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eBook The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village epub

by Dongping Han

eBook The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village epub
  • ISBN: 1583671803
  • Author: Dongping Han
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Monthly Review Press (December 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1709 kb
  • FB2 size 1779 kb
  • Formats doc rtf txt lit


The Unknown Cultural Revolution is just that.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution is just that. The author grew up in a Chinese village during the CR and was a beneficiary (there were hundreds of millions of them, as it turns out) and explained why it was such a success. 3 people found this helpful. The prevailing consensus of convenience portrays Mao's GPCR as an economic and political disaster that retarded economic growth and political maturity through excessive egalitarianism and collectivism.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution book. Before the cultural revolution the village leaders often abused their power and they were selected top down without democracy. That changed completely during the CR. "The reason why the leaders worked harder during the Cultural Revolution was simple. Common villagers would not tolerate lazy leaders.

New York: Monthly Reviw Press, 2008

New York: Monthly Reviw Press, 2008. xviii; 192 pp. ISBN-13: Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which assumes that this period of great social upheaval led to economic disaster, the persecution of intellectuals, and senseless violence.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which .

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which assumes that this period of great social upheaval led to economic disaster, the persecution of intellectuals, and senseless violence.

During the Cultural Revolution, the Chinese government empowered Chinese farmers to set up their own .

During the Cultural Revolution, the Chinese government empowered Chinese farmers to set up their own schools. The Chinese elite today tell the Chinese people and the world that the Cultural Revolution was a national disaster, during which education suffered tremendously. The truth of the story is that actually the Cultural Revolution expanded education to the countryside. Dongping Han, who was a farmer and manager of a collective village factory during the Cultural Revolution, is a professor of history at Warren Wilson College and the author of The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village.

Book Event: The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village with author Dongping Ha. At age 19, he was elected manager of a collective village factory during the Cultural Revolution.

Book Event: The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village with author Dongping Han. 1a. MAIN PRESENTATION Dongping Han, author of: The Unknown Cultural Revolution: Life and Change in a Chinese Village. Dongping Han is Professor of History at Warren Wilson College and was farmer. Raymond Lotta introduces.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which assumes that this period of great social upheaval le. Drawing on extensive local interviews and records in rural Jimo County, in Shandong Province, Han shows that the Cultural Revolution helped overthrow local hierarchies, establish participatory democracy and economic planning in the communes, and expand education and public services, especially for the elderly.

Dongping Han grew up during the GPCR and is the author of the book, The Unknown Cultural Revolution-Life .

Dongping Han grew up during the GPCR and is the author of the book, The Unknown Cultural Revolution-Life and Change in a Chinese Village. His story is a very welcome contribution to the struggle to get the real story out about the GPCR. In December 2008, Dongping Han participated in a very significant symposium in New York City, "Rediscovering the Chinese Cultural Revolution: Art and Politics, Lived Experience, Legacies of Liberation," which was sponsored by Revolution Books, Set the Record Straight Project, and Institute for Public Knowledge-New York University.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which assumes that . Dongping Han teaches history and political science at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina. Han comes from a rural background in China.

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China's Cultural Revolution, which assumes that this period of great social upheaval led t. .

The Unknown Cultural Revolution challenges the established narrative of China’s Cultural Revolution, which assumes that this period of great social upheaval led to economic disaster, the persecution of intellectuals, and senseless violence. Dongping Han offers a powerful account of the dramatic improvements in the living conditions, infrastructure, and agricultural practices of China’s rural population that emerged in this period. Drawing on extensive local interviews and records in rural Jimo County, in Shandong Province, Han shows that the Cultural Revolution helped overthrow local hierarchies, establish participatory democracy and economic planning in the communes, and expand education and public services, especially for the elderly. Han lucidly illustrates how these changes fostered dramatic economic development in rural China.

The Unknown Revolution documents a neglected side of China’s Cultural Revolution, demonstrating the potential of mass education and empowerment for radical political and economic transformation. It is a bold and provocative work, which demands the attention not only of students of contemporary Chinese history but of all who are concerned with poverty and inequality in the world today.

Comments: (7)
Niwield
Did you ever imagine you would read a heart-warming account of the Cultural Revolution? The Unknown Cultural Revolution is just that. The author grew up in a Chinese village during the CR and was a beneficiary (there were hundreds of millions of them, as it turns out) and explained why it was such a success.
jorik
Dongpin Han's revisionist (save the irony) look at China's Cultural Revolution is a much-needed review of an era officially demonized in both modern China and the larger world. The prevailing consensus of convenience portrays Mao's GPCR as an economic and political disaster that retarded economic growth and political maturity through excessive egalitarianism and collectivism. The period's pervasive image is one of frenzied juvenile delinquents waving Little Red Books, forcing ordinary citizens to "go on red", destroying cultural monuments, beating up their elders and teachers, and battling each other in mass gang wars. Dongping Han, unlike most observers, grew up in rural China at the time, and was in a position to see a much different side. Westerners might be forgiven their ignorance of "the unknown Cultural Revolution," but not Chinese officials. Dongpin Han challenges not only their elitism, which motivated their discrediting of grass roots development, but the dominant global market dogma that development and social equality are by nature mutually exclusive. This is what makes his study of great relevance to not only modern China but the rest of the developing world.

Dongping Han quantitatively shows how education, political responsibility, and basic industry developed in his home region by bottom-up, grass roots mobilization, which removed corrupt officials, empowered ordinary citizens to speak their minds through "big character posters," brought technical education to country youth, and provided basic social service support. Rather than create a "global village," the Cultural Revolution sought to make a full life accessible to real village people. The author does not excuse the extremes of the period, as some allege. But he encourages us to see beyond the stereotype, and reminds us that discrediting the Cultural Revolution was a political "struggle" in its own right by self-interested parties, seeking to restore and retrench lost privileges by attacking the very idea of social equity and collective action.

I will challenge him on a couple points which stop my hand from giving the book five stars. He writes of a "culture of submission" in rural China which reinforced the class domination of the village. While the author certainly knows rural China better than I do, the idea sounds as fishy as a "culture of poverty," and is belied by the very evidence he presents. The submission of ordinary people is largely role-playing, as we see every day in our own jobs and official interaction. Once freed from imposed constraints we also see these deference patterns are not deeply ingrained at all. Such "culture" is, then, a construct contingent on continued external enforcement, not exactly a repressive psychological force in its own right. Similarly, the popular elan of "one for all" during the GPCR, while genuine, was also enforced by heavy social pressure. Participants who spoke a hard line, volunteering extra work and time, did so - as they later admitted - for status reasons, to deflect criticism, or just bent with the east wind to avoid the harsh punishment inflicted on the deviant.

But this did not detract from genuine development for the poor and neglected majority. The preceding Great Leap Forward, following Soviet-style collectivization, was a disaster that has ever after served Western critics as "proof" of socialist inhumanity. The Chinese Party itself learned its lesson. Reformers like Deng Xiaoping decided they must take the "capitalist road" or China would sink like a stone. Mao himself was too much the revolutionary to think inside the cold war's intellectual boxes. He opted for a third way, which offered (on its own terms) a form of democracy and development for China. Despite the official condemnation of resurgent restorationists, the Maoist era now looks idealistic and even naïve. Certainly the mindless urban speculation, massive unemployment and dislocation, pervasive corruption, and environmental degradation of "Reformed China" are no improvement over howling hordes of Red Guards. It was these same Maoist youth that evolved into modern dissidents; while residues of the period are still evident outside China, in the growth of paramedics or affirmative action programs. Those in the West denouncing China's current lack of democracy, while praising its market reforms and the class that promoted them, demonstrate that round-eyed obtuseness is still the prevailing condition among many China-watchers.
Coidor
This is a book written by someone who lived through the Cultural Revolution in China and gives a viewpoint counter to the one promoted by the U.S. and other Western nations. He writes from the class viewpoint of the vast majority of the people living in China, the poor peasants, and how the Cultural Revolution changed their lives for the better. He writes particularly about the changes in the village he grew up in and how the people in his village were empowered during the Mao Era.
Bludsong
Excellent Book! For anyone who wants a more accurate picture of the realities of the Chinese Cultural Revolution than what has come to be commonly accepted. It takes a big picture view and avoids the narrow pitfalls of the many history-through-memoir books on the subject.
DABY
Highly impressive. I never came close to understanding the motives behind the Cultural Revolution until I read this book. Objective, meticulously researched (I think it began life as a thesis) and above all not as sensationalised as many other histories of this period.
Weernis
THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION IN CHINA HAS BEEN MUCH MALIGNED BUT HIS MAN LIVED THROUGH IT AND SHEDS AN ENTIRELY DIFFERENT LIGHT.
Cordanara
book fills in many blanks as to how and why communism succeeded and failed in this dramatic human social experiment
Those interested in what it is that forges class consciousness (in the midst of our current international war of the rich on the poor, where the rich use their governments as executive committees and armed weapons and the children of the poor go off to kill the poor of other nations on behalf of the rich in their homelands--the rich being fully class conscious and the poor not so much) and what the relationship is of social inequality and education, should pay attention to this first effort from Dongping Han and hope for even more. Granted, this is not William Hinton, but it is a contemporary effort to demonstrate that what the Chinese "Communist" government says about the Cultural Revolution simply does not make good sense, that equality and economic development are not contradictory, nor are education and equality at odds. I hope Han finds a lot of readers who also check out his nice concluding bibliography. The struggle continues....
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