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eBook The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook: The Global Migration of African Cuisine epub

by Diane M. Spivey

eBook The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook: The Global Migration of African Cuisine epub
  • ISBN: 0791443760
  • Author: Diane M. Spivey
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: SUNY Press (September 7, 2000)
  • Pages: 434 pages
  • ePUB size: 1356 kb
  • FB2 size 1451 kb
  • Formats doc mbr mobi lit


I want to recommend Spivey's fine book to everyone with a genuine concern for the history of African civilization . Chapter 3 is on "Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool" or African cuisine found in Mexico and Central America. The "knots" refers to African hair.

I want to recommend Spivey's fine book to everyone with a genuine concern for the history of African civilization in its most testing and intimate field, examined so carefully here, whether on the preparation of food or its cultural values. I know of no other work of comparable value. - Basil Davidson, writer and host of the highly acclaimed documentary television series, Africa.

Spivey, Diane . 1949-. Cultural studies, National & regional cuisine, International And Ethnic Cookery, Cooking, Wine, Cooking, Africa, Regional & Ethnic - African American, Regional & Ethnic - African, Cookery, African, Cooking, African. New York : State University of New York Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on September 29, 2011.

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Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. I consider this a must-read for anyone who enjoys time in the kitchen, culinary professionals, and those interested in anthropology or history. Food brings us together and it’s lovely to know (much) more than I did about the unspoken and hidden influence of African cuisine.

Migration of African Cuisine - Free ebook download as PDF File . df), Text File . xt) or read book online for free.

The Peppers, Cracklings, And Knots of Wool Cookbook the Global Migration of African Cuisine - Free ebook download as PDF File . p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index.

This powerful book traces and documents the continent's agricultural and mineral prosperity and the strong role . Библиографические данные.

This powerful book traces and documents the continent's agricultural and mineral prosperity and the strong role played by ancient explorers, merchants, and travelers from Africa's east and west coasts in making lasting culinary and cultural marks on the United States, the Caribbean, Peru, Brazil, Mexico, India, and Southeast Asia. Издание: иллюстрированное.

Biscuiteers Book of Iced Gifts by Biscuiteers -Olive Trees and Honey -The Gastroparesis Healing Diet: A Guided Program for Promoting Gastric Relief, Reducing Symptoms and Feeling Great by Tammy Chang -The Saffron Tales.

Biscuiteers Book of Iced Gifts by Biscuiteers -Olive Trees and Honey -The Gastroparesis Healing Diet: A Guided Program for Promoting Gastric Relief, Reducing Symptoms and Feeling Great by Tammy Chang -The Saffron Tales: Recipes from the Persian Kitchen by Yasmin Khan -Mug Crumbles: Ready in 3 Minutes in the Microwave by Christelle Huet-Gomez. Посмотреть все изображения.

Chapter 3 is on "Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool" or African cuisine found in Mexico and Central America. While the author discusses African influences, as well as an Almec-Africa connection, her recipes include: Masar Spicy Roasted Turkey; Yam and Plantain Fruit Pudding; Balimaya Pek Corn Dumpling Stew; and Hunabqu Omon Corn and Masa Soup. Chapter 4 presents the story of Africa in Peru and the highlands, titled "Zancu, Sweet Potatoes and Beer

Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook, The: The Global Migration of African Cuisine электрондық кітабы, Diane M. Spivey. Бұл кітапты компьютерде, Android және iOS құрылғыларында Google Play Books қолданбасы арқылы оқуыңызға болады.

Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook, The: The Global Migration of African Cuisine электрондық кітабы, Diane M. Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook, The: The Global Migration of African Cuisine атты кітапты офлайн режимінде оқу үшін жүктеп алыңыз, мәтінді бөлектеңіз, бетбелгі қойыңыз және белгілеңіз.

Request Eat Your Books to Index this book. Your request will be added to the indexing chart. Save online recipes in one place. Chat with other cookbook lovers. Request EYB to Index. I would like to Index this book myself.

A groundbreaking treatment of heritage survival in African and African American cooking.
Comments: (7)
RUsich155
Very good recipes, very influential in Southern U.S Cookery. But, being written in the 90's it contains a lot of pseudo-history (history unsupported by science, archaeology, and most main-stream noted historians). Ms. Spivey would have us believe that no culture or race on earth could cook decent food until African Influence. That includes the Native Americans, South Americans, Asians, Europeans, etc. The impression I got was she thinks everyone else in the world ate charred half cooked wild game and roots until the African traders came along. She believes corn/maize was in use in Africa before the "discovery" of America just because one group of tribesmen in Africa said that it was there for many hundreds of years. Most grains come from a grass ancestor and could have resembled it, but the hard proof is not there. Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against Ms. Spivey but like a lot of persons with "something to prove" she relies on some 'proofs' that aren't.
Kiutondyl
As a fan of ethnography and food folkways, I found this book interesting. The first thing that jumped out at me was the author's note of thanks to Embassies of Laos, Peru, and India... Intriguing? African cuisine migrated to India? To Laos? The second thing that jumped out at me was the first recipe, which called for "egusi seeds." No worries - there is nearly 100 pages of glossary, sources of ingredients, and bibliography. The third thing that you notice is the author's penchant for railing against those Eurocentric writers who discredited African foodstuffs and cuisine, and denied the Africanism of Egypt and the Olmecs. Even if you never prepare a single recipe, this book serves as a source of African culinary and social history. Nearly every recipe is followed by a bit of history and the story of African migratory influences. Chapter 1 focuses on "Eastern Ethiopians" and Dravidians (the Southern Indians including speakers of Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam, and Kannada) -- participants in the lucrative spice trade for centuries. Highlights for me included "Mississippi Masala Rice"; "Sesame Yam Patties"; "Doro Wat", a chicken in pepper sauce; and "Lamb and Beef Dar Es Salaam" with 7 spices and 3 meats. Chapter 2 is on the Sons and Daughters of Kambu, or those Ethiopian-Indians who migrated and influenced Southeast Asian, Khmer,and Cambodian societies. While highlighting the similarities in certain rituals in Southeast Asia and Africa, the recipes include: Spicy Fish in Peanut Sauce, Afro-Khmer Shrimp and Spicy Rice, Black-Eyed Spring Rolls, and Khmer Sweet Black Eyed Peas (like Hoppin' John, it reminded me of the film "Catfish in Black Bean Sauce"). Chapter 3 is on "Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool" or African cuisine found in Mexico and Central America. The "knots" refers to African hair. While the author discusses African influences, as well as an Almec-Africa connection, her recipes include: Masar Spicy Roasted Turkey; Yam and Plantain Fruit Pudding; Balimaya Pek Corn Dumpling Stew; and Hunabqu Omon Corn and Masa Soup. Chapter 4 presents the story of Africa in Peru and the highlands, titled "Zancu, Sweet Potatoes and Beer." Recipes include: Garden Patties with Onion and Cassava Cream Gravy; Zancu; and Yugeno (a cocktail known as the Peruvian blowdart). Chapter 5, titled, "Body and Soul" The Miscengenation of Cuisine and Culture in Brazil and Cuba," focuses on Brazil and Cuba, while Chapter 6 focuses on America, Haiti, Maroon settlements, and other Caribbean islands. The author, fond of cakes since childhood, include several cake recipes including a Chocolate Coconut cake and a Coconut Cake. "Brazen Tomatoes" will catch your attention. I enjoyed the final two chapters the most. Chapter 7 is a study of the migration of the African American cooks from the American South to the North of the country, and Chapter 8 is titled "Flapjacks and Blue Notes." Recipes include those for dinner rolls; smothered steak; Dr. Carver's peach leather; Booker T's fried chicken; lamb chops in thyme and mushrooms; and a very large variety of flapjacks.
Reemiel
In American colonial and antebellum literature there are many references to the black slaves' "natural genius" for cooking. At the same time, cookbook writers and other gastronomic experts state that Africans had no culinary traditions or cuisine of their own; they learned it all from contact with Europeans. There is a contradiction here. It is this book's goal to document African cuisine and especially to demonstrate the unacknowledged and unappreciated African influence on culinary traditions outside of Africa.
Of course, "The Peppers, Cracklings, and Knots of Wool Cookbook" has chapters on African influences in the cuisine of the Southern U.S., the Caribbean, and Brazil. It should be obvious that the food traditions that came to the Americas with enslaved Africans had a significant effect. (Should be obvious, though is still unacknowledged and unappreciated.)
What is surprising and a bit controversial is Spivey's hypothesis of African influences in ancient times in the Americas and Asia. Spivey takes it as a given that Africans sailed to and traded with the Americas in ancient and medieval times. The real extent of this contact (if any) and its effects on cuisine may be lost to history. At this time, most scholars are unconvinced -- however, this could change with time. The question remains: When there are similarities in the cuisine Mesoamerican people and West African people, is it may be due to specific historical contact between the two? or it could also be a case of two separate cultures making the best possible food in similar environments with similar gastronomic possibilities? Spivey clearly prefers the former and ignores the later. There is the need for more research here; this book is just getting the ball rolling. (The possibility of Old World peoples visiting the Americas before Columbus is well presented in "The Diffusionists Have Landed" in "The Atlantic Monthly" magazine; January 2000.)
Spivey's book is also part cookbook, and the recipes are excellent. It should be mentioned that these recipes are more based-on-tradition than actually traditional. In some cases it seems that Spivey invents recipes based on the theory of historical contact between African and non-African cultures. For example, "Chocolate Lamb and Beef Sauce" which combines the African peanut-stew and the Mexican molé sauce traditions. Does Spivey believe that ancient Africans made this after their voyages to America? Is there any historical text that mentions such a dish? Or did this recipe come into being with her book? Either way, it sounds delicious.
Ynneig
Until this cookbook, I had no idea of the true influence or Africa on world cuisine. Each recipe is preceeded by interesting information on the history of the incredients used that are from Africa. The recipes range from every day cooking to special occasion cooking. I have tried many of these recipes over the years and EVERY ONE OF THEM IS DELICIOIUS! I had to hunt for ingredients in some of the more exotic recipes but that in itself was an adventure. I love being able to show off my knowledge of the ingredients when I cook one of these dished for "company". Get this book! I am ordering a second copy.
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