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eBook You Stink!: Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players epub

by Michael Aubrecht,Eric J. Wittenburg,Dave Raymond

eBook You Stink!: Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players epub
  • ISBN: 1606351389
  • Author: Michael Aubrecht,Eric J. Wittenburg,Dave Raymond
  • Genre: Sports
  • Subcategory: Baseball
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Kent State University Press / Black Squirrel Books (April 29, 2012)
  • Pages: 332 pages
  • ePUB size: 1637 kb
  • FB2 size 1828 kb
  • Formats mobi docx doc azw


A satiric look at the jeer-ful side of our national pastime. A timeline of Major League terribleness and an assortment of quotations about losing complement this unique survey of shame. Ultimately, You Stink! celebrates a sport that gives us more than just wins and losses and drives to the heart of what all of us love about baseball. Fans bond with their teams, and everyone can relate to suffering through slumps. Watching our heroes stumble through ineptitude, boneheaded plays, and heartbreaking losses makes the celebration all the sweeter when victory finally comes.

Read "You Stink! Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players" by Eric J. Wittenburg .

Start by marking You Stink!: Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams .

Start by marking You Stink!: Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams & Pathetic Players as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. This book takes a lighthearted look at some of the historically bad teams and players that were sprinkled throughout the history of major league baseball.

Remembering baseball's worst teams, players, and moments (that some. 68 batting average with 522 plate appearance is You Stink! worthy in the truest sense of the term. This makes Mario Mendoza seem like Ty Cobb. Congratulations on a truly epic season, Chris Davis!

You Stink! : Major Leage Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players.

You Stink! : Major Leage Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players. by Eric J. Wittenberg and Michael Aubrecht. Unfortunately, winning represents only one side of the game. For every champion's record-setting season, there has been an equally memorable story of defeat. These teams and their shameful contributions to America's national pastime have been a neglected topic in the annals of baseball history

Remembering baseball's worst teams, players, and moments (that some. Congratulations on a truly epic season, Chris Davis!

We discussed our book You Stink! and highlighted the worst teams and players including several seasons and members of our .

We discussed our book You Stink! and highlighted the worst teams and players including several seasons and members of our host’s beloved NY Mets. You can listen to the episode here. For every champion’s record-setting season, there has been an equally memorable story of defeat. These teams and their shameful contributions to America’s national pastime have been a neglected topic in the annals of baseball history

Main Author: Aubrecht, Michael. Wittenburg, Eric . Raymond, Dave. Subjects: Baseball teams United States History. Baseball players United States History. Baseball United States History.

Main Author: Aubrecht, Michael. Other Authors: Wittenburg, Eric .

Wittenberg, Eric . J. David Petruzzi, and Michael F. Nugent

Wittenberg, Eric . Nugent. One Continuous Fight: The Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 4–14, 1863. New York: Savas Beatie, 2008. ISBN 978-1-932714-43-2. Wittenberg, Eric J. '"We Ride a Whirlwind": Sherman and Johnston at Bennett Place', Burlington, NC: Fox Run Publishing, 2017 Template:ISBN 978-1945602023. Wittenberg is the co-author with Michael Aubrecht of YOU STINK! Major League Baseball's Terrible Teams and Pathetic Players. Kent, OH: Black Squirrel Books, 2012.

Terrible Teams & Pathetic Players By Eric J. Taxonomy upgrade extras: SABR Bookshelf book covers. Cronkite School at ASU 555 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: (602) 496-1460. SABR is housed at the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University.

A satiric look at the jeer-ful side of our national pastime

There are countless volumes celebrating the best teams in professional baseball. Unfortunately, winning represents only one side of the game. For every champion’s record-setting season, there has been an equally memorable story of defeat. These teams and their shameful contributions to America’s national pastime have been a neglected topic in the annals of baseball history. Until now.

In You Stink!, two fanatical historians (or historian fans), Michael Aubrecht and Eric Wittenberg, give credit where it is far overdue with a statistically backed, satirical look at the worst teams and individuals ever to set foot on a diamond. You Stink! includes franchise origins, detailed stats, player profiles, photos, and more, as well as a collection of long-format essays in a “Hall of Shame” that recognizes some of the worst moments ever witnessed on a ball field. The first half of the book is based entirely on statistical data; in the second half the authors give their personal opinions.

With an insightful foreword by Dave Raymond, the original “Phillie Phanatic,” You Stink! showcases disappointments on the diamond dating as far back as 1889. Readers are treated to stories of the worst teams, players, owners, calls, fans, plays, and more. A timeline of Major League terribleness and an assortment of quotations about losing complement this unique survey of shame.

Ultimately, You Stink! celebrates a sport that gives us more than just wins and losses and drives to the heart of what all of us love about baseball. Fans bond with their teams, and everyone can relate to suffering through slumps. Watching our heroes stumble through ineptitude, boneheaded plays, and heartbreaking losses makes the celebration all the sweeter when victory finally comes.

Visit the You Stink! blog for more pathetic terribleness.

Comments: (7)
Xisyaco
This romp through the sorriest plays and players of baseball history contains more than a few smiles and one or two laugh-out-loud moments. But the style is a little wooden and repetitive in places, undercutting the essential comic nature of baseball folly... all that effort exercised with such grim seriousness, turning in an instant into a Keystone Kops mess. It's a stat-lover's dream... but if you're like me and care less for the season-long stats and more for the snappy anecdotes, there's still plenty of delight to be found here.
GAZANIK
I was disappointed in this book because it was more of a listing of teams that were bad without any real depth to the discussion of why they were bad. Several teams, like the St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, or Pittsburgh Pirates were not given the full discussion they warrant in a book of this type.
Thetahuginn
I did enjoy this book, since rarely are the infamous moments in baseball written about (outside the dozen or so well-known ones). I did learn about several things I had never heard of, like the X-5 ball. However, especially in the section on the worst teams, there were many, many factual errors. Luckily for myself, I caught most of them and just moved on, but I felt it important to write this review to say that people should be careful before taking anything in this book as fact.
Zulurr
I like the book, but the material has been done better, most notably in On a Clear Day They Could See Seventh Place by George Robinson. I did like the stories about Bill Bergen and some of the terrible players from the past.
I am hcv men
....Nothing new here if you are a student of Baseball. Dull & Boring as the writer "mocks" out players/teams who did not "perform" adequately between the lines. It's easy to criticize a player while sitting in the stands! Hey, Mr. Author, why don't you go out onto the field of play & see how well *you* do! Hmmmm......
Goldenfang
Many of us like to read and hear about the greats of sports - and the media is quite happy to accomodate us fans. But just as interesting, if not more so, are the boneheads, incompetents, and boobs that made up some of the worst teams to ever have the audacity to contaminate the diamond. There have been a few small works in the past that highlighted some of these knuckleads of baseball history, but along comes Eric Wittenberg's and Michael Aubrecht's aptly titled encylopedic tome, "You Stink!" And the players (and some coaches) and the teams herein were indeed the most olfactory-insulting individuals of the game. Before reading this book I knew of a few of them, but the book opened me up to the crowned princes of doofuses - such as the 1942 and 1961 Phillies (the '42 team badly diluted by WWII enlistments), the 1962 Mets (worst baseball record of the modern era), and the 1969 Seattle Pilots (aptly described as "a joke" by one player of the team). And there's a lot more in here. The books includes not only detailed descriptions (you'll feel the pain along the way with the players, owners and then-fans) of the putrid teams and seasons, tables and tables of stats, and dozens of photographs.
A bonus is the Foreword written by none other than Dave Raymond, the original "Phillie Phanatic" mascot. As Dave succintly writes, "Ultimately what you get with You Stink! is the celebration of a sport that gives us more than wins and losses." And that's exactly what the book does - while it gives us a wonderful treatise of the worst the American pastime has yet had to offer, it celebrates the sport in a way no other book has yet done... by presenting the good and the bad in the personalities that keep us glued to the TV or anxious to get into the stadium seat.
So whether you are a sports fan or not, a baseball afficianado or you've never watched a game in your life, grab up this book and sit back and enjoy. This book is, in the end, more than just a celebration of baseball and the worst nitwits to ever grace a field - it is a celebration of American life.
Qag
Imagine if sportswriters from the past 150 years were magically able to gather together and swap stories about the worst baseball teams they ever saw. That conversation, if I had to guess, would resemble the content of Wittenberg and Aubrecht's new book "You Stink!". This supposition crossed my mind within a few pages, and the more I read, the more I became convinced of it. Maybe that is not precisely what the authors intended, but at least for me, that is what came across.

It would be easy enough for a causal fan to peruse one or more of the many websites offering baseball statistics and say "oh, its obvious why the 1916 Athletics or the 2003 Tigers stunk." Wittenberg and Aubrecht provide some of those statistics, but numbers themselves are not really the focus of the book. The authors go beyond the numbers to show the circumstances of why these awful teams took the field as they did. Sometimes the stories are well known, but many times they are not. Telling the "why" is the strength of the book.

It is worth noting what the book is not. If you are looking for an in-depth, sabermetric analysis of specific players and teams, you will not find that in "You Stink!". In the main, the book relies on batting averages, home runs, RBI and ERA. Currently fashionable statistics like OPS, WAR and WHIP do not appear. I don't consider this to be a drawback: not every baseball book needs to offer that type of discussion, and many hardcore baseball fans I know roll their eyes when I argue that player so and so's high batting average standing alone doesn't show he is a particularly effective hitter. Further, given the records posted by these teams speak for themselves, I would posit that, although using advanced metrics might be somewhat helpful to put some of the statistics in context, their use here would be largely unnecessary and could even detract from the stories of these terrible teams.

There are some errors in the text (for example, Mickey Mantle hit 54 homers in 1961, not 56 as stated). You might scream to yourself when you catch one, but in the end, they do not detract from the narrative or diminish the excellent storytelling the book offers. Also, the errors are easily fixable, and I would be surprised if these little mistakes aren't cleaned up when the book goes into a second printing.

In sum, "You Stink!" is storytelling at its finest. If you have even a passing interest in sports history, you'll be entertained. And if you are a baseball fan, you'll surely enjoy it. To the authors: well done, gentlemen.
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