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eBook Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age epub

by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger

eBook Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age epub
  • ISBN: 0691150362
  • Author: Viktor Mayer-Schönberger
  • Genre: Techno
  • Subcategory: History & Culture
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; Revised ed. edition (July 25, 2011)
  • Pages: 272 pages
  • ePUB size: 1562 kb
  • FB2 size 1347 kb
  • Formats mbr lrf mbr doc


Viktor Mayer-Schönberger (born 1966) is. .

Viktor Mayer-Schönberger (born 1966) is Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford. Earlier he spent ten years on the faculty of Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make . Delete is an eye-opening book that will help us remember how to forget in the digital age. Скачать (pdf, 816 Kb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances.

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger argues that we should be less troubled by the fleetingness of our digital records .

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger argues that we should be less troubled by the fleetingness of our digital records than by the way they can linger. --Adam Keiper, Wall Street Journal. If the gathering, storage, and processing of information puts us all in the center of a digital panopticon, the failure to forget creates a panopticon crossbred with a time-travel machine.

Viktor Mayer-Schonberger has made a compelling dissection of our current state of digital memory and what ramifications it.The premise of this book lured me in. In this digital age we are now faced with never forgetting any, an important human trait.

Viktor Mayer-Schonberger has made a compelling dissection of our current state of digital memory and what ramifications it has for our cognitive understanding of time, culture, and privacy.

Mayer-Schönberger it is the basis for negative implications both small and large. challenges-and even help to shift control over information back to the individual

Mayer-Schönberger it is the basis for negative implications both small and large. These concerns are based on at least two fundamental observations. First, in the. current form of our digital age our capacity as individuals to control information. is vastly reduced (p. 90). Second, and more speculatively, it constitutes a radical. challenges-and even help to shift control over information back to the individual. Delete: the virtue of forgetting in the digital age. While the efficacy and feasibility of Mayer-Schönberger’s solution is something that. is debatable, such a nuanced and critical engagement of ideas is clearly what is. needed at this point in time, and is welcome reading.

Mayer-Schönberger persuasively illustrates how, since the dawn of time, the default mode of information management by humans and societies has necessarily been to forget-as remembering comes with high inherent costs

Mayer-Schönberger persuasively illustrates how, since the dawn of time, the default mode of information management by humans and societies has necessarily been to forget-as remembering comes with high inherent costs.

Download books for free. Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor. Издание: With a New afterword by the author. ISBN 13: 9781400838455. ISBN: 978-0-691-13861-.

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well.

Viktor Mayer-Schönberger is the Professor of Internet Governance and Regulation at Oxford. A long article on 'digital hoarding' refers to Viktor Mayer-Schönbeger's book Delete: The Virtue of Forgetting in the Digital Age and quotes him extensively. Earlier he spent ten years on the faculty of Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. 15 August 2015 The Economist.

Delete looks at the surprising phenomenon of perfect remembering in the digital age, and reveals why we must reintroduce our capacity to forget. Digital technology empowers us as never before, yet it has unforeseen consequences as well. Potentially humiliating content on Facebook is enshrined in cyberspace for future employers to see. Google remembers everything we've searched for and when. The digital realm remembers what is sometimes better forgotten, and this has profound implications for us all.

In Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger traces the important role that forgetting has played throughout human history, from the ability to make sound decisions unencumbered by the past to the possibility of second chances. The written word made it possible for humans to remember across generations and time, yet now digital technology and global networks are overriding our natural ability to forget--the past is ever present, ready to be called up at the click of a mouse. Mayer-Schönberger examines the technology that's facilitating the end of forgetting--digitization, cheap storage and easy retrieval, global access, and increasingly powerful software--and describes the dangers of everlasting digital memory, whether it's outdated information taken out of context or compromising photos the Web won't let us forget. He explains why information privacy rights and other fixes can't help us, and proposes an ingeniously simple solution--expiration dates on information--that may.

Delete is an eye-opening book that will help us remember how to forget in the digital age.

Comments: (7)
Mmsa
This book is not going to be to everyone's liking because it divides into two distinct section. In the beginning, the book deals with large, abstract ideas about human history and memory. The author argues that in the analog world forgetting was the norm and remembering was hard because it was difficult to store information in an easily accessible and permanent form. The author's discussion here is fascinating, as he points out how analog information slowly decays as it is copied (think of the hiss in a cassette recording of a previous cassette tape or the blurriness of a mimeograph of a mimeograph), the medium for storage disintegrates over time, and information in these forms is hard to index. By contrast, in the digital realm remembering becomes the default because digital information is easy to back up and cheap to store. In addition, deleting digital information requires effort: As anybody who has let a huge electronic photo library unwittingly build up realizes, it takes time to go through all those photos and decide which ones to keep. Forgetting is no longer effortless.

Mayer-Schonberger then argues that there are serious social problems associated with this change that most people have failed to fully understand. Perhaps his largest concern is that perfect digital memory will freeze how someone is perceived because a perfect record of a person's past deeds or misdeeds will create an illusion that we know the person's character and thereby deny the reality that people change over time. He also believes that perfect memory will overwhelm us with meaningless data that will make it hard to decide how to act. He also points out that some information is more easily digitized than others, so the digital record is incomplete and will distort our decision-making when we assume its comprehensiveness. Here I thought he missed an opportunity to talk about the general trend toward quantitative analysis at the expense of qualitative analysis. These two trends--quantitative analysis and the rise of digital computing and digital memory--obviously are mutually reinforcing.

I found the first part of the book to be a fascinating and insightful, if also unsettling, read. Perhaps because of my background in philosophy, I enjoyed his big-picture cultural analysis.

The second part of the book is rather different. Here he comes back to Earth and looks at some proposed solutions, ultimately favoring a modest and speculative proposal for expiration dates for digital records. This part of the book is thematically related to the first but gets deeper in the weeds than many readers might be expecting after the 30,000-foot analysis of the first part of the book. This part of the book is probably of interest to a narrower group of readers and in some ways seems more targeted to academics or professionals in the field than to a general readership, unlike the first part of the book that could appeal to anyone interested in culture and history.

Mayer-Schonberger's writing is exceptionally clear and well-organized but can be repetitive. Whether that is a good thing depends upon how you're reading the book. If you're tackling it over a long period of time or are listening with distractions to the audio book, the repetitions and reminders of what has come before are useful, but if you are reading it in a couple of sittings, you might prefer a leaner style. By the way, I "read" this book mostly be listening to the audiobook, which has excellent narration.

Overall, I liked the book and found it gave me a new lens for thinking about the increasing prominence of computers in society.
superstar
With Delete, Viktor Mayer-Schönberger utilizes historical, philosophical, theoretical, and practical considerations to formulate a compelling insight: For the majority of human existence, he says, remembering has been harder than forgetting; our "external analog memory" (books, film, tape) has been degradable, difficult to store, and sometimes economically inaccessible. Accordingly, our acceptance of the fact that most things would, indeed, be forgotten "helped us humans avoid the fundamental question of whether we would like to remember everything forever if we could" (36). It allowed us to live in the present, and not tethered to the past. But with the emergence of an "external digital memory" -- through the Internet and other technological metadata -- we are confronted with a new paradigm of personal and cultural memory that is, as Mayer-Schönberger says, "lossless, cheap, and easy." We are now being confronted with a future in which everything will be remembered forever, and we are being taken to this fate unwillingly.

Mayer-Schönberger's premise is certainly well-supported. Delete offers a rigorous exposition of memory as a cultural virtue in Greek philosophy and traces its evolving role to the invention of writing (as a form of external memory) and reading (as a form of shared, or social memory), while complicating its position in culture by acknowledging the socioeconomic challenges that obstruct an even distribution of these mediums -- and, in effect, an even distribution of power. The way Mayer-Schönberger establishes the intervention of digital culture is also particularly helpful; our understanding of the Internet as a source of unfailing, perpetual memory is powerfully illustrated by case studies in which entire lives have been derailed by a "drunk pirate" photo on MySpace. But whereas such a premise is, in itself, a fascinating take on our modern situation, Delete fails to live up to its promise for a potential resolution. In fact, by the end of the book, Mayer-Schönberger's entire tone shifts from insightfully theoretical to simplistically resigned.

Spoiler alert, then: Mayer-Schönberger would like to see an Internet (and a tech world) that offers opt-out "expiration dates" for the information we collect and upload. He wants to see an Internet (and a tech world) that respects individual agency, and can come to embrace the forgotten virtue of forgetting.

Of course, this type of conclusion rests on vaguely unrealistic assumptions -- that we all share the same values when it comes to sharing digitally, for example, or that tech companies will put privacy and digital memory issues ahead of their product -- and Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, for one, is clearly not interested in Mayer-Schönberger's business plan. At a public speaking engagement held earlier this year at Stanford University, Zuckerberg said, "We expect this rate [of sharing] will double every 10 years. So in 10 years from now, people will be sharing about 1,000 times as many things as they do today." In other words, the largest social networking site in the world wants us to share more longer, and Facebook is, by design, positioned to become our digital memory monolith.

Interestingly, what Mayer-Schönberger fails to consider is that as this new paradigm of perpetual memory establishes itself, culture will likely respond with a further evolved notion of memory and its significance. Today, a teacher will be fired for her drunk-pirate photo, but in the future, as the Internet continues to collect our digital histories -- lossless, cheap, and easy -- few will be spared from their own embarrassing memories. One day, we will have a President with his or her own drunk-pirate photo on Facebook, and although we'll still laugh, we'll have evolved to care less.
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