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eBook Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920's epub

by Frederick Lewis Allen

eBook Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920's epub
  • ISBN: 0471189529
  • Author: Frederick Lewis Allen
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: John Wiley & Sons; Revised edition (September 8, 1997)
  • Pages: 300 pages
  • ePUB size: 1762 kb
  • FB2 size 1755 kb
  • Formats txt lit lrf rtf


Thus I thought that Only Yesterday, a semi-famous history of the 1920s, published in 1931 by a mass-market ual of the time, Frederick Lewis Allen, might teach me something new about that decade

Thus I thought that Only Yesterday, a semi-famous history of the 1920s, published in 1931 by a mass-market ual of the time, Frederick Lewis Allen, might teach me something new about that decade. But I found, to my sorrow, that I learned little new, and I was instead again reminded of how early the rot in America’s ruling classes set in. In today’s common imagination, the 1920s are the Roaring Twenties -an economic boom combined with a new focus on the freedom to do as one pleased (even if Prohibition was the law of the land)

Frederick Lewis Allen had a tremendous knack for picking details that would be relevant almost 100 years later. From the price of basic staple, the the daily routine of the average couple, down to how they start their automobile.

Frederick Lewis Allen had a tremendous knack for picking details that would be relevant almost 100 years later. Mr. Allen then recaps the politics of the times, moral attitudes, prohibition, "Yes, We Have No Bananas", corruption, foreign affairs, radio, and culminating in a view of the stock market crash of 1929 that proved many of my pre-conceived notions incorrect.

Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s. New York: Harper and Row. (history).

His specialty was writing about recent and popular history. Allen was born in Boston, Massachusetts. Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s. Allen, Frederick Lewis (1935). The Lords of Creation: The History of America's 1 Percent. (history, biography, economics). Allen, Frederick Lewis (1940). Since Yesterday: The 1930s in America, September 3, 1929 to September 3, 1939.

Электронная книга "Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s", Frederick Lewis Allen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

A style that is verve itself. Originally A style that is verve itself. A perfectly grand piece of historical record and synthetic journalism. Chicago Daily Tribune.

Frederick Lewis Allen (1890–1954) was born in Boston, studied at Groton, and graduated from Harvard in 1912. In addition to The Lords of Creation, Allen was well known for Only Yesterday, Since Yesterday, and The Big Change.

Frederick Lewis Allen, Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the Nineteen Twenties (New York, Harper & Brothers . Now those who had never liked Wilson, who thought that he had stayed out of the war too long, that.

Frederick Lewis Allen, Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the Nineteen Twenties (New York, Harper & Brothers, 1931); reproduced by permission of Oliver E. Allen. Punctuation and spelling modernized for clarity. milk and water ran in his veins instead of blood, that he should never have been forgiven for his treatment.

Originally published in 1931,Only Yesterdayhas an exuberance and proximity to its subject-the Roaring Twenties in all its scandal and glory-that uniquely captures the feel of the era. Год: 2010.

Ages of Discord: A ic Analysis of American History (Peter Turchin). Thoughts on a misleading and mendacious book that has been used to propagandize generations of schoolchildren

Ages of Discord: A ic Analysis of American History (Peter Turchin). Only Yesterday: An Informal History of the 1920s (Frederick Lewis Allen). Thoughts on a misleading and mendacious book that has been used to propagandize generations of schoolchildren. Newest Oldest Longest Shortest Random.

Written in 1931, this new installment in the Wiley Investment Classics series offers a well-written historical and anecdotal account of the volatile stock market of the 1920s. It traces the rise of post World War I prosperity up to the crash of 1929 before a colorful backdrop that includes Al Capone, Prohibition, the first radio, and the rise and fall of the skirt length.
Comments: (7)
Anarahuginn
A wonderfully written book covering the years 1919-1929. It was written in 1930 and published in 1931. It gives a detailed account of the changing social mores, political movements, rich vs. poor elements, race relations and everything that made the 1920's in America such a decade of upheaval.

Allen, the author was a renowned writer for Harpers magazine the the Atlantic Monthly. His nearness to the decade that had just passed gave him incredible insight into the changing society.

He provides plenty of details and background on social morality, the Teapot Dome scandal, labor unrest, Prohibition, high finance and all the popular plays, authors and the new "moving pictures".

It is well written and he is known for "inventing" this style of historical nonfiction writing much as David McCoullough does today. Rather than a history book (as was the norm then), Allen weaves the events of the day into a story that shows cause and effect.

He closes his book, predictably by the time of it publishing in 1930. He had NO IDEA , as he speculated into the future just how deep the Depression would go and the breadth of the apocalypse that would erupt in Europe 5 years later when Hitler took power. He did write a follow up book covering the 1930's.

I highly recommend this book. I got it as a daily deal for $1.99.
Dodo
"Only Yesterday" has a feel of a modern day writer that climbed into a time machine, traveled back to 1919, lived 10 years in New York, then wrote this book while living in 1929. I expected to drudge through some outdated language, and have to look up items and names that were relevant at the time. What I got was an amazing glimpse into an era that I knew surprisingly little about.

Frederick Lewis Allen had a tremendous knack for picking details that would be relevant almost 100 years later. From the price of basic staple, the the daily routine of the average couple, down to how they start their automobile. Mr. Allen then recaps the politics of the times, moral attitudes, prohibition, "Yes, We Have No Bananas", corruption, foreign affairs, radio, and culminating in a view of the stock market crash of 1929 that proved many of my pre-conceived notions incorrect.

While there is a certain dryness in the early discussion of the politics of the time (no pun intended), everything else draws you in. This was a book that I found very difficult to put down, and intend to go back for another reading, while looking up some of the less familiar references as I go.

The bottom line is that much of the story of the 1920s relates very closely to the events of today. Living wage, gender equality, moral attitudes, stock and real estate speculation are all discussed. And by merely changing a couple of dates and shifting a decimal place here or there, could Mr. Allen be discussing the modern world.

I'm eager to begin Since Yesterday: The 1930s in America, September 3, 1929-September 3, 1939, which currently awaits me on my Kindle.
Jothris
Written just after the "Roaring 20s" ended (first published in 1931), _Only Yesterday_ gives a sense of immeadiacy and level of detail to the decade that is uncommon in histories. The flip side of this is that the author makes a number of cultural references (to music and slang in particular) that has since fallen by the wayside.

There is much to recommend here - the depth and detail of the time period is uncommon, given the closeness to the events of the author. While many contemporary writers have a tendency to emphasize what in the moment may loom large (and therefore miss what later historians will recognize as crucial events), Allen does a remarkable job of identifying issues political, economic and cultural that remain a part of the historical view of the period. How much of this is a function of his own intellect and wry obersvations and how much of this is a function of his work influncing those that follow is diffiuclt to say; nonetheless, Allen puts his finger on many- most, even - of the crucial changes that took place in that remarkable time.

For one so close to the events I was also suprised at the objectivity that Allen brought to his analysis. His criticisms of Wilson and the Progressives were well reasoned and clear without polemics. Similarly, his treatment of Harding and his cronyism and corruption is not excused, glossed over or rationalized. What I found most intriguing was his discussion of the cultural changes, especially regarding women and the young. As is so often the case, the "older generation" berates or maligns the fashions, actions and decisions of those younger than themselves. And while Allen does not shy away from discussing the growing differences in mores and attitudes towards sex (and music and drinking and socializing in general), there is no judgement passed, but rahter a detached narrative of both sides of the conflict. Allen concludes with an examination of the causes of the Crash - the end to the "Coolidge Prosperity" as he calls it. Once I again I was suprised by his prescience in identifying what subsequent economic historians would identify as many of the causes of the Depression.

The writing style and voice are a bit dated, as one would expect - but it is not something that I suspect most would be bothered by (or perhaps even notice). Certainly there is much to recommend here for anyone interested in a deeper, more detailed examination of a critical period in American history. A recommended read.
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