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eBook Tooth and Nail epub

by Ian Rankin

eBook Tooth and Nail epub
  • ISBN: 0752866826
  • Author: Ian Rankin
  • Genre: Suspense
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Orion Pub Co; CD-ROM edition (May 2004)
  • ePUB size: 1112 kb
  • FB2 size 1783 kb
  • Formats rtf azw lit lrf


Praise for Ian Rankin. Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award.

Praise for Ian Rankin. Rankin weaves his plot with a menacing eas. is prose is understated, yet his canvas of Scotland’s criminal underclass has a panoramic breadth. He is the recipient of four Crime Writers’ Association Dagger Awards including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005 and in 2009 was inducted into the CWA Hall of Fame. In 2004, Ian won America’s celebrated Edgar award for Resurrection Men.

The Black Book is a 1993 crime novel by Ian Rankin, the fifth of the Inspector Rebus novels. It is the first book to feature Siobhan Clarke and Morris Gerald Cafferty appears as a main character. It is also the first book where Rebus is based at St Leonards police station. Rebus finds himself with a number of problems on his hands.

Ian Rankin is also the recipient of honorary degrees from the universities of Abertay, St Andrews, Edinburgh, Hull and the Open University. Rankin is a N. bestseller in the UK and has received the OBE for services to literature, opting to receive the prize in his home city of Edinburgh, where he lives with his partner and two sons.

Ian Rankin has been elected a Hawthornden Fellow, and is also a past winner of the Chandler-Fulbright Award. Thus opens Tooth and Nail, the third novel in Ian Rankin’s venerable series of detective novels featuring Inspector Rebus. He is the recipient of four Crime Writers' Association Dagger Awards including the prestigious Diamond Dagger in 2005. In 2004, Ian won America's celebrated Edgar Award for 'Resurrection Men'. The trouble starts virtually as soon as Rebus makes contact with Inspector George Flight, who has been assigned as his partner: Flight can’t understand a word he says because of Rebus’ strong Scottish accent.

You could say what you liked about the Wolfman, he wasn’t choosy about his turf. This time it was a riverside path. Not that Flight had ever really thought of the Lea as a ‘river’. Apparently you could walk the course of the Lea from the Thames to up past Edmonton.

Publisher: Orion Press, 1992

Publisher: Orion Press, 1992. Rebus is drafted in by Scotland Yard to help track down a cannibalistic serial killer called the Wolfman, whose first victim was found in the East End of London’s lonely Wolf Street. His London colleague, George Flight, isn’t happy at what he sees as interference, and Rebus encounters racial prejudice as well as the usual dangers of trying to catch a vicious killer

I would like a refund. I didn't think the main character did much, if anything, in the way of solving the crime, SPOILERS. I wanted to read several crime novels that were considered accurate for the genre, as being the child of a police officer, I often find it hard to suspend disbelief when reading a crime novel when I find inaccuracies.

Tooth and Nail is the third novel by Ian Rankin featuring Inspector John Rebus. The pace of which the story moves further is marvellous. Rebus is sent to London to help detectives hunt a serial killer dubbed the Wolfman by the press. Rankin does well, yet again, in immersing his readers in the world of British crime fiction with a touch of his own. A reader will like to read this book in a sitting or two. Not more than that.

Tooth and Nail is a 1992 crime novel by Ian Rankin, originally entitled Wolfman. It is the third of the Inspector Rebus novels. Rebus is drafted in by Scotland Yard to help track down a cannibalistic serial killer called the Wolfman, whose first victim was found in the East End of London's lonely Wolf Street. His London colleague, George Flight, isn't happy at what he sees as interference, and Rebus encounters racial prejudice as well as the usual dangers of trying to catch a vicious killer.

Comments: (7)
Phenade
A serial murderer dubbed The Wolfman by the press has killed and mutilated three women in London, one a month. The pressure is on the police to catch the killer before panic spreads further. Now, someone at New Scotland Yard has written to Edinburgh to request help from Inspector John Rebus, much to his surprise. Whoever it is has mistaken Rebus for an expert on serial murder, because the difficult case he had solved was very personal and held few lessons for other investigators. But orders are orders. And no sooner does he arrive in London than he learns from the radio that The Wolfman has killed a fourth woman.

Thus opens Tooth and Nail, the third novel in Ian Rankin’s venerable series of detective novels featuring Inspector Rebus. The trouble starts virtually as soon as Rebus makes contact with Inspector George Flight, who has been assigned as his partner: Flight can’t understand a word he says because of Rebus’ strong Scottish accent. Practically everyone else in the homicide department resents his having been called in—and they’re not the least bit shy about showing it. They can’t understand him, either.

No reader of the series will be surprised to learn that matters soon go further downhill. The disagreeable Scot manages to alienate all his new colleagues at Scotland Yard by ignoring established procedure and disappearing without explanation to investigate on his own. Since this is fiction, we’re confident that Inspector Rebus will eventually identify and catch the killer, and in short order. However, there’s a great deal of confusion and conflict before that happens, and Rebus is saved from arrest himself only because he manages to resolve the case.

In a sense, Tooth and Nail is a traditional whodunit, since many suspects surface in the course of the investigation and Rebus’ job, above all, is to sort through them to find the one who is guilty. But Rankin is a much more skillful writer than most. He manages to create a credible portrait of his difficult hero and to convey a sense that he fully understands police procedure. This is one detective novel that’s genuinely suspenseful to the end. The conclusion took me by surprise—and that doesn’t happen all that often. This is a very satisfying read.
LØV€ YØỮ
This is a good police procedural story, well told, with characters who, after a few books in the series, seem like old friends. Flawed, damaged goods perhaps, but who doesn't have a few friends like that? It is fun to spend a few hours watching Inspector Rebus solve a crime. You should meet Inspector Rebus. I think you will like him.
Manona
I'm baaaaaack!

After reading the first Rebus novel (Knots and Crosses), I knew I'd continue to read the rest of Ian Rankin's excellent crime fiction stories.

This is actually the third novel in the Inspector Rebus series, and author Ian Rankin's prose continues to astound me. He masterfully weaves a tapestry of plot, character, and location throughout nearly every page (Example from the prologue: `She drives home the knife. The moment, she knows from past experience, is a very intimate one. Her hand is gripped around the knife's cool handle and the thrust takes the blade into the throat up to the hilt until her hand meets the throat itself. Flesh upon flesh. Jacket first, or woollen jersey, cotton shirt or T-shirt, then flesh. Now rent. The knife is writhing, like an animal sniffing. Warm blood covering hilt and hand. (The other hand covers the mouth, stifling screams.) The moment is complete. A meeting. Touching. The body hot, gaping, warm with blood. Seething inside, as insides become outsides. Boiling. The moment is coming to an end all too soon.')

But this time we're no longer in Edinburgh. No? No. Inspector Rebus is sent to London (Oh the pain!) to try and help catch a serial killer whom the local coppers can't pin down. They've nick-named the murderer "The Wolfman", because he bites the victims on the stomach after he kills them. But why send Rebus? Well, in Knots and Crosses, he helped find another serial killer in Edinburgh, and so George Flight (a local London CID guy) requested Scotland's "expert". Rebus sees himself as anything BUT an expert on such things, but reluctantly goes to England's capital to do what he can.

Come to find out, he can do quite a bit; including getting into lots of trouble. He falls for a beautiful psychologist named Liza Frazer (who might have connections with the killer!), disappears for hours or days on end, drinks like a fish, and goes on television and announces that they've caught the killer (even when he knows they haven't). But Rebus' mind works a bit differently than most folks. He can worm his way into a killer's mind as the case unfolds. And we again see how Rebus' past comes to the forefront and aids him in capturing the villain.

The great thing about Rebus is that he's so f#$%ed up that the reader can identify with all of his vices and character flaws. He's no superhuman, and he knows it. But what he does have is a nose for killers, and this bodes poorly for them. Because once Rebus is on your trail, you'll never get away.

Now, it's on to the next in the series!
Ber
I quite like this police procedural series. The protagonist is an Edinburgh homicide detective who unwillingly is becoming a specialist in serial killers. He is a bit of a jerk, but likable, and like all interesting characters, he is changing as the series progresses.
Inabel
One of Ian Rankin's earliest Inspector Rebus Novels... Although I've tried to read them in order, I have missed quite a few of these earlier ones, in which the Inspector doesn't have as much history behind him, yet. Interesting to read them out of order. I'm also thinking that in Rankin's earlier novels there is a bit more "blood and guts" than one finds in his later Rebus novels.

I'm addicted to Inspector Rebus, so am very happy to have found this early one for sale. Tooth and Nail: An Inspector Rebus Novel (Inspector Rebus Novels)
Darksinger
All these Inspector Rebus books (I've now read 4) are good , well constructed stories. I have trouble following the dialog sometimes due to Scotch and English phrases. Also. a not completely likeable protagonist(which Ifind realistic). The last one I read had an annoyingly large number of characters to track. Otherwise, entertaining and enjoyable easy reading.
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