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eBook The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. 2) epub

by Robert Wilson

eBook The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. 2) epub
  • ISBN: 0156011190
  • Author: Robert Wilson
  • Genre: Suspense
  • Subcategory: Mystery
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Mariner (November 3, 2003)
  • Pages: 312 pages
  • ePUB size: 1487 kb
  • FB2 size 1413 kb
  • Formats mobi txt lrf lit


Edgy and brutal, Wilson's The Big Killing is a wild ride through the lawless territory of West Africa, where greed rules and bodies lie trampled in its wake like so much fertilizer. If possible, the Dark Continent has become even darker, as portrayed by Wilson, while the lush natural bounty and untapped resources are attacked by raptors with the power to plunder and destroy with impunity.

The Big Killing" is my first Robert Wilson book. West Africa is no paradise, and Wilson shows us this. It's corrupt and violent, with miles of distance between the haves and the have-nots. It is the second in his series of mysteries featuring Bruce Medway, British expatriate living in the Ivory Coast. Since it was in the bargain book section, I went ahead and picked up the third and fourth books. Despite the fact that it has been decades since the region has been under direct European Imperial rule, one of the central issues, Wilson reminds us, is that the Europeans never left.

The Big Killing book. Robert Wilson hit the big time with novels set in Spain and Portugal; this is one of the . Unless he can get to the bottom of the mystery, Medway knows that for the savage killer out there in the African night, he is the next target. novels set in West Africa which he wrote back in the nineties. You couldn't really pick a better locale for the jaded, world-weary sensibility of the classic private eye yarn.

AUTHOR CONFIDENTIAL No. 2 in the Bruce Medway series.

SYNOPSIS Bruce Medway, freelance fixer and negotiator, is stuck in the Ivory Coast waiting on his master's pleasure, drinking too much and having dangerous ideas, with no Heike or Bagado to save him. When Fat Paul, a porn merchant, persuades him to make an unusual delivery of a video and a friend from the old country asks him to chaperone a young diamond dealer, Bruce sees cash, expenses and possibilities writ large. AUTHOR CONFIDENTIAL No.

The Big Killing The Bruce Medway Mysteries.

As a fixer, Bruce Medway makes his living doing things other people don’t want to do. And in the seedier corners of West Africa, there are plenty of tasks that need doing. For example, porn producer Fat Paul needs someone to deliver a video to the Ivory Coast, but the recipients will only trust a white man to make a drop. A Syrian millionaire wants Bruce to travel to Korhogo to fire someone on his payroll. The Big Killing The Bruce Medway Mysteries.

The big killing/Robert Wilson. 1st Harvest ed. p. c. (A Harvest book). I'm Fat Paul, who are you?' 'Bruce Medway. The white man no wan' come to Abidjan, he no wanbe seen there, he have his own problems, I donno wh. 'Why don't you just go to Korhogo and cut out the middlemen?'

The big killing/Robert Wilson. What they got here that's any good, Bruce?' 'Pineapple fritters. 'Why don't you just go to Korhogo and cut out the middlemen?' 'We'-he pointed to himself who could easily pass for plural-'we no wango Korhogo, too much far, too much long.

Robert Wilson (born 1957) is a British crime writer currently resident in Portugal. He is the son of an RAF fighter pilot, and has a degree in English from Oxford. Wilson is the author of the Bruce Medway series, set in and around Benin, West Africa, and the Javier Falcón series, set largely in Seville, Spain. He is also the author of the espionage novel The Company of Strangers and A Small Death In Lisbon, which consists of a historically split narrative, and won the CWA Gold Dagger in 1999

Items related to The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. 2. In this second novel of the Bruce Medway series, our hero, a go-between and "fixer" for traders in steamy West Africa, smells trouble when a porn merchant asks him to deliver a video at a secret location.

Items related to The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. 2). Wilson, Robert The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. ISBN 13: 9780156011198. The Big Killing (Bruce Medway Mysteries, No. Wilson, Robert. Things look up, though, when he's hired to act as minder to Ron Collins, a spoiled playboy looking for diamonds in the Ivory Coast.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

An evocative and atmospheric thriller set along the part of the African coast they used to call the White Man’s Grave, The Big Killing is the second novel to feature Bruce Medway Bruce Medway, go-between and fixer for traders in steamy West Africa, smells trouble when he’s approached by a porn merchant to deliver a video to a secret location. Unless Medway can get to the bottom of the mystery, he knows that for the savage killer out there in the African night, he is the next targe. hriller & Crime. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. However, I'm not so sure if that was a bit of a hasty decision in the end.

In this second novel of the Bruce Medway series, our hero, a go-between and "fixer" for traders in steamy West Africa, smells trouble when a porn merchant asks him to deliver a video at a secret location. Things look up, though, when he's hired to act as minder to Ron Collins, a spoiled playboy looking for diamonds in the Ivory Coast. Medway thinks this could be the answer to his cashflow crisis. But when the video delivery leads to a shootout and the discovery of a mutilated body, he wants out. Obligations keep Medway fixed in the Ivory Coast and he is soon caught up in a terrifying cycle of violence. Unless he can get to the bottom of the mystery, Medway knows that for the savage killer out there in the African night, he is the next target.
Comments: (7)
Xisyaco
Wilson seems happier with his West African locales than he does with Spain, where his novels get bogged down in scenery and slow paced character development. This novel moves with punch and direction, steering the reader through unusual locations, a post-colonial world of ruthless energy, sinking back into tribalism. well worth reading although it helps to start with the first novel and work up to this one.
Thetath
Robert Wilson nails Central West Africa dead on target . The plot does not disappoint , and the characters radiate personalities with a host of human flaws and frailties that are avoided by many authors today. A great read.
Braned
The big killing is a book full of killing. Full of spectacular killings, somewhat too much in my opinion. It is very well written. You Get a feeling of beeing in Western Africa. You can smell all the smells from rubbish and feel all the warm nights. You read about the heavy rain as if you sit in the car together with Bruce. I like the book and will read the other books from Africa as well.
Reighbyra
I have preferred some of his othere books but still found this to be enjoyable. interesting to read about africa in a novel setting. gave some new insights into the situation there.
Dancing Lion
Robert Wilson brings a contemporary West Africa alive in this fast-moving and bloody thriller. From cell phones to witch doctors, he depicts how the modern world pours over peoples struggling out of bush poverty. A string of horrific murders puts protagonist Medway in suspicion from the police, but he is released and runs into even worse savagery when he visits Liberian territory during the brutal civil war. The action is quick, the characters intriguing and the conversation witty. However, like Perez-Reverte in "The Club Dumas" and "The Flanders Panel", Wilson is actually telling two stories on parallel tracks, which meet only in that Bruce Medway is involved in both. There is really no connection between the two sets of murders, and I suspect that Wilson decided to combine several plots to make up one reasonably sized novel. Also, considering how many plot strands are carefully wound up by the end, it is surprising that several of the most interesting characters never reappear: the African police inspector and the Belgian diamond merchant. Perhaps they will show up in a sequel.
Togor
"The Big Killing" is my first Robert Wilson book. It is the second in his series of mysteries featuring Bruce Medway, British expatriate living in the Ivory Coast. Since it was in the bargain book section, I went ahead and picked up the third and fourth books. However, I'm not so sure if that was a bit of a hasty decision in the end.

When we first meet Medway, he's a bit of a mess. Evidently, the events of the first book, "Instruments of Darkness" (which I have not read) have left him a disillusioned (although I doubt that he was ever "illusioned"), adrift in the Ivory Coast, broke, pining for his lost love, and waiting for his Syrian millionaire patron to give him something to do. In the meantime, the Liberian Civil War is raging, with one of its apparent casualties begin the Liberian VP, found with his innards ripped out by a killer simply dubbed "The Leopard".

Naturally, as is the case in such novels, Medway finds he has three jobs all at once. His Syrian millionaire friend wants him to check on the manager of his sheanut plantation. An old friend from England asks Medway to chaperone a young diamond merchant. And a repugnant pornographer asks Medway to deliver a package. These diverse plot-threads soon converge in a political tangle, as Medway maneuvers his way through the thoroughly corrupt world of West Africa.

The plot is quite brisk, if convoluted. Medway stumbles into ambushes, tangles with corrupt village police, dodges a massive kidnapping plot, all while the bodies pile up around him. Numerous characters enter the stage, although only a few actually seem to have any bearing on the overall novel. Wilson is very good at playing with the reader's perceptions and stereotypes, as some characters who seem as if they're going to be critical to the overall plot wind-up dead within a few pages of their introduction. Other characters who seem as if they are merely in the novel to provide background color actually prove extraordinarily relevant. This talent for misdirection serves Wilson well, as he keeps the reader enticed by the enigma of his novel as we try to figure what's going on with Medway.

It's fortunate that this novel is so plot-driven, because Medway is not a terribly strong character. While drawn from the writings of old school hard-boiled fiction, Medway feels as if he's lacking something. He never quite appears to be the moral White Knight Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe is. Nor is ever the self-righteous tough guy who is willing to bloody his hands for justice like Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer. While he seems an okay guy, Medway seems to simply be going through the motions, playing tough-guy detective, tangling with cops, killers, and dames. While that's part of Wilson's intent early on, he never really gives Medway anything to strive for, beyond simple survival. Medway never really seems to care about the various people dying around him, but he seeks justice for them nonetheless. His code is perhaps too fuzzy to understand, and that might have been Wilson's goal, but Wilson did the character no favors by not letting him grow within the course of the book.

The real draw of this book (and I suspect the whole series) is the setting. West Africa is no paradise, and Wilson shows us this. It's corrupt and violent, with miles of distance between the haves and the have-nots. Despite the fact that it has been decades since the region has been under direct European Imperial rule, one of the central issues, Wilson reminds us, is that the Europeans never left. They come back, fulfill their own interests (be it diamonds, be it political instability), and then leave while West Africa is force to pick up the pieces. Moreover, Wilson also makes it clear that this situation exists because native born African elites benefit by it. But even more basically, Wilson evokes a place that is hot, humid, and depressed. Wilson's efforts to instill a sense of indignation in his reader is a success.

On the whole, I did like "The Big Killing," although not as much as I expected to when I flipped through it. That's a little unfair on my part, I suppose. Hopefully, with more realistic expectations, I can enjoy the rest of the Medway series.
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