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eBook Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy epub

by Daniel Altman

eBook Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy epub
  • ISBN: 031242809X
  • Author: Daniel Altman
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Politics & Government
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Picador; First edition (September 2, 2008)
  • Pages: 304 pages
  • ePUB size: 1384 kb
  • FB2 size 1189 kb
  • Formats lrf azw rtf mbr


Daniel Altman received his P. This is a pretty dry "audio" (I "read" the unabridged audiobook) presentation of 24 hours in the global economy.

Daniel Altman received his P. He is now a columnist for the International Herald Tribune. He splits his time between New York, Hong Kong, and Buenos Aires.

Now you can. Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy isn't another polemic for or against globalization. Daniel Altman takes you on a whirlwind journey through more than a dozen cities, gathering points of view from moguls, ministers, and the men and women on the street. Daniel Altman takes you on a whirlwind journey through more than a dozen cities, gathering points of view from moguls, ministers, and the men and women on the street

Электронная книга "Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy", Daniel Altman.

Электронная книга "Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy", Daniel Altman. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

His latest book, Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, was published in May 2007 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Altman began his career as an academic economist with a doctorate from Harvard University. He is also the author of Neoconomy: George Bush's Revolutionary Gamble With America's Future, which was published by PublicAffairs in 2004. Altman began his career as an academic economist with a doctorate from Daniel Altman is an American-born author, journalist and economist. His first job outside the ivory tower was as the London- based economics correspondent for The Economist.

Автор: Altman Daniel Название: Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy Издательство: Random .

In the span of one day, how does the world do business?In Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, journalist and economist Daniel Altman answers . The first-ever Global Economic Minute comes from New York City

In the span of one day, how does the world do business?In Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, journalist and economist Daniel Altman answers this ques. The first-ever Global Economic Minute comes from New York City. Global Economic Minute - New York, 4/15/08. Praise for Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy.

Altman, Daniel, 1974-. Thai Airways will omit interim dividend as cost of fuel rises" : Do disruptive shocks help the economy in the long term? - - Epilogue. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Daniel Altman takes you on a whirlwind journey through more than a dozen cities, gathering points of view from moguls, ministers, and the men and women on the street

Daniel Altman talked about his book, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He was interviewed on the C-SPAN BookTV Bus while at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books

Daniel Altman talked about his book, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. He was interviewed on the C-SPAN BookTV Bus while at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. Daniel Altman talked about his book Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Closed Captioning Record People Graphical Timeline. All Speakers Daniel Altman Connie Doebele.

Having chosen June 15, 2005, as the focal point for his book, Altman contacted dozens of people from all corners of the world and all levels of the economy, from factory workers and currency traders to CEOs and entrepreneurs, asking them for first-person narratives of their activities on that one day. Starting with their stories and keying his chapters to the headlines of the day, Altman takes on pressing questions in new ways: Can poor countries become rich too quickly? Can corruption ever be a good thing?

In the span of one day, how does the world do business?In Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, journalist and economist Daniel Altman answers this question by visiting more than a dozen cities around the world and tracing the threads of our ever-changing, ever-integrating economic fabric. Readers travel to Syria, where the president wants to launch his country's first stock market; to Brazil, where a corruption scandal is brushed under the rug in the name of economic stability; to East Timor, where a new nation grapples with its impending oil wealth. Altman diagrams all the gears and cogs, showing how they fit together in the vast machinery of the global economy--all in the events of a single day. Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy is a new and accessible way to look at our complex world.

Comments: (7)
Mpapa
This is a pretty dry "audio" (I "read" the unabridged audiobook) presentation of 24 hours in the global economy. The material itself is technically solid, interesting to the economically minded, and has more than enough detail and explanation to allow the reader to see the interaction among all of the various elements of the global economy, as well as get an appreciation for the size and complexity of what happens on one given day (June 15). The downside is that the material isn't particularly engaging. Probably a read (or listen) appropriate to the econophile or business junkie who wants to appreciate the complexities of the global economy. However, if this isn't your bag of beans, the approach here won't really turn you on to the subject.
Bu
Whatever one's views of globalization: whether one is a free-market fundamentalist or an anti-globalization protester, one thing is certain, global trade is here to stay. Globalization is not something that is controlled by governments or large corporations - though they are influential - rather it is driven by technology. Technology allows investors, consumers, workers, managers, etc. to connect and interact with their counterparts all over the globe. As Daniel Altman explains in his new book, this interconnectedness is growing more complex by the day.

To show how this web of interconnectedness is being woven, Altman chooses a random day, June 15 2005, and gives 14 snapshots from around the world. He updates the old cog-in-the-machine metaphor of the laborer with a new globally connected and empowered knowledge worker. Here he follows the footsteps of Thomas Friedman in The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-first Century. On this given day we see how the entire world is on a quest for better connections to buy products and to get information from around the world.

Each chapter begins with a news story or an email about a specific event. He then shows how this particular story relates to the larger global economy. This is the economist zooming in and out from the micro to the macro. This method reminds me of current events day in grade school when we brought newspaper clippings to school for discussion and possibly some insights into the larger picture.

One of the more interesting chapters was Altman's story about Intel's business in Vietman. In this case a Communist government worked to Intel's advantage since they have monopoly of business within the country. Intel's and the government's goals were basically the same: they both wanted computers in the hands of as many people as possible. The larger issues that Alman discusses are the pros and cons of a MNC investment in a country such as Vietman, the role the government should play, and to the extent to which they should let Intel run the business.

Altman goes on to discuss how Beijing takes advantage of foreign MNC's. Beijing allows foreign companies to buy shares in state companies so that those companies can learn international accounting practices before they are listed on foreign exchanges. By outsourcing their business laws and practices, Beijing is actually sidestepping some very sensitve and difficult issues by letting outsiders write the rules. This is a very clever on their part maneuver since no one has to take responsiblity in case there are some failures.

This book does not have the answers to the big questions, it is only a day-in-the life of the global economy. It does do a good job of showing the globalness of the big issues. It also illustrates why it is important for everyone to get well-connected if they are looking for new opportunities or if they simply want to remain relevant.
Mr.Bean
By now, we all know that "The World is Flat", and globalization (whatever that really means), is a fact, like it or not. But do we really understand global connections? In this interesting production of 14 magazine formatted articles - interjected with educational pieces on credit markets and currency, world stock markets, and oil's economic importance - economic writer, Daniel Altman asks the reader to do some thinking about how the global economics work. Altman asks 14 different questions with regard to global economics, and then does some educating on the subject using real time (15 June 2005) situations to argue both sides of the question.

If you are interested in, "Who really controls the world's money supply?" or, "Is immigration a luxury or a necessity?" then you will find this book of interest. Altman does not attempt to connect the dots for you, but the questions and the stories should give you `food for thought' about the development of our global economy. As the book is constructed using an article format, it is an easy read, even if the subjects are a bit on the `heavy' side. If you are a fan of The Economist magazine, this is a book for you.

Dennis DeWilde, author of
"The Performance Connection"
Vut
This is the penultimate insiders view of the world economy as Altman ( a serious business journalist with a PhD.), lets you peek inside the worlds of a dozen decision maker/influencers/ordinary people in many countries, in the same24 hr period. Fascinating and much more insightful than The World is Flat. I can never read the world business news the same way again. It caused me to renew my online The Economist subscription. I appreciated the inside views on currency exchanges, credit and inflation. The story of Haier in China - delightful vignettes. I had forgotten how much Japan lacked competition until pointed out by Altman. The background on why the US will continue to force its dollar lower is worth the book price. The story about the plight of Chinese peasants really pulls at your gut. A must read, it is topical, thought provoking and appropriate for our market planning.
Wrathmaster
A quick enjoyable read that rides the global economic rollercoaster. The book is more of collection of stories and light theory loosely tied together under the rubric of economic globalization. It is heavier than most media pieces but much much lighter than any work on economic theory.

I found it to be a great little book for people who always wondered about global economic theory and trends, but not enough to grind through the real heavy academic tomes on the subject. The book avoids the "politics" of globalization, but I am sure that those who are anti-globalization will fault the book for not being anti-globalization enough.

The author never claims to be writing "the" book on globalization, instead it is a snapshot of one day and it definitely shows how fast paced and never-ending today's global economy really is.
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