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eBook A Divided Life: Biography of Donald Maclean epub

by Robert Cecil,Lord Annan

eBook A Divided Life: Biography of Donald Maclean epub
  • ISBN: 0370311299
  • Author: Robert Cecil,Lord Annan
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Bodley Head Ltd; First Edition edition (October 20, 1988)
  • Pages: 212 pages
  • ePUB size: 1595 kb
  • FB2 size 1842 kb
  • Formats doc docx mbr azw


A Divided Life" also aims to shed light on Maclean's breakdown in Cairo and the disastrous impact on Anglo-American relations of his defection in 1951.

A Divided Life" also aims to shed light on Maclean's breakdown in Cairo and the disastrous impact on Anglo-American relations of his defection in 1951. Robert Cecil was created a Companion of St Michael and St George in 1959. He has also written "The myth of the Master Race" and "Hitler's Decision to Invade Russia".

In this illuminating biography of Donald Maclean, author Robert Cecil draws on a close family connection and a path that in many ways followed that of Maclean’s. They went to the same children’s parties because their respective families knew each other well. Cecil followed MacLean to Cambridge, but they weren’t there at the same time. They were later to become colleagues in the Foreign Office/Diplomatic Service.

Robert Cecil was born in Southbourne, a suburb of Bournemouth, Dorset in southern England on 25 March 1913 A Divided Life: a biography of Donald Maclean (The Bodley Head Ltd, 1988).

Robert Cecil was born in Southbourne, a suburb of Bournemouth, Dorset in southern England on 25 March 1913 During his career in the diplomatic service, from 1945 to 1967, Cecil served in the Foreign and Commonwealth Office; as First Secretary in Washington, . as a Counsellor and Consul General in Europe, as Director-General of British Information Services, and latterly as Head of the Cultural Relations Department at the Foreign Office. He had been made a Companion. A Divided Life: a biography of Donald Maclean (The Bodley Head Ltd, 1988).

Items related to A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald MacLean

Items related to A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald MacLean. Robert Cecil; Lord Annan A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald MacLean. ISBN 13: 9780370311296. A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald MacLean. Robert Cecil; Lord Annan.

oceedings{Cecil1988ADL, title {A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald Maclean}, author {Robert Cecil}, year {1988} }. Robert Cecil. The early years Cambridge and comintern the citadel betrayed Paris and world war Washington and Cold War Cairo - eastern Reproaches his last post final night exit the miseries of Melinda Moscow - the broken partnership exile's end. Save to Library.

a biography of Donald Maclean. by Robert Cecil, Lord Annan.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove A divided life from your list? A divided life. a biography of Donald Maclean.

by Robert Cecil, Lord Annan. ISBN 9780370311296 (978-0-370-31129-6) Hardcover, Vintage/Ebury (A Division of Random House Group), 1988. Find signed collectible books: 'A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald MacLean'. Hitler's decision to invade Russia, 1941 (The Politics and strategy of the Second World War).

For the best assessment of Maclean see, Robert Cecil, A Divided Life: A Biography of Donald Maclean, London, Bodley Head, 1989. 6. Donald Maclean, British Foreign Policy Since Suez, London, Hodder and Stoughton, 1970.

Donald Maclean - a detailed biography of Donald Maclean that includes .

Donald Maclean - a detailed biography of Donald Maclean that includes images, quotations and the main facts of his life. Donald Maclean, the son of the Liberal cabinet minister, Donald Maclean, was born in London on 25th May, 1913. He was educated at Gresham's School.

This is a biography of one of the last of the ideological spies, belonging to the important group the author calls "the Cambridge Comintern". Robert Cecil, a close acquaintance of Maclean at Cambridge and in the Diplomatic Service with him at the time of his defection, also knew Philby, Blunt and Burgess. He sees Maclean as Stalin's best source in Washington from 1944-48, where decisions about the post-war world were being made. "A Divided Life" also aims to shed light on Maclean's breakdown in Cairo and the disastrous impact on Anglo-American relations of his defection in 1951. Robert Cecil was created a Companion of St Michael and St George in 1959. He has also written "The myth of the Master Race" and "Hitler's Decision to Invade Russia".
Comments: (6)
HelloBoB:D
I don’t know the reasons behind this reprint of a book that is already been written 24 years ago, but it is still an interesting read. Even nowadays, the words ‘Russian spy’ are guaranteed to peak interest in the news and this story tells you exactly why. Although some parts of the book go a little deep on the philosophical path, and are thus sometimes not so easy to read, the book as a whole is an interesting read.
from earth
Russians! Spies! Today’s headlines? Possibly, but spies for Russia were in the news almost seventy years ago. The Author had a close to connection to the infamous British spy, Don MacLean and in this well-documented and serious piece of research he presents the history of the times leading up to and after World War II.

Don Maclean was raised in England, in an upper class family. His father, Sir Donald Maclean had law firms in London and Cardiff and was a Member of Parliament. He briefly served as the Minister of Education. Don Maclean, the son, went to public school and then Cambridge. While at Cambridge in the 1930’s, he became enamored with the Marxist vision and was subsequently recruited by the Soviet NKVD
(precursor to the KGB.)

The author/historian attended Cambridge a few years after Maclean, but even at that time the author realized Maclean was a communist. “Donald and his friends unquestionably believed that it was only a matter of time before communism was everywhere.” (However, the author dryly notes that Maclean did not feel barred from enjoying the pleasures of capitalism while he waited for the communist paradise.) Maclean is
presented as an ideological spy- spying because he believed in communism and not for money.

After graduating from Cambridge, Maclean qualified for the Foreign Diplomatic Service and began to construct a legitimate career while he pursued his nefarious trade as a spy. Thus, Maclean was able to pass information to the Soviets all during World War II, and even more alarming, after the War ended, Maclean was posted to Washington, D.C. where he had access to the non-technical secrets of the plans for future atom bombs and atomic development.

When Maclean was outed in the early 1950’s he escaped to the Soviet Union, and eventually his wife and children joined him. At the time, British-American relations were strained by this discovery of espionage. And the author feels it was the end of an era- the Foreign Service could no longer depend upon loyalty to the Crown, it had to develop modern security protocols.

This is not a story of cloak and daggers and thrilling spy escapades. Maclean always had a Russian handler, but the point of this book is to flesh out the history of the times. The author gives us a serious presentation of the facts which will appeal to true history lovers, especially British readers who may have more context to understand the times. Recommend.

Thank you to NetGalley and Thistle Publishing for a review copy.
Mikarr
In this illuminating biography of Donald Maclean, author Robert Cecil draws on a close family connection and a path that in many ways followed that of Maclean’s. They went to the same children’s parties because their respective families knew each other well. Cecil followed MacLean to Cambridge, but they weren’t there at the same time. They were later to become colleagues in the Foreign Office/Diplomatic Service. Whilst both were posted to Washington DC immediately after World War Two had ended, both would regularly journey to New York; Cecil to attend the lectures of the Russian mystic and philosopher PD Ouspensky, Maclean to meet his Soviet controller. Indeed, Cecil asked Maclean’s advice on the problem of travelling to NY in the working week. There were no red-eye shuttle flights back then. Maclean’s advice: “make it [the time] up by working on a Saturday afternoon.”

This is a magnificently researched book. Cecil draws on this meticulous research in addition to his own personal knowledge of the man, Maclean, and those closest to him. It is also clear that colleagues of Maclean were prepared to speak openly to Cecil, whom they liked and trusted, when they would have refused other biographers. The result is a book that brings Maclean and the period vividly alive.

The book covers all the relevant periods including Maclean’s recruitment as an agent by the Comintern (Communist Internationale); his early years in Paris; marriage to Melinda; his breakdown in Cairo; and ultimate flight, with Burgess, to the Soviet Union.

Perhaps the most fascinating part of a wholly fascinating book deals with Maclean’s years in Washington from 1944-48, a time when crucial decisions about the post-war world were being made. Maclean was assigned top secret work connected with the development of the atomic bomb–the ‘Manhattan Project’ or ‘Alloy Tubes’ as it was dubbed by the British. He was undoubtedly Stalin’s best source in Washington, and Russian knowledge of US nuclear capabilities fuelled the atomic-weaponry race. Maclean’s treachery did immense damage to Anglo-American relations.

The blurb for this book also mentions another “casualty, which Cecil is well-placed to describe…” “… to the gentlemanly culture of the Foreign Office and the sense of trust within the Service.” The author does describe it well from an insider’s perspective. It made me shudder as to how ineffectively the secrets of the country were guarded. It seemed to be a classic case of ‘the old boys’ network’ at work rather than some benign “gentlemanly culture” as per the book description.

Of course, another casualty was Maclean’s family life. His children were brought up in Soviet Russia. His marriage was in tatters after his wife, Melinda, had joined him in Russia. Despite his treachery, I did have some sympathy for him as he clearly loved his wife and children. It was also clear he was a true idealist. He did not engage in spying for money or the thrills. He did it as a true believer in Marxism. Sadly, his religion-like fervour blinded him to the truth.

I received a free digital copy of this book from the publisher Thistle Publishing. I was under no obligation to review it and all opinions expressed are my own.
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