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eBook Academic Freedom after September 11 (Zone Books) epub

by Beshara Doumani

eBook Academic Freedom after September 11 (Zone Books) epub
  • ISBN: 1890951625
  • Author: Beshara Doumani
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Zone Books (March 17, 2006)
  • Pages: 328 pages
  • ePUB size: 1405 kb
  • FB2 size 1581 kb
  • Formats azw txt rtf mobi


Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm.

Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm. Academic freedom is under a sustained assault following the terrorist attacks of September 11. The free flow of information has been restricted, unreasonable barriers to academic materials have been erected, and foreign students and faculty have come under increased surveillance. Such actions are a misguided response to the threat of terrorism. Hamstringing the free exchange of ideas and information will do little if anything to prevent terrorist attacks, but will certainly diminish the capacity of the academic community to address threats to public safety.

Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm, or do they represent a structural shift that undermines one of the pillars of democratic . Published February 24th 2006 by Zone Books (NY) (first published 2006).

Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm, or do they represent a structural shift that undermines one of the pillars of democratic societies? This book brings together some of this nation's leading scholars to analyze the challenges to academic freedom posed by post-9/11 political interventions and the market-driven commercialization of knowledge, exa Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm, or do they represent a structural shift that undermines one of the pillars of democratic societies? .

This is an incomplete list of books about the September 11 attacks. In the first 10 years since the September 11, 2001 attacks, dozens of books were published that focus specifically on the topic or on subtopics such as just the attacks on World Trade Towers in New York City, and more have been published since. A number of publications have released their own rankings of books about 9-11. The Guardian, in September 2011, provided a listing by three panelists of what they felt to be the 20 best.

Distributed for Zone Books. Beshara Doumani is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley

Distributed for Zone Books. Beshara Doumani is Professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley.

Pp. 327. isbn1 890951 61 7. POLINA MACKAY (a1).

Robert Post, The Structure of Academic Freedom, in Academic Freedom after September 11, ed. Beshara Doumani (Brooklyn: Zone Books, 2006), 6. oogle Scholar. 4. Ellen Schrecker, The Age of McCarthyism: A Brief History with Documents, 2nd ed. (New York: Bedford Books, 2002), 37–38. 8. Keyishian v. Board of Regents, 385 . 589 (1967); Thomas L. Tedford and Dale A Herbeck, ed. Freedom of Speech in the United States, 6th ed. (State College, PA: Strata Publishing, 2009), 312–313.

Beshara Doumani is the Joukowsky Family Professor of Modern Middle East History and Director of Middle East Studies at Brown University. He also a public intellectual who writes on the topics of displacement, academic freedom, politics of knowledge production, and the Palestinian condition.

Beshara Doumani '77 is the director of Middle East Studies and the Joukowski Family Distinguished Professor of. .

Beshara Doumani '77 is the director of Middle East Studies and the Joukowski Family Distinguished Professor of Modern Middle East History at Brown University. He received his BA in History at Kenyon College (1977) and PhD in History from Georgetown University. His forthcoming book is entitled: The Righteous Beneficiaries: A Social History of Family Life in Ottoman Syria, 1660-1860. MESA: Middle East Student Association At Kenyon updated their profile picture.

New York: Zone Books, 2006 (Distributed by MIT Press). Chicago: Haymarket Books and London: Pluto Press, 2004. Notes to p. 308. Index to page 319.

Academic Freedom after September 11. Beshara Doumani. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, institutions of higher learning have been subjected to an increasingly sophisticated infrastructure of surveillance, intervention, and control. Are the dark clouds hovering over academic life a passing storm, or do they betoken a structural shift that undermines a key pillar of democratic societies? This book brings together some of the nation’s leading scholars to analyze the new challenges facing the system of higher education in the United States, including the rise of conflicting interpretations of what constitutes academic freedom.

Essays on the challenges to academic freedom posed by post-9/11 political interventions and the growing commercialization of knowledge.

Are the attacks on academic freedom after 9/11 a passing storm, or do they represent a structural shift that undermines one of the pillars of democratic societies? This book brings together some of this nation's leading scholars to analyze the challenges to academic freedom posed by post-9/11 political interventions and the market-driven commercialization of knowledge, examining these issues in light of the major transformations in the system of higher education since the Second World War, including conflicting interpretations of what constitutes academic freedom.

Following an analysis of the historical significance of the post-9/11 threats to academic freedom, three strongly argued and not easily reconcilable essays by Robert Post, Judith Butler, and Philippa Strum discuss what visions of academic freedom can be defended and the best strategies for doing so. Three case studies―Kathleen J. Frydl on the loyalty-oath and free-speech controversies at the University of California, Amy Newhall on the tortured relationship between universities and the government as seen in language acquisition programs, and Joel Beinin on the policing of thought in the academy in relation to the Middle East―deepen our understanding of what is at stake.

In clear and powerful prose, these essays provide a solid platform for informed classroom and public discussions on the philosophical foundations, institutional practices, and political dimensions of academic freedom on the threshold of the twenty-first century.

Comments: (5)
Tisicai
I surft on this book out of mild curiosity. But reviews like the three posted here convince me that the book must be well worth reading. So I'm buying it. Thanks, team! (I apologize for the 5 stars, since I haven't read it yet. But the program wouldn't let me post this comment without a rating. I'll get back to y'all when I'm finisht reading the book.)
Thetahuginn
Jill Malter gives a terrible review to any book that dares to say, even in the most timid way, that the Palestinians might have the teeniest bit of a point. The pattern suggests that this is her automatic reaction to any book that does not agree with her prejudices. So please disregard her reviews; they are biased in the extreme.
Malalanim
While I believe in discrimination, I certainly can't believe what is in this book. It is an unsubstantiated smear campaign to rally the troups in higher ed to claw again for the preservation of academic freedom- a rally which falls flat.
Velan
Molly Myers, in her review of "My Name is Rachel Corrie," describes the ISM as "an organization dedicated to non-violence." This is radical left-wing propaganda: ISM offices have regularly been used to hide terrorists and their weapons, ISM "pacifists" regularly throw rocks at IDF soldiers, and they're perfectly willing to use violence in order to sabotage the wall intended to keep "innocent Palestinians" from murdering Israelis.

So please disregard Molly's reviews; they are biased in the extreme.
Jaberini
Most of the authors of this book say, in effect, that they are accused of being anti-American. By right-wing fanatics! But that in fact, they are merely stating unpopular views, and are in fact simply being honest.

Unfortunately, the truth is that these folks are totally dishonest. And, in some cases, they are unpatriotic as well. On top of that, some of them unequivocally support right-wing Islamic fanaticism. What they frequently appear to want is not academic freedom but the right to engage in academic dishonesty, often in a misguided attempt to hurt a few Jews.

We start with a spectacularly dishonest article by Beshara Doumani. He moans that "pro-Israel lobbying groups" and others are "policing what can be said about Israel on campus and in public discourse." Obviously, anyone who has been on a few major American campuses can see that the anti-Israeli folks have been far more effective at doing just this. He says that Lawrence Summers "effectively equated criticism of Israel's policies with anti-Semitism." That's a lie. He then defends the infamous anti-Israeli professors at Columbia University, who in real life substitute racist propaganda for scholarship in the classroom. And he dismisses criticism of this attack on academic standards as the work of right-wing groups, pro-Israeli groups, and donors. Even if some criticism of all this dishonesty were from such groups, that would not invalidate it! He tells us to speak and act before it is too late. I suggest we all do just that, and speak out against him.

There are a couple of interesting discussions about the extent to which a professor's "extracurricular" work should be protected. My feeling is that it should be. Noam Chomsky is used as an example. I happen to think that Chomsky ought to have a right to tell outright lies as part of his extracurricular activities as long as he does not commit any felonies. Others feel differently about this, and still others feel that even outright academic dishonesty in one's professional work ought to be okay (something I disagree with completely).

By the way, speaking of felonies, we do see a reference that Sami al-Arian was "disciplined for a statement concerning terrorism." But no mention is made of the enormous amount of evidence that al-Arian had long been a terrorist leader. In fact, that evidence finally got al-Arian fired. Are we now supposed to excuse felons, dismissing their crimes under the mantle of academic freedom? I hope not.

Judith Butler repeats the slander that "any criticism of Israel" is called anti-Semitic by quite a few folks. And she complains about criticism of the notorious International Solidarity Movement. If she wants to make a case for something, I think she ought to be far more honest. Kathleen Frydl attacks the idea of withholding funding from universities if their expenditures promote "violence, terrorism, or the destruction of any state." Now, maybe the wording of such an idea needs some work. But I think it is completely proper to try to stop universities from spending taxpayer money on pro-terrorist propaganda.

Amy Newhall is worried about the United States attaching strings to some language programs. But I think she's the problem here. There are programs that the United States government supports to teach, for example, Arabic in universities. The government does so in the hopes that at least a few students in such programs will use their knowledge of the language to work for the government. If the university encourages them not to do so and we wind up without any benefit from those programs, I think there is no reason to continue them: let the universities use their own money to teach Arabic in that case.

Perhaps the most vicious article is by Joel Beinin. Beinin seems to attack everyone who opposes the substitution of dishonest propaganda for scholarly work, calling such opposition the work of people he dubs "the American Likud." He says "this is not the first time right-wing fanatics have waged a campaign of vilification, guilt by association, guilt by ethnic or religious affiliation, and delegitimization of dissenting opinions." And in this regard, he mentions HUAC and Joe McCarthy. But in fact, it is Beinin himself who is doing all this, in the service of right-wing fanatics no less. A special target of Beinin is a particularly praiseworthy organization, Campus Watch. This organization exposes some of the disinformation and incitement we see on campus, but Beinin claims that what it reports is "false and brazenly bigoted." It is neither. Once again, Beinin appears to accuse others of what he himself is guilty of.

This book pretends to be defending academia. In fact, it is defending academic dishonesty. This dishonesty is a threat to ruin the reputations of plenty of academic departments and possibly discredit entire fields of study. I think we should all encourage the academic community to fight against such violations of academic standards.
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