» » Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines

eBook Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines epub

by Kevin Kelly

eBook Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines epub
  • ISBN: 1857023080
  • Author: Kevin Kelly
  • Genre: Techno
  • Subcategory: Computer Science
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate; New Ed edition (1995)
  • Pages: 528 pages
  • ePUB size: 1327 kb
  • FB2 size 1872 kb
  • Formats mobi rtf lrf azw


Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so. .So, why 10 months? Kevin Kelly is very wordy

Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things. So, why 10 months? Kevin Kelly is very wordy. Yes, Kelly provides fascinating insights and revelations about machine biology, "hive mind" theory, co-evolution, the evolution of computers, and the future of planet Earth. But he does all of this with about 200 pages more than are actually necessary to make his point. Kelly is a great writer, no doubt, but he tends to wander aimlessly, which makes these difficult topics challenging to understand.

KEVIN KELLY wrote the preface to Out of Control while he was living in.

KEVIN KELLY wrote the preface to Out of Control while he was living in the closed system of the Biosphere 2 project in Arizona. Titbits of information, covering everything from computers to government, litter the page like McNuggets. Brooks wants to flood the world with inexpensive, small, ubiquitous, semi- thinking things that will be less like R2D2s, serving us beers, and more like an ecology of unnamed 'things' just out of sight.

NEceownoRmulyes for the New. Also by Kevin Kelly. The new economy is about communication, deep and wide. OUT OF CONTROL: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World. Communication is the founda-tion of society, of our culture, of our humanity, of our own individual identity, and of all economic systems. This is why networks are such a big deal.

Basic Books, 1994 - 521 من الصفحات. This is a book about how our manufactured world has become so complex that the only way to create yet more complex things is by using the principles of biology. This means decentralized, bottom up control, evolutionary advances and error-honoring institutions. I also get into the new laws of wealth in a network-based economy, what the Biosphere 2 project in Arizona has or has not to teach us, and whether large systems can predict or be predicted. And more: restoration biology, encryption, a-life, and the lessons of hypertext

the New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World.

the New Biology of Machines, Social Systems and the Economic World. 3 Machines with an Attitude 28 Entertaining machines with bodies 28 Fast, cheap and out of control 37 Getting smart from dumb things 41 The virtues of nested hierarchies 44 Using the real world to communicate 46 No intelligence without bodies 48 Mind/body black patch psychosis 49. 4 Assembling Complexity 55 Biology: the future of machines 55 Restoring a prairie with fire and oozy seeds 58 Random paths to a stable ecosystem 60 How to do everything at once 62 The Humpty Dumpty challenge 65. 5 Coevolution.

Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines .

Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things. a really inspiring book that takes me along a path of all things that have guided me in the past to making software. robots, life simulations, game theory, system thinking, ecosystems. this book made me google a lot and this is one I will have to read once a year! Читать весь отзыв. Пользовательский отзыв - tgraettinger - LibraryThing.

Kevin Kelly is very wordy. But he does all of this with about 200 pages more than are actually necessary Don't let the fact that it took me 10 months to finish this book impact your decision to read it; Out of Control was a well-worthy, remarkable effort, which should be given a careful and thorough read. Nature Creates New Things Out of Nothing Every Day. By Thriftbooks. com User, June 3, 2003. This book must have been as much fun for Kevin Kelly to write as it is to read. It's a little long but very easy to understand. It'll make you think and you are sure to enjoy thinking about the ideas and examples in here. A more correct title might be "Out of Centralized Control.

Kevin Kelly's most notable book-length publication, Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Social Systems, and the Economic World (1994), presents a view on the mechanisms of complex organization. The central theme of the book is that several fields of contemporary science and philosophy point in the same direction: intelligence is not organized in a centralized structure but much more like a bee-hive of small simple components. He applies this view to bureaucratic organisations, intelligent computers, and to the human brain

movies All video latest This Just In Prelinger Archives Democracy Now! Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip Library. Top. Animation & Cartoons Arts & Music Computers & Technology Cultural & Academic Films Ephemeral Films Movies News & Public Affairs.

Hard to Find book
Comments: (7)
Nawenadet
Don't let the fact that it took me 10 months to finish this book impact your decision to read it; Out of Control was a well-worthy, remarkable effort, which should be given a careful and thorough read.

So, why 10 months? Kevin Kelly is very wordy. Yes, Kelly provides fascinating insights and revelations about machine biology, "hive mind" theory, co-evolution, the evolution of computers, and the future of planet Earth. But he does all of this with about 200 pages more than are actually necessary to make his point. Kelly is a great writer, no doubt, but he tends to wander aimlessly, which makes these difficult topics challenging to understand. A good editor would have helped immensely.

Out of control also suffers from a lack of cohesion, and would be better served as a collection of separate essays about each topic, rather than a book that strives to espouse one overarching theme. As I was reading, I kept wondering where Kelly was going with all of his ideas, as a lack of drive seemed evident.

Lest you think I have nothing but ill contempt for this book, there is a payoff: Kelly is a brilliant soothsayer, of sorts. This book was written 16 years ago, so hindsight can readily be applied, and Kelly's predictions about where science would be with relation to computers, nanotechnology, pharmaceuticals, this crazy thing called the "Internet" he kept mentioning, have nearly all come to fruition. Does this mean machines and computers develop their own biology, and begin truly thinking for themselves, as Kelly suggests? Time will only tell.
caif
What a book! I will be thinking about the concepts and ideas presented in this book for a long, long time. Kelly is a little more at home writing magazine articles, and sometimes the book lacks a coherent thesis, but that is more than made up for with wonderful prose, and an unbridled excitement for his subject.

This book attempts to dissect the study of the unpredictable. From biological evolution to artificial intelligence to economies, it examines how and why complex, unpredictable systems form, and how they can be managed and created.

This book was written in 1994, but it very rarely feels dated. The problems and concepts that technology was dealing with have become, if anything, more embedded and more interesting now. This book is a wonderful guide to anyone trying to navigate today's networked world.
GWEZJ
I must admit that I'm a little ticked at spending a considerable amount of time reading a 500 page book with too many ideas and lack of focus. The editing left a lot to be desired. Throughout the book, the author asserts that if dumb, simple things (e.g. a swarm of bees) continuously communicate with each other they will eventually become capable of performing highly complex tasks not feasible by the will of intelligent beings. Yet, this point is expressed in such a complex manner that it makes one wonder why the author didn't follow his philosophy by dumbing down his arguments and letting the plentiful explain the more difficult concepts.

The main premise of the book is the idea of intelligent beings, in this case humans, giving up control of their creations, which are machines, and letting them "adapt on their own, evolve in their own direction, and grow without human oversight."

There are some intriguing ideas such as: No sustaining ecosystem is in equilibrium or completely "in control". Some chaotic or "out of control" events are required for complex systems to function. For example, the earth's atmosphere is made up of 20% oxygen. This oxygen content is just enough to maintain viable ecosystems without burning up the earth from fires.

"Out of Control" was written in 1994, and 14 years later global warming is a hot button. What happened to the Kelly's grand ideas of recycling (see example of Danish companies recycling each others' waste somewhere in the book)? How much closer are we to eco-friendly intelligent homes and personal belongings? Instead of moving to cheap renewable energy sources, we are experiencing the use of fossil fuels like never before with the fast growing economies of China and India. Crucial counteracting forces seemed to have been completely ignored by the author in projecting a sea of changes in how humans behave. Solar energy will never succeed as a viable energy source unless Big Oil has a monopoly over the sun. Digital cash has been a failure because its success would've destroyed the profits of Visa/Mastercard.

The author is a proponent of the idea of passing down learned behavior innately to offsprings, i.e. through genes. For example, experiments cited from one scientist proved evolution with learned behavior passed down to offsprings is superior to natural evolution. In this instance the author ignored the prospect of passing down negative and undesirable learned behavior that is criminal in nature for example. It's best that all offsprings are created much like computers, and most behavior is learned much like software. It is precisely individuality that facilitates variability, the hallmark of evolution. The author himself even argues for systems thriving at the edge of chaos; systems flexible enough to adapt to the changing environment, yet not rigid enough to become unadaptable. Passing down learned behavior to offsprings would undoubtedly create a more rigid system. Besides, most people already harbor the ill effects of bad parenting. The last thing they need is to acquire this cr*p at conception.

At the end of the book, Mr. Kelly mentions "The Nine Laws of God". One law in particular stood out: "Grow by chunking" which states "The only way to make a complex system that works is to begin with a simple system that works. Attempts to instantly install highly complex organization-such as intelligence or a market economy-without growing it, inevitably lead to failure..... Time is needed to let each part test itself against all the others...." The failure to observe this law has been aptly demonstrated in the U.S. effort to build democracy in Iraq, and to a lesser degree the pressure exerted on Russia by the west to quickly move to a market economy following the collapse of communism.

In spite of all the criticism, I'm glad I read this book. The ideas could have been expressed in 200 pages fewer and more coherently. Pick up a copy and fasten your seat belt. You will be riding this one for a while.
Rindyt
Those who have watched the Matrix trilogy a lot of times or those who have loved seeing Kevin Kelly at TED: you guys should really read this book. It starts with a startling description of a situation where people and their environment are a synthesis of natural, organic and technological stuff. The whole book is high-quality food for people hungry for a reflective dive into the pros and cons of humanity's inevitable impulses towards new sophistication in intellectual and practical aspects of life without losing sight of the risks of such an adventure. We were born and we made things and grew others. How ready are we to transcend the distinction between making and growing and apply such a unified practice even to ourselves? This is one of the deep questions the book helps us deal with.
Malak
This is the best sciency book out of the two dozen or so I've read this year. He doesn't just beat you over the head with basic knowledge in one subject. His chapter topics range far and wide and give you enough to get you interested. I've been going through the bibliography to see what books I could read next to explore certain subjects deeper. There were a lot of surprising things I want to learn more about. Did you know the DOD had a desert-war computer simulation that played out the Gulf War before it happened? SimCity and Populous were born of genuine simulation research? Entire ecosystems have been surviving for years sealed in glass jars? This book is loaded.
eBooks Related to Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020