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eBook Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War epub

by James Carroll

eBook Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War epub
  • ISBN: 0805077030
  • Author: James Carroll
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Metropolitan Books; First Edition edition (August 3, 2004)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1388 kb
  • FB2 size 1427 kb
  • Formats lrf mobi mbr doc


Publisher's description: With the words this Crusade, this war on terror, George .

Publisher's description: With the words this Crusade, this war on terror, George W. Bush defined the purpose of his presidency. And just as promptly, James Carroll-Boston Globe columnist, son of a general, former antiwar chaplain and activist, and recognized voice of ethical authority-began a week-by-week argument with the administration over its actions.

Crusade, the collection of Carroll's searing columns, offers a comprehensive and tough-minded critique of the war on terror

Crusade, the collection of Carroll's searing columns, offers a comprehensive and tough-minded critique of the war on terror. From Carroll's first rejection of "war" as the proper response to Osama bin Laden, to his prescient verdict of failure in Iraq, to his ed analysis of the faith-based roots of current . policies, this volume displays his rare insight and scope.

James Carroll is a veteran columnist with the Boston Globe. He specializes in foreign affairs with a particular focus on issues relating to war and peace

James Carroll is a veteran columnist with the Boston Globe. He specializes in foreign affairs with a particular focus on issues relating to war and peace. His insightful volume "Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War" takes the reader from the tragedy of 9/11 to the launching of the Iraq War as well as shrewdly monitoring its continuing impact. Carroll realizes immediately that a calamitous result will occur from shifting the focus away from al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden following 9/11 to Iraq and the objective of toppling Saddam Hussein.

Start by marking Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The war in Iraq has been a victory of moral fervor over moral clarity. Start by marking Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin.

Crusade Seeing James Carroll on C-Span 2, Book TV, talking about his newest book, House of War, gave me a. .

Crusade Seeing James Carroll on C-Span 2, Book TV, talking about his newest book, House of War, gave me a clue that I was missing an important American writer.

James Carroll - Crusade. A nation that was trying to promote the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, especially nuclear weapons, would behave precisely as the Bush administration has behaved over the past three years. p. 11). Going into this book I thought I was going to be in for almost 300 pages of Bush criticisms. However, Carroll's words aren't just a critique of Bush. I'd say that less than half of this book is, in fact, such a critique. Instead, it is a call for peace, a call for thought before action, and a call for learning from history. Most of the book consists of reproductions of Carroll's columns that appeared in the Boston Globe.

In "Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War," Author and former Boston Globe columnist James Carroll presents a collection of his columns as a collective critique on the "war on terror" that defined the presidency of George W. Bush. This discussion with the author took place on a 2004 episode of "Conversations On The Coast with Jim Foster" originating in San Francisco, California.

Crusade by James Carroll - book cover, description, publication history.

James Carroll brings to bear-I hope not too late-the moral clarity we so badly need. James Carroll is the bestselling author of the National Book Award-winning memoir An American Requiem; Constantine's Sword, a history of Christian anti-Semitism; and a dozen novels. With the words "this Crusade, this war on terror," George W. And just as promptly, James Carroll-Boston Globe columnist, bestselling author, and respected moral authority-began a week-by-week argument with the administration. He lectures widely on war and peace, and on lim reconciliation. He lives in Boston, Massachusetts.

A devastating indictment of the Bush administration's war policies from the bestselling author and respected moral authority With the words "this Crusade, this war on terror," George W. Bush defined the purpose of his presidency. And just as promptly, James Carroll-Boston Globe columnist, son of a general, former antiwar chaplain and activist, and recognized voice of ethical authority-began a week-by-week argument with the administration over its actions. In powerful, passionate bulletins, Carroll dissected the President's exploitation of the nation's fears, invocations of a Christian mission, and efforts to overturn America's traditional relations-with other nations and its own citizens. Crusade, the collection of Carroll's searing columns, offers a comprehensive and tough-minded critique of the war on terror. From Carroll's first rejection of "war" as the proper response to Osama bin Laden, to his prescient verdict of failure in Iraq, to his never-before-published analysis of the faith-based roots of current U.S. policies, this volume displays his rare insight and scope. Combining clear moral consciousness, an acute sense of history, and a real-world grasp of the unforgiving demands of politics, Crusade is a compelling call for the rescue of America's noblest traditions.A cry from the heart, a record of protest, and a permanently relevant analysis, Carroll's work confronts the Bush era and measures it against what America was meant to be.
Comments: (7)
Adrierdin
This is a wonderful book containing James Carroll's essays published in the Boston Globe from September 11, 2001 through March 18, 2004. Carroll addresses the actions of the Bush administration, with particular emphasis on the ethical and moral shortcomings that have killed thousands of Iraqis and Afghans, mauled thousands more, have killed a thousand American young people and mauled an unknown number. The preemptive wars started by Bush have succeeded only in costing us the friendship of most of our former allies and have multiplied the number of enemies who hate us.
Minha
No comparison with the format of Constantines Sword. Obviously a gathering and resale of newspaper articles on more current topics.
Banal
As always, a deeply personal, and honest appraisal of what we all lived through.
Carroll is an excellent and clear writer.
Visonima
basically he package all of his columns warning again going to war in Iraq...think we all know that was stupid of US...
Kaim
James Carroll is a veteran columnist with the Boston Globe. He specializes in foreign affairs with a particular focus on issues relating to war and peace. His insightful volume "Crusade: Chronicles of an Unjust War" takes the reader from the tragedy of 9/11 to the launching of the Iraq War as well as shrewdly monitoring its continuing impact.

Carroll realizes immediately that a calamitous result will occur from shifting the focus away from al Qaeda and Osama bin Laden following 9/11 to Iraq and the objective of toppling Saddam Hussein. He sees problems occurring from a reaction totally out of concert with international law as well as reason. Carroll, who has studied international religions closely, cites a major error on the part of the Bush Administration as occurring from his statement that its anti-terrorist initiative was part of a great crusade. Carroll notes that the word crusade sends a chill throughout the Muslim world. It stems from the bloody crusades in which so many Muslims were killed by Christians, culminating in slaughter of all of Arab occupants of Jerusalem.

At a time when a major international problem exists in Israel pitting Israelis and Palestinians that is marked by conflicts over settlement construction and occupation as well as suicide bombers, Carroll observes that the emphasis has been shifted away from this trouble spot, along with others such as North Korea and Iran, as American forces occupy Iraq. He notes that this precipitous move plays into the hands of international terrorists by giving Osama bin Laden and others like him a rallying cry. Muslims are warned that by occupying Iraq the Bush Administration is establishing designs on the entire Arab world.

Carroll recognizes that there is a fundamental problem with George W. Bush. "When the president speaks, unscripted, from his own moral center," Carroll writes, "what shows itself is a bottomless void. To address concerns about the savage violence engulfing `postwar' Iraq with a cocksure `Bring `em on!' (as he did last week) is to display an absence of imagination shocking in a man of such authority. It showed a lack of capacity to identify either with enraged Iraqis who must rise to such a taunt, or with young GIs who must now answer for it. Even in relationships to his own soldiers, there is nothing at the core of this man but visceral meanness." He goes on to describe Bush as a "selfless president," which he sees "not a compliment" but "a warning."

One area where Carroll sharply criticizes the Bush Administration is in the misuse of intelligence. Rather than seeking answers by following the facts wherever they may lead and formulating policy based on those hardheaded, realistic conclusions, he sees the Bush Administration as tailoring circumstances to fit its own desires. Under such circumstances policies are motivated by propaganda rather than intelligence assessments. The classic illustration was the rush to war to protect Americans from a perceived attack in which Saddam Hussein would release "weapons of mass destruction" that never existed. A UN inspection team's work was precluded in the rush to war.

As a perceptive student of history, Carroll decries lost diplomatic opportunities that were lost at the conclusion of World War Two. Rather than take the lead in seeking to put an end to the creation of nuclear weapons, the U.S. and Soviet Union instead entered into a protracted Cold War. This brought the world to the precipice of destruction through a nuclear exchange. A balance of terror was substituted for creative diplomacy and an objective of world disarmament.

With the ability of terrorists to make small nuclear weapons that can be carried in a suitcase, and the corresponding capability of unleashing widespread destruction, Carroll sees the futility of the Bush Administration pursuing Star Wars technology. The strategy of the Bush Administration to abrogate international treaties pertaining to arms control and polluting the atmosphere is viewed in the context of the potential disaster that could result for the entire planet from such selfish policies. At a time when well-reasoned diplomacy is essential a lone cowboy "bring `em on" foolhardy policy with potential cataclysmic results has instead been invoked as primitive emotion supplants reason.
WinDImmortaL
For the past few years - ever since Sept. 11th - James Carrol has been devoting his Boston Globe column to issues pertaining to international policy and terrorism. This book is a chronicle of those articles that start just after Sept. 11th.

Carrol most certainly has a left-wing take on the war on terror, the war in Iraq, and the Bush admin.'s conduct in general. I would not though, as a disgruntled reviewr below has, dismiss him as a leftover 'hippie.' He is far from that. His critiques are prescient and his rhetoric effective. While sometimes overly-rhetorical and emotionally charged, Carrol tends to be quite calm and tempered in his critiques.

His main critiques of the wars on terror and Iraq (and as Carrol seldom tires of asking, "I wonder where next?") are that (a) rather that going to war in retalliation for Sept. 11th, it would have been more effective and humane, to treat the event as a breach of international law and pursue al Quaeda and the perpetrators as criminals, rather than combatants. (2) What in the hell did Iraq have to do with terrorism as it relates to al Queada and is this a weapon of mass distraction? (3) As international leaders, we should be setting an example to follow. Instead, we have shown the international community that preemptive attacks are acceptable and, by effect, have sent nations like North Korea clamouring to get nuclear weapons so they can do it too.

There are certainly objections that can be noted to these arguments but all in all, Carrol presents his case well. The only thing I did not like about the book is that being a collection of short essays, it never allowed Carrol to pursue a compelling line of argument for more than three pages at a shot. Other than that, the book is a good one.
monotronik
Readers familiar with James Carroll's BOSTON GLOBE columns and other writing know that he regularly delivers commentaries of the first caliber. He manages to combine a strong sense of religious devotion with thoughtful political insight, two branches of human thought that don't often grow on the same tree. His day-by-day analysis of how the Bush administration was blundering its way into the worst military mistake in American history is highly readable and often remains accurate. That's something that can't be said for many of the other commentators who wrote during the same period when these essays were first published, between 9/11 and 2004.
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