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eBook Holy Disorders: Gervase Fen #2 epub

by Edmund Crispin

eBook Holy Disorders: Gervase Fen #2 epub
  • ISBN: 1933397284
  • Author: Edmund Crispin
  • Genre: Suspense
  • Subcategory: Mystery
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Felony & Mayhem (February 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1795 kb
  • FB2 size 1481 kb
  • Formats rtf doc mbr txt


Edmund Crispin, the pseudonym of Robert Bruce Montgomery, first began to write mystery stories featuring Gervase Fen because of a bet. The rumor is that Gervase Fen is based on Oxford professor, .

Edmund Crispin, the pseudonym of Robert Bruce Montgomery, first began to write mystery stories featuring Gervase Fen because of a bet. Moore and this book, like Crispin's others, is full of references to English literature, poetry, and music. Set in the World War II era, there is a murder of a cathedral organist and Oxford don, Gervase Fen, is eccentric, sarcastic, absent-minded, childish and vain-as well as utterly delightful

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. The Long Divorce: Gervase Fen, Edmund Crispin.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free.

The man didn't have an enemy in the world, and even his music was inoffensive: could he have fallen foul of a nest of German spies or of the local coven of witches, ominously rumored to have been practicing since the 17th century? show more.

Fen appears in nine novels and two books of short stories published between 1944 and 1979. Fen is an unconventional detective who is often faced with a locked room mystery to solve. Fen is described as lanky, cheerful and ruddy with a clean shaven face and hair which is always plastered down with water, but with stray hairs spiking from his crown.

Gervase and Geoffrey go to a cathedral town in this book to investigate an attack on the church organist. This is just the beginning of all sorts of creative violence.

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Crime fiction at its quirkiest and best

Free books to read or listen online in a convenient form, a large collection, the best authors and series. Crime fiction at its quirkiest and best. The man didn't have an enemy in the world, and even his music was inoffensive: could he have fallen foul of a nest of German spies or of the local coven of witches, ominously rumored to have been practicing since the 17th century?

For long stay gervase fen. Accompanying this had been a reply-paid form allowing for a reply of fifty words

For long stay gervase fen. Accompanying this had been a reply-paid form allowing for a reply of fifty words. It was with a sense of some satisfaction that Geoffrey had filled it in: COMING VINTNER – a satisfaction, however, tempered by the suspicion that Fen would not even notice the sarcasm.

In the sleepy English village of Sanford Angelorum, professor and amateur detective Gervase Fen is taking a break from his books to run for Parliament.

The man didn't have an enemy in the world, and even his music was inoffensive: could he have fallen foul of a nest of German spies or of the local coven of witches, ominously rumored to have been practicing since the 17th century?

Eccentric Oxford professor Gervase Fen remains as maddeningly childish as ever, still deliciously fond of his own wit and erudition. He's equally fond of amateur sleuthing, so the murder of the cathedral organist is a cause for glee. Could the fellow have fallen afoul of a nest of German spies or of the local coven of witches, ominously rumored to have been practicing since the 17th century? Tracking down the answer pleases Fen immensely?only the reader will have a better time.
Comments: (7)
Anarus
Gervase Fen is a rather annoying sleuth — arrogant, often rude, irascible and given to erratic and irrational behavior. Somehow he keeps the admiration and loyalty of his friend Geoffrey Vinter, a composer of church music. Fen is an Oxford don, and his eccentricities make for entertaining reading.

The dialog bristles with allusions to literary lights, including Shakespeare, Poe, de Rochefoucauld and Louis Carroll. Fen is also given to quoting the Scriptures. This is cultured crime writing with a vengeance. I find it fun, even when it goes over my head.

Gervase and Geoffrey go to a cathedral town in this book to investigate an attack on the church organist. This is just the beginning of all sorts of creative violence. For a cerebral mystery, Holy Disorders is replete with action. There’s even espionage and witchcraft in the mix. Holy Disorders was first published in 1945, and Nazi spies were a hot topic. As for witchcraft, the town of Tolnbridge was big on burning witches in past centuries, and witches still appear to be flitting about.

Most of the characters are flush with peculiarities — the shop clerk who claims to be an earl and keeps saving Geoffrey’s life, the psychoanalyst who is losing his faith in the subconscious, the canons who constantly quibble over doctrine, and so forth. Geoffrey, a confirmed bachelor, falls in love. And Gervase collects and studies insects when he should be sleuthing.

This is a tremendously witty and clever mystery, with every miscellaneous detail turning out to be critical to the plot. I loved every batty minute of it.
one life
I have always been of two minds about Crispin. On one side of the ledger, he's a gifted writer, at times genuinely brilliant. He does humor very well -- the first part of this, which details the trip of the protagonist to the town where all the action occurs -- is quite funny, in many respects a bravura performance, in fact. (Although it doesn't really link up well to the action of the story, see below.) Surprisingly, Crispin is also rather good at action writing: the climax of this revolves around three action set pieces, all of which were completely believable and suspenseful. Humor writing and persuasive action writing is not an easy thing, and I applaud Crispin's skills in this area.

On the other side, though, I'm not sure Crispin really writes very good detective novels. He's good at setups -- in this book, for instance, there's intimations of witchcraft and the occult -- but the follow through is often pedestrian and tired. Strip away the accoutrements, for instance, and this soon resolves itself into a timetable mystery, of all things, with the central point question being that of accounting for everyone's movements down to the minute/second. Which isn't bad, exactly, but does seem a little tired beside the verbal fireworks. It's hard to build narrative excitement around timetables. (Compare with Agatha Christie's complicated game playing and self-aware sense of what the rules for a mystery story are, for instance, or John Dickson Carr's brilliant reveals and his hearkening back to the gothic roots of mystery fiction .) As much as I like the stylistic virtuosity in these books, typically when I finish one the ultimate feeling is much ado about little -- a lot of pyrotechnics deployed to try to buttress what is, in fact, fairly weak tea. "Unsatisfied", maybe...I feel generally "unsatisfied" by it all. The humor and the action work very well, but they seem very disassociated from the rest of the story -- you could lift these sections out and the actual plot of the book would remain fundamentally unchanged.

To Crispin's credit he seems aware of this himself, here he has a secondary character say pretty much the same thing about a detective writer. And I'm not saying there's not pleasures to be found here -- Crispin, again, was a talented writer. The book certainly has it's moments. But he'll never be a favorite of mine, one gets the feeling with Crispin of a talented writer who ultimately probably should've been writing something different: straight comedic fiction ala Kingsley Amis or (better) some kind of comedic thriller, maybe, where the storylines could be of necessity simpler and there'd be less temptation to get tangled up in the weeds.
Pettalo
It's a comparison I've made before, but reading Edmund Crispin is like crossing Agatha Christie with P G Wodehouse in the best way. The mystery - and it's solving - are sort of by-the-way; really the author is having fun with situations and characters, and throwing out apt quotations that the audience is expected to catch, and enjoy.
I will say the chapter 'Two Canons' where they meet a possible suspect who owns a pet raven made me guffaw in the street...at the end of the interview, Fen recommends to him the poetry of Edgar Allen Poe...
A bit smart-arse, but really very amusing!
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