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eBook Hope In The Dark: The Untold History of People Power epub

by Rebecca Solnit

eBook Hope In The Dark: The Untold History of People Power epub
  • ISBN: 1841956600
  • Author: Rebecca Solnit
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Canongate Books Ltd; Main edition (June 16, 2005)
  • Pages: 192 pages
  • ePUB size: 1794 kb
  • FB2 size 1593 kb
  • Formats lrf lit azw mbr


A great book about political hope is Hope in the Dark by Rebecca Solnit .

A great book about political hope is Hope in the Dark by Rebecca Solnit. Read it - and you'll see how the times of greatest hope are the times of greatest turbulence. Astra Taylor, author, The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age. Rebecca Solnit is a national literary treasure: a passionate, close-to-the-ground reporter with the soul and voice of a philosopher-poet. And, unlike so many who write about the great injustices of this world, she is an optimist, whose faith is deeply grounded in a knowledge of history. This is a book to give you not just hope but zest for the battles ahead. Adam Hochschild, author, King Leopold’s Ghost.

Hope in the Dark book.

Solnit's history of activist victories is driven by a theory of hope as a discipline, not a foreign object one does . Although, my first reading of Solnit was pointed towards Feminism this volume, "Hope in the Dark," is historical. It looks backward from the Bush Administration.

Solnit's history of activist victories is driven by a theory of hope as a discipline, not a foreign object one does or does not possess. Hope requires action and practice; action requires a belief that the world can be changed; believing that the world can be changed requires a knowledge and respect of history. It is pertinent to 2017 because Democratic voters are as depleted by the Trump election as the election of Bush, maybe even more.

Rebecca Solnit has written seven acclaimed works of non-fiction, including Motion Studies:Time, Space and Eadweard Muybridge (Bloomsbury) and Wanderlust: A History of Walking (Verso).

Drawing from thinkers of the last century - including Woolf, Ghandi, Borges, Benjamin and Havel. She creates a manifesto for optimism for the twenty-first century and gives us all true reasons to never surrender. Rebecca Solnit has written seven acclaimed works of non-fiction, including Motion Studies:Time, Space and Eadweard Muybridge (Bloomsbury) and Wanderlust: A History of Walking (Verso). An activist, columnist and cultural historian, she has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Lannan Literary Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize.

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Hope in the Dark traces a history of activism and social change over the past five decades – from the fall . Rebecca Solnit has written eighteen acclaimed works of non-fiction, including Wanderlust: A History of Walking and A Field Guide to Getting Lost.

Hope in the Dark traces a history of activism and social change over the past five decades – from the fall of the Berlin Wall, to the worldwide marches against the war in Iraq. Following in the footsteps of the last century’s thinkers – including Woolf, Gandhi, Borges, Benjamin and Havel – Solnit conjures a timeless vision of cause and effect that will light our way through the dark, and lead us to profound and effective political engagement.

Rebecca Solnit has written eighteen acclaimed works of non-fiction, including Wanderlust: A History of Walking and A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Rebecca Solnit has written eighteen acclaimed works of non-fiction, including Wanderlust: A History of Walking and A Field Guide to Getting Lost. An activist, columnist and cultural historian, she has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Lannan Literary Award. She lives in San Francisco.

This is part of what lies at the heart of Rebecca Solnit's philosophy: sometimes the most unlikely-seeming actions can set off positive chain reactions .

This is part of what lies at the heart of Rebecca Solnit's philosophy: sometimes the most unlikely-seeming actions can set off positive chain reactions, even in the darkest times. And the tool to bring about change is: hope. Casting her net across the world, cultural historian Solnit draws a convincing catch of evidence over the past four decades.

Hope in the Dark is a paean to optimism in the uncertainty of the twenty-first century

Hope in the Dark is a paean to optimism in the uncertainty of the twenty-first century. Tracing the footsteps of the last century's thinkers - including Woolf, Gandhi, Borges, Benjamin and Havel - Solnit conjures a timeless vision of cause and effect that will light our way through the dark, and lead us to profound and effective political engagement.

At a time when political, environmental and social gloom can seem overpowering, this remarkable work offers a lucid, affirmative and well-argued case for hope. Tracing a history of activism and social change over the past five decades - including the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Zapatista uprising in Mexico to Seattle in 1999, and the worldwide marches against the war in Iraq - Solnit proposes a vision of cause-and-effect relations that provides new grounds for political engagement. Solnit's book is accessible and essential reading. Drawing from thinkers of the last century - including Woolf, Ghandi, Borges, Benjamin and Havel. She creates a manifesto for optimism for the twenty-first century and gives us all true reasons to never surrender.
Comments: (7)
Kifer
If you have any interest in writing, in the personal essay, in beautiful sentences, in thoughtful observations -- then you can't avoid Rebecca Solnit.
She has created a genre all of her own, something very few writers can even dream of doing. It just isn't possible to write better than she does.
She has made me fall in love with her mind. Her books reach deep into my world, turn things around, and make me see things differently. They make me different. Again, it's the very highest work that writing can ever do. I will always read anything she writes. The "subject" doesn't matter.
She shows, with an almost magical eloquence that also remains natural and easy-flowing (organic), what writing is for, and just how much it can actually do. And she just gets better. She makes the world a better place.
Marilbine
Everyone flirting with despair over the election of
Trump can find new space in which to breathe, to take deep, refreshing breath and start again in the necessary work of hope. There is always too much at stake for those who look for a better world in which to live, for any of us to give in or give up.
Cordalas
Excellent - gives an uncommon perspective on activism as a journey rather than as an attempt to gain utopia. See activism as a failure when we don't reach all of our goals, keeps us from celebrating our successes, even when they are less than our goals, and this leaves us uninspired to continue what has been good work.
Frostdefender
I found this book useful as a way of re-engaging with an activist mindset. Much of what she writes about activism resonated with me, and was a reason I had turned away. So while I don't agree with her on everything, I do appreciate the intellectual entry point into hope for the future.
Very Old Chap
It's easy for political activists to overlook their own victories. Activists are driven by a bold, transformative vision of change. That vision is indispensable and is the fuel of progress, but it can also encourage activists to adopt a narrative whereby organizers defeat evil and their positive vision of the future comes into existence. But the world is far too ambiguous and chaotic for that narrative; viewing change in those terms leads activists to see their work as resulting only in defeat, which causes burnout and cynicism while discouraging new people from joining a movement. Change is never easy to see and progress never moves on a clear linear path.

Solnit outlines a different vision of change, one which is unpredictable, chaotic, improvisational. Total defeats lead to revolutions generations later; technologies produced by militaries become the engine of peace; supposedly lost causes are resumed; a speech to a nearly empty audience sparks a movement. These aren't just idle theories, Solnit provides real-world examples. Solnit interrogates the ambiguities and forgotten histories of movements and finds thousands of victories; some that only changed one person's life, some that overthrew dictators -- but all victories. It's our obligation to find and celebrate these forgotten victories in order to remind ourselves of our collective power to change the world and inoculate ourselves against the despair and cynicism that would lead us to willingly forfeit the collective power that all of human history clearly shows we possess.

Solnit's history of activist victories is driven by a theory of hope as a discipline, not a foreign object one does or does not possess. Hope requires action and practice; action requires a belief that the world can be changed; believing that the world can be changed requires a knowledge and respect of history. The chaotic (ridiculous?) nature of the world makes it impossible to ever know the full impact of our actions; believing that actions driven by love can improve the world requires a leap of faith; all of human history indicates that that faith is the only engine of change and that it actively imposes new realities on the world, even if we can't fully predict or understand what those realities will be. That gaping unknown between action and impact is the 'dark' Solnit refers to; darkness like a womb, not depression. Changing the world requires giving up the idea that we'll understand what that change looks like. Absurd? Well... What did the dark look like to an abolitionist resisting slavery in 1814; a woman demanding equal political rights in 1790; an environmentalist opposing new pipelines in 2017?

In these catastrophic times with the rise of the far-right, the corporate takeover of our government and media, the existential threat of climate change, and growing wealth inequality, despair and cynicism are easy. Every day corporate power aims to demobilize and alienate us further. Hope has never been a more vital and powerful discipline. Hope is a radical choice; a choice necessary to overcome the crises facing our planet. Solnit reminds us that choosing to practice hope isn't delusional or naive, it's a rational (though difficult) choice that has always been integral to progress. Hope is a choice that burdens us with responsibilities, responsibilities that enrich our lives. Hope requires action. Let's act.
Qumen
The introduction is inspiring and is sticking with me months after reading it. While the bulk of this slender book addresses an era several years ago, the act of reading and remembering how past woes have been overcome is in itself an act of hope. Highly recommend to anyone who cares about making change in their community.
White_Nigga
Heard a re-interview of the author on PBS radio during a morning-after of the political scene.
Easy reading the essays one day at a time, and helped my brain readjust so I can better address situations than just bitch bout them. Thanks, Rebecca!
i"m not finished reading this book, but it is the second Solnit book I've read, the first being "Men Explain Things to Me." Although, my first reading of Solnit was pointed towards Feminism this volume, "Hope in the Dark," is historical. It looks backward from the Bush Administration. It is pertinent to 2017 because Democratic voters are as depleted by the Trump election as the election of Bush, maybe even more. She uses some terms that have become obsolete for political readers but they are recognizable and easy to translate. I intend to read all of Solnit's books and catch her on Facebook, as well.
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