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eBook Sex, Sickness, and Slavery: Illness in the Antebellum South epub

by Marli F. Weiner,Mayzie Hough

eBook Sex, Sickness, and Slavery: Illness in the Antebellum South epub
  • ISBN: 0252036999
  • Author: Marli F. Weiner,Mayzie Hough
  • Genre: Social Sciences
  • Subcategory: Sociology
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1st edition (June 21, 2012)
  • Pages: 328 pages
  • ePUB size: 1657 kb
  • FB2 size 1591 kb
  • Formats lrf txt lrf lit


Sex, Sickness, and Slavery argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled .

Sex, Sickness, and Slavery argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled them to formulate medical justification for the imbalanced racial hierarchies of the period. Focusing on Southern states from Virginia to Alabama, Weiner examines medical and lay perspectives on the body through a range of sources, including medical journals, notes, diaries, daybooks, and letters.

Sex, Sickness, and Slavery argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled .

Sex, Sickness, and Slavery book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Sex, Sickness, and Slavery: Illness in the Antebellum South as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Sex, Sickness, and Slavery: Illness in the Antebellum South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Marli F. Wiener skillfully integrates the history of medicine with social and intellectual history in this study of how race and sex complicated medical treatment in the antebellum South. Sex, Sickness, and Slavery argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled them to formulate medical justification for the imbalanced racial hierarchies of the period. Antebellum physicians recognized that the connections between minds and bodies that were raced, sexed, and placed influenced how they could practice medicine in the South. Minds as well as bodies could make people sick; physicians with a professional interest in restoring them to health knew that their success depended on treating both. Sex, Sickness, and Slavery" argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled them to formulate medical justification for the imbalanced racial hierarchies of the period.

This is a tale of two revolutions. It is a story of history and adventure, science and invention, sex and absurdity, slavery and lunacy, murder and alchemy. A chronicle that sweeps continents and centuries, upending kings and cosmologies, religious dogma and the dark age of faith. -Southern Illinois University, Dept. Weiner's posthumously published book, Sex, Sickness, and Slavery, is an intellectual history of medical science in the pre-Civil War South. In this beautifully written book, Weiner details how physicians wrote and thought about the illnesses of slaves and women

Marli F. In this beautifully written book, Weiner details how physicians wrote and thought about the illnesses of slaves and women.

Sex, Sickness, and Slavery. This study of medical treatment in the antebellum South argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled them to formulate medical justification for the imbalanced racial hierarchies of the period. Challenged with both helping to preserve the slave system (by acknowledging and preserving clear distinctions of race and sex) and enhancing their own authority (with correct medical diagnoses and effective treatment), doctors sought to understand bodies that did not necessarily fit into neat dichotomies or agree.

Marli F. Wiener skillfully integrates the history of medicine with social and intellectual history in this study of how race and sex complicated medical treatment in the antebellum South. Sex, Sickness, and Slavery argues that Southern physicians' scientific training and practice uniquely entitled them to formulate medical justification for the imbalanced racial hierarchies of the period. Challenged with both helping to preserve the slave system (by acknowledging and preserving clear distinctions of race and sex) and enhancing their own authority (with correct medical diagnoses and effective treatment), doctors sought to understand bodies that did not necessarily fit into neat dichotomies or agree with suggested treatments.  Focusing on Southern states from Virginia to Alabama, Weiner examines medical and lay perspectives on the body through a range of sources, including medical journals, notes, diaries, daybooks, and letters. These personal and revealing sources show how physicians, medical students, and patients--both free whites and slaves--felt about vulnerability to disease and mental illnesses, how bodily differences between races and sexes were explained, and how emotions, common sense, working conditions, and climate were understood to have an effect on the body. Physicians' authority did not go uncontested, however. Weiner also describes the ways in which laypeople, both black and white, resisted medical authority, clearly refusing to cede explanatory power to doctors without measuring medical views against their own bodily experiences or personal beliefs. Expertly drawing the dynamic tensions during this period in which Southern culture and the demands of slavery often trumped science, Weiner explores how doctors struggled with contradictions as medicine became a key arena for debate over the meanings of male and female, sick and well, black and white, North and South.
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