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eBook The Scorecard Always Lies: A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA Tour epub

by Chris Lewis

eBook The Scorecard Always Lies: A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA Tour epub
  • ISBN: 1416538046
  • Author: Chris Lewis
  • Genre: Sports
  • Subcategory: Biographies
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press; Reprint edition (July 13, 2010)
  • Pages: 352 pages
  • ePUB size: 1887 kb
  • FB2 size 1939 kb
  • Formats lit docx lrf azw


The Scorecard Always Lies book.

The Scorecard Always Lies book. While embracing all the drama and excitement of the 2006 PGA Tour season, he takes us inside the locker rooms, hotel rooms, and private planes to deliver an unrivaled, behind-thescenes look at the Tour and the men who play it. Lewis spent thirty weeks of the 2006 season on the road with the best golfers in the world, exploring their backstories, motivations, and preoccupations, and collecting telling, character-revealing tales. He bore witness to both the hard work and the privilege that frame their lifestyles.

The Scorecard Always Lies: A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA Tour. But he also discovered a Tour that to this point remained largely unknown - one where a player while pursuing dreams of glory might also be suing his agent, going through a messy divorce, or looking to throw down in the locker room with one of his peers.

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Scorecard Author Dug It Out of the Dirt. com User, January 17, 2009. I normally yawn after a chapter or two of these "behind the scenes on the PGA Tour" books, throwing them on the pile for re-gifting

Scorecard Author Dug It Out of the Dirt. I normally yawn after a chapter or two of these "behind the scenes on the PGA Tour" books, throwing them on the pile for re-gifting. That's not a critique of John Feinstein (A Good Walk Spoiled) or his imitators - it's just an acknowledgment that my own work as a golf writer robs these books of the ability to surprise me. "I know this," I say, flipping through the pages. I was there for that.

Home Lewis, Chris THE SCORECARD ALWAYS LIES A Year Behind . List this Seller's Books.

Home Lewis, Chris THE SCORECARD ALWAYS LIES A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA. 50,000 first printing.

Bennett and Plummer wrote, with Peter Morrice, the book The Stack and . Lewis, Chris, "The Scorecard Always Lies: A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA Tour". ISBN 978-1416537168).

Bennett and Plummer wrote, with Peter Morrice, the book The Stack and Tilt Swing. ISBN 978-1-592-40447-6). The Bennett and Plummer model gained publicity beyond the PGA Tour players and instructors environment once a major golf magazine covered it in June 2007 References. Bennett, XIX. ^ Lewis, 179. ^ Bennett, pp. 95–116: Chapter 5, "Stack & Tilt versus the conventional swing". Morrice, Peter (June 2007). The New Tour Swing: The Swing Whisperers".

They took in some Tour de France highlights and saw aftermath footage of the previous day's bombings in Lebanon that included jarring pictures of injured children. Compared to that," Woods remarked to Williams, "the golf seems pretty unimportant

They took in some Tour de France highlights and saw aftermath footage of the previous day's bombings in Lebanon that included jarring pictures of injured children. Compared to that," Woods remarked to Williams, "the golf seems pretty unimportant. They knew the practice might not be condoned by the men who originally wrote the Rules of Golf. But after so many mornings just like this one-whiling away.

The Scorecard Always Lies. A Year Behind the Scenes on the PGA Tour. Published May 15, 2007 by Free Press. There's no description for this book yet.

As Tiger Woods broke down in tears on the 18th green at Royal Liverpool Golf Club, legions of spectators strained their eyes to read the emotion on his face. Like the millions watching on television, they knew that Tiger had just won the British Open, and that his father had recently died. Beyond that, however, they knew precious little - only that he played with a Nike golf ball, carried an American Express card in his wallet, and, presumably, drove a Buick. They were hungry for more, but everything else about his off-course life, and those of his fellow pros, was forbiddingly well-guarded. Until now. In The Scorecard Always Lies veteran Sports Illustrated golf correspondent Chris Lewis reaches past the results, stats, and sound-bites to focus on the personalities and personal lives of the sport's top players. While embracing all the drama and excitement of the 2006 PGA Tour season, he takes us inside the locker rooms, hotel rooms, and private planes to deliver an unrivaled, behind-thescenes look at the Tour and the men who play it. Lewis spent thirty weeks of the 2006 season on the road with the best golfers in the world, exploring their backstories, motivations, and preoccupations, and collecting telling, character-revealing tales. He bore witness to both the hard work and the privilege that frame their lifestyles. But he also discovered a Tour that to this point remained largely unknown - one where a player while pursuing dreams of glory might also be suing his agent, going through a messy divorce, or looking to throw down in the locker room with one of his peers. There's John Daly trying to explain how his wife has just been taken off to jail. There's Chris Couch making a midnight, barefoot run through a derelict district of New Orleans, fearing he was about to be kidnapped, and taking refuge in a tattoo parlor. We watch as Tiger Woods tries to deal with losing his father to cancer, while refusing to abandon
Comments: (7)
Nakora
I've been what most would call a very passionate golf fan the past 12 years. Despite an entire channel dedicated to the game, I found myself still very surprised how little I knew about the golfers involved. It's different than other sports I like - football, baseball, etc. The game is individually-based, with a traveling sideshow that should elicit great stories... or at least more stories than what squeaks out.

When I say this delivers the dirt, it's not "scandalous" or meant to ruin anyone's image. Rather, the amount of detail about conversations, connections, and events are absolutely incredible. Most golf books count "detail" as telling you about every shot a golfer hit (snooze...) on a hole or round. There is a tiny bit of that, but this focuses more on the stories behind it - I've read just about every book recommended on being inside the various Tours, and none come close.

To show you, I'm going to go pick a page at random out of the book - about tour players traveling out of Scottsdale. I count 8 things on that page I didn't know, and I'm a voracious reader/infojunkie. Let's pick another one - about the Nelson Classic. 6 on this page and one is very juicy.

I read a few comments about the book before purchasing, and most were about ticky-tack inaccuracies. Hey, I saw some proofreading errors in there, and maybe the author mixed up left and right hand. Consider golf is a game which is probably over-obsessed with rules (I love the rules, but even the announcers & players gripe about some) to the point where we have fans call in penalties on the phone. I love golf, but I could do without that part of the fan base.

If you're looking for inside stories to help personalize all these guys out there on the tour, then this is absolutely the book you want to get. 300+ pages dense w/ stories - ones so "from the horse's mouth" in private conversations, you wonder how he got all these guys to agree to add it all in.

What is it we hear about the Tour - these guys mostly come off as robots. Sure, guys like Tiger, Phil, or more colorful characters like Boo Weekly will get their day in the sun and a weighty bio, but most of the other guys - even high-profile ones, are relegated to the shadows. This book evens the score - it shines some light around back in there. Even if it is 7 years old at the time of my review, most of those guys are still in the game and was a very welcome read on a rainy weekend.
Rrd
as a rabid golf fan, i enjoyed the book. but i have to say it is the most poorly edited book i have ever read. in addition to well over 50 spelling and grammatical errors, i counted numerous factual errors. examples, in addition to the ones pointed out by other reviewers:

pg 105 - author says the players in 2007 moved from april to may - it was moved from march to may

pg 168 & 214 - he states goosen's 2005 us open final round score as 81 on one page and 80 on the other

pg 160 - mentions 2000 us open at southern hills, that was '01, '00 open was at pebble

pg 179 - mentions tigers famous 6 iron at canadian open. calls it a shot out of thick rough - it was out of a fairway bunker

does simon and schuster not have fact checkers? its embarassing, thats, what, seven factual errors?....in response to another review the author states he had to fact check quickly to get the book out...thats BS and no excuse, i read it in a day and could have cleaned it up for him in that time. its not 'obvious' as he says, every author i've ever read manages to not to get facts wrong every 30 pages.

in short, only the fact that i love the PGA tour makes this readable. c.l. needs to step up his game to challenge john feinstein....he's playing dicky pride to feinstein's tiger woods right now.
Roru
Usually I like books of this genre but this one is awful.

There is the usual genuflecting to Tiger, some offhand snide remarks at Phil Mickelson, but otherwise a very dull book. You read about the players and could not care the least about them.

No mention at all about how the charities get very little money from all this. If you talk to some people from the PGA, they will try to convince you that their tour is more charitable than the United Way.

A few reviewers noted that the author identified some of the Democrats on the tour. Heck, some of the players have political viewpoints far to the right of Barry Goldwater.

Just a bad half-baked book.
Lanadrta
I cannot believe they would let this kind of stuff be published. I am amazed that someone who writes about professional golf for a living could make so many factual errors. This was a waste of money and it's rare I say that about a book. I feel mislead by the description.

This book is of the same ilk as Feinstein's Tales from Q School, but without a consistent human element. You don't follow a group of players through the season. It's basically just highlights from each Tour stop.

The only value I found in this book was that it described the period right after Feinstein's 'Tales'. Interesting to hear about some of the Q School graduates' fates.
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