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eBook Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru epub

by Inge Bolin

eBook Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru epub
  • ISBN: 029270982X
  • Author: Inge Bolin
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Texas Press (March 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 232 pages
  • ePUB size: 1251 kb
  • FB2 size 1566 kb
  • Formats txt docx lrf rtf


Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase.

Dr. Bolin received the Circle of Courage Award for her contribution to the science and practice of positive youth development. Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase. This is a great sources that easily engages readers.

Start by marking Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child .

Start by marking Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Inge Bolin traces children's lives from birth to adulthood and finds truly amazing strategies of child rearing, as well as impressive ways of living that allow teenagers to enjoy the adolescent stage of their lives while contributing significantly to the welfare of their families and the community.

Inge Bolin traces children's lives from birth to adulthood and finds truly amazing strategies of child rearing, as. .

Inge Bolin traces children's lives from birth to adulthood and finds truly amazing strategies of child rearing, as well as impressive ways of living that allow teenagers to enjoy the adolescent stage of their lives while contributing significantly to the welfare of their families and the community. Throughout her discussion, Bolin demonstrates that traditional practices of respect, whose roots reach back to pre-Columbian times, are what enable the children of the high Andes to mature into dignified, resilient, and caring adults.

Many Indigenous children in Peru develop a sense of responsibility by participating in work often motivated by an internal and . Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru. University of Texas Press. ISBN 978-0-292-71298-0.

Many Indigenous children in Peru develop a sense of responsibility by participating in work often motivated by an internal and external drive to be an active participant in the community. Paradise & De Haan refer to this process as practicing responsibility and reciprocity through role-taking as an observing helper or active performer. Through participation in work, most children in Indigenous American.

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Child Rearing and Cultures: The Universal and the Specific. June 2013 · International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies. Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru, by Inge Bolin. February 2008 · American Ethnologist. Child Rearing and the Treatment of Children in Primitive Cultures. University of Texas Press

Far from the mainstream of society, the pastoral community of Chillihuani in the high Peruvian Andes rears children who are well-adjusted, creative, and curious.

Far from the mainstream of society, the pastoral community of Chillihuani in the high Peruvian Andes rears children who are well-adjusted, creative, and curious. They exhibit superior social and cognitive skills and maintain an attitude of respect for all life as they progress smoothly from childhood to adulthood without a troubled adolescence.

Growing Up in a Culture of Respect: Child Rearing in Highland Peru, University of Texas Press (Austin, TX), 2006. In 1984, during the course of her doctoral studies, Inge Bolin began anthropological work in Peru.

Far from the mainstream of society, the pastoral community of Chillihuani in the high Peruvian Andes rears children who are well-adjusted, creative, and curious. They exhibit superior social and cognitive skills and maintain an attitude of respect for all life as they progress smoothly from childhood to adulthood without a troubled adolescence. What makes such child-rearing success even more remarkable is that "childhood" is not recognized as a distinct phase of life. Instead, children assume adult rights and responsibilities at an early age in order to help the community survive in a rugged natural environment and utter material poverty.

This beautifully written ethnography provides the first full account of child-rearing practices in the high Peruvian Andes. Inge Bolin traces children's lives from birth to adulthood and finds truly amazing strategies of child rearing, as well as impressive ways of living that allow teenagers to enjoy the adolescent stage of their lives while contributing significantly to the welfare of their families and the community. Throughout her discussion, Bolin demonstrates that traditional practices of respect, whose roots reach back to pre-Columbian times, are what enable the children of the high Andes to mature into dignified, resilient, and caring adults.

Comments: (7)
Kearanny
Inge Bolin is an anthropologist who spent over a decade living alongside the inhabitants of Chillihuani, a remote Andean village in Peru, and Growing Up in a Culture of Respect is one of two ethnographies that she published based on her research and experiences. This particular volume explains Bolin’s findings on how the remote highland Peruanos raise and value their children.

Though definitely what I would consider to be an academic text (in fact, it seems to be on the required reading for some college anthropology programs), Growing Up was very readable and totally fascinating. Since I am a working-class North American woman, the lifestyle of the Chillihuani village felt worlds away. The village is very remote and subject to extreme weather, and everything revolves around the herding of llamas and alpacas. Farming can be exhausting work, as well as dangerous, and there is not very much technology accessible to the population.

Despite the humble agricultural lifestyle, however, the Chillihuani children tend to excel at mathematics, competition, and schoolwork. Bolin, who herself served as godmother to several little ones, this is a direct result of the respectful way in which they are raised by their families. Parents and godparents incorporate children into daily life and tasks from day one. As such, they don’t have the distinct period of adolescence that we are accustomed to in the U.S. They are treasured and loved, but never patronized or devalued, and they are also not the receivers of corporal punishment.

What I found really cool was that there don’t seem to be distinct gender roles in Chillihuani. Men and women can both cook, weave, tend to babies, and herd livestock. Children are taught how to do a variety of different tasks to help better their community, and there is no “woman’s work” or “man’s work.” Boys are not valued above girls, and everyone is expected to do their best. I wish there was more of that mindset in the U.S., where I still have to nash my teeth over gender politics and equality.

Of course, not everywhere in Peru is like Chillihuani, but I enjoyed the chance to learn about child-rearing and indigenous culture in the mountain villages. Right now, we have no way of knowing what part of Peru our children will come from, so I’m trying to learn as much as I can about the different subcultures and ideologies in place.
Negal
Highly informative and fascinating book for the sponsor of a child from the High Andes! I was surprised by what I learned here and didn't want to put this book down. I'm crazy about my sponsor child, and this book reinforced my respect for him and his people. Now I believe I understand better how to write to my child and his family. I think I know better how to show my support for them and my appreciation for their lifestyle, beliefs and ways of being. I have been hungry to learn more about the people described here, and now I feel that I have learned. The book left me still wanting to know more, but finally knowing the questions I needed to ask. I'm currently reading "Rituals of Respect" by the same author, and look forward to giving feedback on it when I'm finished.
THOMAS
Course required book, fast delivery, good quality
Kagaramar
I would most likely give this book a better rating but my copy has several pages where the print and photos do are not visible.
On another note having lived in the highlands of Peru even to this day I have learned many things from the Andean people and their values. There are several differences from area to area. I work directly with the Quechua speaking population. There are some dramatic changes going on now due to governmental influences or lack there of. One of them in particular is the movement of children to the city to get a "better education". This has caused some stress on the families as they are separated from their children for periods of time.

I have both books, Rituals of Respect and Growing up in a Culture of Respect.

There remains much to be learned from the Andean people.

I currently live near the area of the Cordillera Blanca of the Andes.
Dalallador
This is a great sources that easily engages readers. While Bolin tends to see the Peruvian herders from a romanticized perspective, and does not always tend to be entirely unbiased as a result, the author allows the reader a unique insight into a truly fascinating culture. There is a lot to learn from this work, and from this culture! I highly recommend reading.
MrRipper
The book was as I expected it to be from the great reviews. I find it interesting that the culture under review has no word in their language for "respect." I like how the researcher and author says that this culture is "permissive" toward their interactions with young people--and that this is not considered a "dis" toward parents. The U.S. could benefit from adopting many of these parenting postures. Thanks Inge Bolin for the years of personal involvement with this culture, and reporting back on how we can help make the years of childhood more respectful toward our youngsters.
Jack
This book gives an in-depth understanding of how children are included in the life of a community, contributing with initiative to their families and community endeavors, cleverly and creatively.
Respect is a big deal.
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