny the Anthropology of Work.

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New edition of Aihwa Ong’s classic ethnographic study of Malay women factory workers.
Comments: (6)
riki
VIVA LA RESITANCE!
Mayno
Good book!!
Kiutondyl
Book came as expected and packaging was good.
Zololmaran
Aihwa Ong takes an anthropological perspective in defining the occurences of spirit posessions and mass hysteria among the female factory workers in malaysia. By illustrating the evolution of the malaysian economy from agrarian to industrial, disintegration of the traditional family norms and reifying the responsibility of kin, the stage is set to portray the culture shock. the author uses case studies to show the diverse changes that affect the family and the distribution of economic responsibility. further, the conflict between the factory operators and the control imposed on them by upper levels of management adds to the tension that these factory workers must cope with. as these women use religious responses instead of more pragmatic methods to confront the issues of corporate and social control that are enacted upon them, they maginify the cultural perceptions that women are the spiritually susceptible, therefore, enabling a break and a vent for the archived anger and frustration that this economic system has smelted. I found the book informative and a better resource for sociological studies than anthropological endeavors, easy to read, and a worthy text for an Anthropology 101 or Sociology 111 course.
Dawncrusher
I have used Ong's book in a number of classes (I am an anthropologist). I use it as an example of the impact of globalization and industrialization on women. I like it because Ong specifically addresses this issue in the book: she gives an overview of the historical processes that have shaped Malaysia (i.e., industrialization didn't just happen in a vacuum: there were historical precedents), and she clearly outlines how industrialization has reshaped gender relations in rural Malaysian society.

However, her prose can be very difficult to wade through at times. Her theoretical approach is postmodernist, relying heavily on Foucault. There's a lot of jargon here, and undergraduates can be put off by that. In class, I have to help them with a bit of an overview of postmodernism and Foucault more specifically. For the general reader, a book like Postmodernism for Beginners (which uses comics to explain theory) might be useful!

I'd like to add that I disagree with Palanisamy Ramasamy's review: she writes that Ong argues that returning to the past (the "old tranquil kampung life") is the solution for women. I don't think that that is what Ong argues at all. I don't think she sees "traditional" kampung life as being all that positive a thing for women; but she also argues that industrialization ("modernity") -- while providing kampung women with some escape from rigid gender roles -- has produced a whole new set of problems for kampung women as they challenge those roles. My impression is that kampung women can be "stuck between a rock and a hard place" as Malaysia attempts to transition from what is basically a subsistence/horticultural society into an industrialized society (for better or worse).

However, I do think she's right to say that Ong's discussion of resistance is pretty thin: one wonders if women don't resist in other ways, and/or if they even consider spirit possession a form of resistance. There is no evidence presented that they do. Ong doesn't even seem sure of that. Thus, the book ends on an ambiguous note.
Dancing Lion
Ong has come out with an interesting and well-researched piece on the subject of female resistance. But unfortunately, she only focusses on mass hysteria as the most commonly articulated resistance among young Malay women. But what about other forms of resistances such as overt and collective. What is the solution for women? Ong is under the impression that the old tranquil kampung life is the best remedy. Can these workers go back to the past? Is there a time-tunnel?
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