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eBook Face Value: The Entwined Histories of Money and Race in America epub

by Michael O'Malley

eBook Face Value: The Entwined Histories of Money and Race in America epub
  • ISBN: 0226629376
  • Author: Michael O'Malley
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Social Sciences
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press (June 11, 2012)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1263 kb
  • FB2 size 1611 kb
  • Formats txt mbr mobi docx


Michael O’Malley’s witty, insightful Face Value traces the American quest for a stable source of value in a society that prized freedom.

Michael O’Malley’s witty, insightful Face Value traces the American quest for a stable source of value in a society that prized freedom. Through deft analysis of a wide range of sources, O'Malley shows that arguments over money and arguments over race have had much in common, and indeed, have often intersected in the United States in surprising and disturbing. ways-even now. Most important is O’Malley’s contention that the monetary chaos of the nineteenth century, which has bewildered so many students of American history, turned whiteness into a crucial sign of individual worth.

Like race, money is bound up in questions of identity and worth, each a kind of shorthand for the different values of two similar things. O’Malley illuminates how these two socially constructed hierarchies are deeply rooted in American anxieties about authenticity and difference

Like race, money is bound up in questions of identity and worth, each a kind of shorthand for the different values of two similar things. O’Malley illuminates how these two socially constructed hierarchies are deeply rooted in American anxieties about authenticity and difference

That is the new book from Michael O’Malley, a colleague of mine in the history department.

That is the new book from Michael O’Malley, a colleague of mine in the history department. The heroic individualism many libertarians imagine requires a self freed from all social constraints, but at the same time founded in nature - in natural rights and natural talents.

Michael O'Malley, associate professor of history, has published Face Value: The Entwined Histories of Money and Race in America. Like race, money is bound up in questions of identity and worth, each a kind of shorthand for the different values of two similar things

Like race, money is bound up in questions of identity and worth, each a kind of shorthand for the different values of two similar things. In this compelling work of cultural history, O’Malley interprets a stunning array of historical sources to evaluate the comingling of ideas about monetary value and social distinctions. More than just a history, Face Value offers us a new way of thinking about the present culture of coded racism, gold fetishism, and economic uncertainty. O’Malley illuminates how these two socially constructed hierarchies are deeply rooted in American anxieties about authenticity and difference

Face Value is a book lively on every page-the number of pages, therefore, is regrettably short.

Home Browse Academic journals History Journals The Journal of Southern History Article details, "Face Value: The Entwined Histories of Money an. .Academic journal article The Journal of Southern History. Face Value: The Entwined Histories of Money and Race in America. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2012. Face Value is a book lively on every page-the number of pages, therefore, is regrettably short. All the same, plodding historians may find the argument more flash than bang.

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From colonial history to the present, Americans have passionately, even violently, debated the nature and the character of money. They have painted it and sung songs about it, organized political parties around it, and imprinted it with the name of God—all the while wondering: is money a symbol of the value of human work and creativity, or a symbol of some natural, intrinsic value?

In Face Value, Michael O’Malley provides a deep history and a penetrating analysis of American thinking about money and the ways that this ambivalence unexpectedly intertwines with race. Like race, money is bound up in questions of identity and worth, each a kind of shorthand for the different values of two similar things. O’Malley illuminates how these two socially constructed hierarchies are deeply rooted in American anxieties about authenticity and difference.

In this compelling work of cultural history, O’Malley interprets a stunning array of historical sources to evaluate the comingling of ideas about monetary value and social distinctions. More than just a history, Face Value offers us a new way of thinking about the present culture of coded racism, gold fetishism, and economic uncertainty.

Comments: (4)
Zonama
Michael O'Malley has left no stone unturned when it comes to deciphering the relationship between money and the human experience in the United States. Meticulously researched, O'Malley brings clarity to the burgeoning confusion of what constitutes legal tender in the "Land of the Free." He does this in a entertainly historical progression by taking the country from its roots when virtually anything could represent payment, be it foreign currency, municipal money, or business scrip, to the present day. He covers the failures of the First and Second National Bank before the formation of the Federal Reserve system, the cyclical infatuation with gold, and the constant political struggles between the factions that either decry or embrace the concepts of inflation, consumerism, and the free market. He hews closely to his treatise that there is an inevitable connection between those that believe in "natural" wealth and the masses that should never be allowed access to it. Many instances are cited where the elite are horrified by the possibility that others (the poor, immigrants, slaves, etc.) could ever be allowed to be their equal when their definition of legitimacy is solely represented by a gentleman's holdings. The issuance of paper money is this cabal's biggest fear because just about anyone, through hard work or entrepreneurship, could get their hands on some of what should rightly be theirs. He also explores the continual cycle of booms and busts that reverberate throughout the country's history. His engaging style includes many anecdotes that would surely spice up any reader's future conversations. For example, the seeds of discontent that sparked the Civil War are sown here in the most basic terms. As usual, ideology is always subverted by attention to finance. Much time is spent on the citizen's constant need to demarcate and consolidate the perceptions of who or what should be considered superior. Invariably, the determination is based on assets. One of the amusing interludes details FDR's brilliant bit of Kabuki theater when he removed the country from the gold standard for domestic dealings in 1934. To silence the alarm, and distract the public fear, Roosevelt entranced the masses by building the vault at Fort Knox before publicizing the convoluted security measures-including multiple decoy trains-that would be required to transport the nation's gold to its new home. A must for US history buffs, this book shows us how we got here and how little the conversation has changed.
Golden Lama
Trade paperback received in excellent condition. Receipt received with shipment (much appreciated).
Not-the-Same
Michael O'Malley's work always takes on the Big Picture, and this book is no exception. I enjoyed his last book on Time, and usually check into his well written blog as well. His new book makes several complex relationships a lot easier to understand. It's not a dumbed down pop sort of thing though, you'll find yourself stopping to digest his large ideas every few pages (at least I did...). This book will give you new insights into several problems vexing the fading Empire that is the USA.
Winail
Clearly written and insightful.
I found myself pausing quite a bit to ponder many of the larger ideas that O'Malley laid out.
The book is now being passed around to friends.
Well done.
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