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eBook Diana: The Making of a Terrorist epub

by Thomas Powers

eBook Diana: The Making of a Terrorist epub
  • ISBN: 0395123755
  • Author: Thomas Powers
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Company; First Edition edition (1971)
  • Pages: 225 pages
  • ePUB size: 1717 kb
  • FB2 size 1617 kb
  • Formats lit txt doc docx


Diana Oughton (January 26, 1942–March 6, 1970) was a member of the Students for a Democratic Society . The theme and central character fly in the face of the shop-worn texts concerned with violent criminals and terrorists.

Diana Oughton (January 26, 1942–March 6, 1970) was a member of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) Michigan Chapter and later, a member of the 1960s radical group Weatherman. Oughton received her . from Bryn Mawr College. After graduation, Oughton went to Guatemala with the VISA program to teach the young and older indigenous Indians.

Diana: The Making of a Terrorist Hardcover – 1971. by. Thomas Powers (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. This book should be read by every student of criminology and every parent and teacher who is puzzled by the magnetic spell that the intellectual idea of revolution, violence and intrigue have over otherwise normal, well-educated young people, of great potential. It should be required reading of every student of Criminology, Terrorism, and Criminal Investigation.

Powers is "a great journalistic anthropologist. In possibly the best book ever written about the . Diana: The Making of a Terrorist, Houghton Mifflin, 1971, ISBN 978-0-395-12375-1. A, The Man Who Kept the Secrets, Powers took the reader on a fascinating journey into the world of secret intelligence gathering and covert action. was, at least in the early years of the cold war, a tribe as mysterious and exotic as the Great Plains Sioux of the 1870s  . The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA, Knopf, 1979

In 1971 UPI reporters Lucinda Franks and Thomas Powers won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for their profile on Diana Oughton, a member of the Weather Underground.

In 1971 UPI reporters Lucinda Franks and Thomas Powers won the Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting for their profile on Diana Oughton, a member of the Weather Underground. This is part 1 of the 5 part series as it originally appeared in the Boston Globe. LUCINDA FRANKS and THOMAS POWERS. Her love of family was not the only traditional value that Diana was unable to shed. She never lost her gentleness, either, or her sense of morality; but consumed by revolutionary commitment, she became a terrorist, fully prepared to live as an outlaw and killer. Diana wanted to destroy many things.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Diana: The Making of a Terrorist as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

T Powers book Diana: The Making of a Terrorist revd . Thomas Powers and Lucinda Franks, reporters for United Press International, were assigned last summer to a fivepart series on the short, unhappy life of Diana Oughton.

T Powers book Diana: The Making of a Terrorist revd; traces Doughton's life from 1 of affluence to her death in explosion in Weatherman bomb factory, NY. The book is about as good as it could be, considering the notunexpected lack of cooperation from Diana's radical friends. Her family, however, did cooperate.

Lucinda Franks & Thomas Powers, United Press International, Sep 1970. This Pulitzer-winning series originally appeared in the United Press International and is reprinted on Longform by permission of the authors. Diana was strongly affected by it and joined a project in Philadelphia to tutor black ghetto children. Although tutors were supposed to be limited to one child each, Diana soon had three.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Diaries of a Heartbroken Duchess

This book was required reading back in the early 1970's in High Schools. I remember many a student having this in their possession. The movie from 1975 "Katherine", starring Sissy Spacek is based on this book.

This book was required reading back in the early 1970's in High Schools. The movie was highly rated, about a young woman, from a wealthy family. She becomes involved radically, and leads to her demise, unfortunately. This was the path of many young people in the 1960's and 1970's. The Vietnam war, the bad presidential administrations, protest on campus, avoiding the draft, and so forth, were highly questioned by many

Thomas Moore Powers, American writer. Diana: The Making of a Terrorist.

Thomas Moore Powers, American writer. Recipient Pulitzer prize for national reporting, 1971. "Shortly before noon on Friday, March 6, 1970, an explosion tore through the front wall of a century-old red-brick townhouse on a quiet, tree-lined street in New York City.

children are only new poeple
Comments: (5)
Roru
A well-researched true account of the tragic short life of a beautiful, talented and intelligent young woman from a prominent family who became involved with a young college revolutionary named William "Bill" Ayers. She soon gravitates to becoming one of Ayers' roommates along with Ayers' old roommate, Tim, and his other girl-friend, an equally dedicated terrorist named Bernardine Dohrn/ The book is about the subtle and insidious process of brain-washing and fascination with intrigue and a college crush that leads a woman like Diana, and many others like her to follow an intellectually challenging road to destruction. She drifts, along with Ayers, from a naive experiment in inner city youth education to membership' in the Students for A Democratic Society (SDS), which morphs suddenly into a domestic terror group calling itself "Weather Underground" (WU) both groups orchestrated by a demented elderly communist, propelling her from a striking debutante into a drawn and emaciated terrorist constructing anti-personnel dynamite bombs in the basement of a New York Townhouse. Her death at a young age occurred without warning, as either she or Ayers former roommate, Tim, managed to touch two wires together and detonate the bombs (which they had intended to carry into an annual NCO Ball and Dinner at nearby Fort Dix, to kill and maim as many U.S. soldiers and their families and friends as possible). She and Tim were blown to pieces, their bodies identified only by fingerprints. This book should be read by every student of criminology and every parent and teacher who is puzzled by the magnetic spell that the intellectual idea of revolution, violence and intrigue have over otherwise normal, well-educated young people, of great potential. It should be required reading of every student of Criminology, Terrorism, and Criminal Investigation. The theme and central character fly in the face of the shop-worn texts concerned with violent criminals and terrorists. I had the experience of explaining to the parents of another young woman whose life paralleled that of Diana Oughton in many respects, telling them that their beautiful and promising daughter, who had been awarded a full scholarship to a leading University, that she was wanted for her participation in a Bank Robbery that resulted in the cold-blooded murder of a police officer. They registered total disbelief, thinking it was mistaken identity. When they finally realized it was her, they wept. Diana is the story of a wasted life.
great ant
In search of a book I've never been able to forget, I turned to Amazon to give myself a memory trip. This terrifying and terrifyingly sad story still grips a reader with its 60's snd 70's bio of an upper middle class, Mid-West girl "gone wrong." It's not just a revolt against parental conseervatism and small town boredom—Diana is drawn into the swirling excitement of the youth-orriented political movements of the period and their confrontational crusading qualities. She becomes a "women's leader" politician, the lover of nationally known extremists, and finally a committed member of a terrorist group advocating violence to gain their political goals. She was busy in a NYC townhouse assembling bombs when something went wrong. Diana and others were obliterated along with the townhouse. The non-fiction narrative gives a reasonable explanation of the workings of Diana's mind—she was not crazy but committed, in an era when commitment could mean destruction.
anonymous
Gave me insight into a nice woman who committed to a disturbing group.
Kata
This book is a page turned and a worthwhile read for those of us who are interested in the turbulent times of the late 1960's and the early 1970's. Also worth reading at the same time to compare and contrast is "Fugitive Days" by Bill Ayers. "Diana" is flawed beacuse of the lack of footnotes and documentation and source material used by the author. Also the book does not, in my opinion give sufficient weight as to WHY many young people in America at that time turned to political action and a few to violence. The horrors of the American War on Vietnam did not and does not justify terrorism, there is no doubt about this.
Still, I developed an admiration for all of the GOOD things Diana Oughton did in Guatemala and at a school in Ann Arbor before she "went off the deep end".She was part of a generation who tried to change the world for the better. Historically it reminds me of those folks-yes mainly well to do intellectuals- who went off to Spain to fight fascism, franco and Hitler in the 1930's- 1/2 of whom died.
I also have heard assertions from Mark Rudd and Cathy Bodouin- Boudouin was at 18 w 11st during the explosion- of nasty arguments at the townhouse in the days leading up to the 6 march 1970 expolsion killing Oughton and 2 others, where Oughton argued against directing their violence against people- while the others adamantly disagreed? Could she have deliberately detonated the bomb on purpose while working on it in a bid to slow down or mitigate Weatherman violence-maybe I'm a dreamer as John Lennon said- but I hope so. Richard Morgan Brookahven NY
Kazimi
This book was required reading back in the early 1970's in High Schools. I remember many a student having this in their possession.

The movie from 1975 "Katherine", starring Sissy Spacek is based on this book.

The movie was highly rated, about a young woman, from a wealthy family. She becomes involved radically, and leads to her demise, unfortunately.

This was the path of many young people in the 1960's and 1970's. The Vietnam war, the bad presidential administrations, protest on campus, avoiding the draft, and so forth, were highly questioned by many.

Surprisingly now has become nostalgia.
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