eBook The Edge epub

by Dick Francis

eBook The Edge epub
  • ISBN: 0449217191
  • Author: Dick Francis
  • Genre: Suspense
  • Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Fawcett (January 29, 1990)
  • ePUB size: 1791 kb
  • FB2 size 1704 kb
  • Formats docx txt lit azw


But he's also a crackerjack orchestrator of suspense, and there are pockets of tension in this book that had me on the edge of my seat.

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). But he's also a crackerjack orchestrator of suspense, and there are pockets of tension in this book that had me on the edge of my seat. Even though he's handy in a scrap, Tor is a thinking man's hero. I appreciate the cerebral finishing move he lays on Filmer to ensure that the villain is caught out proper.

THE EDGE - G+ Francis, Dick - 27th book. Dick Francis has tons of books and all of the dust jackets are pretty much identical. A Great Transcontinental Mystery Race, a glittering rail junket that not only promises the opportunity to race a thoroughbred on some of the world's great courses, but something more: an intriguing mystery to be enacted on board, which passengers will be invited to solve. I really didn't When I started reading books in the adult section of the library in the early 1980s, Dick Francis was already a prolific author and all over the shelves. To this day, his books are everywhere to be found, in thrift stores, garage sales, and hand me downs from relatives.

Books by Dick Francis. THE SPORT OF QUEENS (autobiography). The dick francis library.

Richard Stanley Francis CBE FRSL (31 October 1920 – 14 February 2010) was a British crime writer, and former steeplechase jockey, whose novels centre on horse racing in England. After wartime service in the RAF, Francis became a full-time jump-jockey, winning over 350 races and becoming champion jockey of the British National Hunt.

Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys

Dick Francis was one of the most successful post-war National Hunt jockeys. The winner of over 350 races, he was champion jockey in 1953/1954 and rode for HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, most famously on Devon Loch in the 1956 Grand National. During his lifetime Dick Francis received many awards, amongst them the prestigious Crime Writers' Association's Cartier Diamond Dagger for his outstanding contribution to the genre, and three 'best novel' Edgar Allan Poe awards from The Mystery Writers of America. In 1996 he was named by them as Grand Master for a lifetime's achievement.

A high-class, transcontinental horse-racing junket should be an idyllic getaway for the super-rich. But one passenger on this train is a sociopath, a genius at blackmail and criminal corruption-and he plans to take everyone for everything they’ve got. About The Edge. A high-class, transcontinental horse-racing junket should be an idyllic getaway for the super-rich. Also in A Dick Francis Novel

Read online books written by Dick Francis in our e-reader absolutely for free

Read online books written by Dick Francis in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of The Edge, Shattered, Come to Grief at ReadAnyBook. But one passenger on this train is a sociopath, a genius at blackmail and criminal corruption-and he plans to take everyone for everything they've got. show more.

Always like reading mr francis books just close now it always bothers me that u have to write mire than great book. Always like reading mr francis books just close now it always bothers me that u have to write mire than great book. by K Me on March 26, 2017. A Dick Francis Novel.

This Francis novel combines racehorses with a Canadian rail excursion

This Francis novel combines racehorses with a Canadian rail excursion. If you love trains, this is the Francis novel for you. While the hero, Tor Kelsey is trying to outthink a villain, the race train riders are having a murder mystery enacted by professional actors. But who are the actors and who are the real villains? Take this thrilling ride to find out. The Edge - Is it a railroad or horse racing mystery?

"A tour de force...A steadily high level of interest, comedy, suspense, and surprise."THE ATLANTIC The Great Transcontinental Mystery Race is not only a glittering rail junket that promises the oportunity to race a thoroughbred on some of the world's great courses, but is something more: an intriguing mystery will be enacted on board, which passengers will be invited to solve. But included on the guest list is one Julius Apollo Filmer, justifiably reputed to be the most ruthless operator lurking in the racing underworld, and he's planning a strange plot of his own. For Tor Kelsey, undercover security agent for the British Jockey Club, a scenario of imaginary mayhem is about to explode into a nightmare of real and bloody murder.
Comments: (7)
Dawncrusher
Why doesn't anyone proofread Kindle versions?
Like other reviewers, I've read this book multiple times, and enjoyed the audio versions, too. It's one of my all time favorites. Now I have it on my Kindle, and am reading it there for the first time.
I wish there were some way to guarantee the quality of a Kindle book. Apparently the books are scanned in, and very little checking is done to ensure that the words are correct. I just found "the path would" instead of "the path wound" and "Cucumber" instead of "Cumber," the abbreviated form of a character's first name. There have been several other instances that I've noticed in this book, but not noted down.
I have registered complaints about Kindle versions before, and even offered to proofread some of them for free, if the corrections would be made. Kindle readers deserve the same quality as readers of hardback and paperback versions of the book, and they're not getting it.
ZEr0
It's time again for My-Every-Other-Review-is-a-Dick-Francis-Review Theater. Okay, if I had to pick three faves from Francis' roster of protagonists, I must roll with Rob Finn (NERVE), Kit Fielding (BREAK IN, BOLT), and Torquil Kelsey (THE EDGE). So let's talk about Tor Kelsey. THE EDGE came out in 1988 and thrilled me to bits. It introduced us to Mr. Kelsey who, true to Francis' hero blueprint, is unassuming and unremarkable looking. He tends to fade into the background. Ah, but he means to do that purposely. See, Tor is an undercover security agent for the Jockey Club, has been for three years now, and his chameleon act is an indispensable knack. What I dig about Tor is that he's independently well-off, came into his sizable inheritance some time ago. He doesn't have to work ever again for the rest of his life. Before this, he'd been mucking around for years, traveling, seeing the world, seeking purpose. He's found it with the Jockey Club, helping put away them nefarious nogoodniks. I love that, always, always, Tor Kelsey feels the need to cultivate that taste for plain bread. He sees with great acuity the peril of succumbing to his wealth.

On to the crux of the matter. England's Jockey Club had been forever trying to get the goods on Julius Apollo Filmer, him what's an infamous blackmailer, an expert witness intimidator, a frightener of the first order, and suspected murderer. But Filmer is silky smooth and cautious and slippery, and the Jockey Club would've had more luck picking up a dingleberry by its clean end. When word gets 'round that Filmer had wheedled himself a spot on a highly publicized luxury transcontinental train set to navigate the breadth of the wild Canadian interior, imagine the furor that went down within the Canadian Jockey Club. "Can't you keep your villains in check?" rails Canadian Jockey Club to English Jockey Club. So here's Tor Kelsey presented as a halfway panacea. Tor's job is to be anonymously onboard that train - the one what's on a goodwill tour to promote Canadian horseracing - there to sniff out potential shady shenanigans perpetrated by Filmer.

I've rarely had more fun reading a Dick Francis novel. See, in tone, his books tend to be these buttoned-down reads broken up with moments of shocking mayhem and brutality. What THE EDGE offers up is this sustained feel of spirited high adventure. It feels like a jaunt. On board the Transcontinental Mystery Race Train, can our undercover agent foil the insidious big bad who must surely be up to something? Can he do this without giving himself away? Because that's part of the mission goal, to come away unscathed and undiscovered so that he can go right back into the field and suss out further rascality.

Yeah, the Transcontinental Mystery Race Train. I haven't even mentioned the murder mystery what's staged by a hired acting troupe as further amusement for the well-heeled passengers. I love mystery trains! And Tor, busy gent, inadvertently becomes embroiled in the execution of that.

Francis expertly juggles a substantial cast, ranging from blue blood to blue collar, an impressive number of whom manage to keep your interest. Witness our secret agent man subtly rub elbows with the Lorrimores, Canada's golden (yet troubled) family. See him hob nob with the colorful acting troupe. See him, on the sly, romance Nell, the tactful travel coordinator. And Francis does something else that's amazing. He makes Tor's phone conversations with his racing liaison, the very sharp, very ill Mrs. Baudelaire, into these emotional experiences. This writer is so adroit at hitting you in the feels, so dexterous and sly in his observations about class distinctions and, essentially, about what makes us tick. He writes these things with seeming ease and with consummate finesse. But he's also a crackerjack orchestrator of suspense, and there are pockets of tension in this book that had me on the edge of my seat. Even though he's handy in a scrap, Tor is a thinking man's hero. I appreciate the cerebral finishing move he lays on Filmer to ensure that the villain is caught out proper. Often times I wished that Francis had written sequels about this and that character, but never more so than with Tor Kelsey, the invisible man, the quiet storm, the Jockey Club's plain-bread-eating, rich-as-Croesus secret weapon.
Moonworm
Francis' books are really not detective stories, or more precisely, not searching for criminals, but for insight. Questions such as - What causes hate? Where does free will start? Can we control wickedness? Whence courage? Where does love arise? Why? Mental illness inborn? How to reach the heart?

The puzzle -

''What made one man good, I wondered, and another man bad: one man to seek to build, the other to frighten and destroy. The acid irony was that the bad might feel more satisfied and fulfilled than the good''

So true!

This work does outstanding job of presenting questions and finding answers. In fact, dialogue refers to Hamlet several times. This work borrows from that drama. Great!

For example, the villain is confronted with one outraged victim -

'' 'You told me Lenny would give evidence against me, and I didn’t know you’d frightened the poor boy with such a terrible threat. You told me he hated me and would be glad to tell lies about me.'
The enormity of it almost choked her.
'I don’t know how you can live with yourself. I don’t know how anyone can be so full of sin.'
Her voice resonated with the full old meaning of the word: an offense against God. It was powerful, I thought, and it had silenced Filmer completely.''

Wonderful drama!

Another relentless revelation -
''“You can’t prove any of this,” Filmer said defiantly.
“We all believe,” said Bill Baudelaire’s voice, “that with you, Mr. Filmer, it is the urge to crush people and make them suffer that sets you going. We know you could afford to buy good horses. We know that for you simply owning horses isn’t enough.”

Cruelty for enjoyment - what a motive! Wow!

''But why should anyone do that?”
“Grow up, sonny. There are people in this world who cause trouble because it makes them feel important. They’re ineffective, eh?, in their lives. So they burn things and smash things, paint slogans on walls ... leave their mark on something, eh? And wreck trains. Put slabs of concrete on the rails. I’ve seen it done. Power over others, that’s what it’s about. A grudge against the Lorrimores, most like. Power over them, over their possessions. That’s what those investigators think.”

This is wickedness as sin, not sickness. What a relief!

This work is written as a constant conflict of good vs evil, righteousness vs wickedness.

And yet, Francis does not fall into self-righteousness. He shows not all badness is wicked choise. For example, one youth is uncovered with a history of torturing cats. Narrative notes -

''I wasn’t so sure about that: didn’t know to what extent she was responsible for his behavior. But perhaps not much. Perhaps no one deserved a son like Sheridan. Perhaps people like Sheridan were born that way, as if without arms.''

This is not just blanket condemnation, but awareness of human weakness. Many other careful insights, all done smoothly and with taste.

Wonderful!

I read this years ago in paperback. Lost it. This time on kindle (won't lose it!). Like kindle better, highlights and fonts.

(Did not find any errors or problems with kindle edition. Great!)
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