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eBook Moths in the Machine: The Power and Perils of Programming epub

by Daniel Kohanski

eBook Moths in the Machine: The Power and Perils of Programming epub
  • ISBN: 0312254067
  • Author: Daniel Kohanski
  • Genre: Techno
  • Subcategory: History & Culture
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition edition (April 10, 2000)
  • Pages: 256 pages
  • ePUB size: 1932 kb
  • FB2 size 1207 kb
  • Formats lit mbr txt lrf


Moths in the Machine book. For better or worse, computers are not literally running our lives.

Moths in the Machine book. Moths in the Machine: The Power and Perils of Programming. They are extraordinarily helpful in all aspects of our daily routines, from banking to transportation, shopping to surgery. On the other hand, a "bug" in a computer program can now lead to dire consequences, making the rule of the computer programmer more valuable than ever before.

Originally titled The philosophical programmer: reflections on the moth in the machine"-T. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Computer programming. New York : St. Martin's Griffin. Originally titled The philosophical programmer: reflections on the moth in the machine"-T. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by PhanS on November 30, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The aim of Moths in the Machine is to give the general reader some understanding of what computer programming is all about, why it is so important - and why it is so difficult - and what are some of the practical and ethical problems that a programmer must face. I expect it will also be useful to beginning programmers, by giving them a solid foundation in a fast-changing craft. The book was originally published in hardcover as The Philosophical Programmer.

Kohanski's preface states: "Yet there has been very little discussion about what programming is and about the . When TPPRMM was reissued in paperback, it was retitled "Moths in the Machine: The Power and Perils of Programming

Kohanski's preface states: "Yet there has been very little discussion about what programming is and about the meaning of programs for our lives. This book tries to look at that question, and to look at it from a philosophical perspective ), the computer. He starts with the first-ever human tool for expanding the power of minds, the medieval clock. When TPPRMM was reissued in paperback, it was retitled "Moths in the Machine: The Power and Perils of Programming. I assume the title change was prompted by criticism of the original title, which implied an emphasis on matters "philosophical".

Kohanski eloquently puts forth the argument for aesthetics in programming, a concept that is being lost as Microsoft et al. focus more and more . Kohanski did a great job of covering the general field and history of programming. focus more and more on "user-friendly" methods of producing code at all levels (object-oriented, scripting, mark-up et. which rely on WYSIWYG interfaces. The nightmare code that emerges out the other end of these hands-off interfaces is making a huge impact on the reusability and therefore productivity of all those end-user produced applications.

the power and perils of programming. 1st St. Martin's Griffin ed. by Daniel Kohanski. Published 2000 by St. Martin's Griffin in New York. In library, Philosophy, Computer programming, Protected DAISY. Includes bibliographical references (p. -236).

In one of the most unorthodox yet necessary programming books ever to appear, Daniel Kohanski, a seasoned programmer and . The Philosophical Programmer. Reflections on the Moth in the Machine.

In one of the most unorthodox yet necessary programming books ever to appear, Daniel Kohanski, a seasoned programmer and systems consultant, delves into the.

With topics ranging from history to aesthetics, from subroutines to ethics, Moths in the Machine will leave even the most inexperienced reader with a deep understanding of the critical role programmers play in the modern world.

Daniel Kohanski keeps this slim volume rooted in valid examples, providing .

Daniel Kohanski keeps this slim volume rooted in valid examples, providing a rich exploration of the thought process involved in machine code. A lucid primer on the philosophy of computer programming from a systems engineer in San Francisco. He then discusses the moths in the machine that challenge programmers: ever more complex programs, demanding an almost inhuman precision; the failure of programmers to translate their own mathematical shorthand into real-world terms (& 54''); and, perhaps most important, the failure to design programs that really do the job, that wont create more problems than they solve.

For better or worse, computers are not literally running our lives. They are extraordinarily helpful in all aspects of our daily routines, from banking to transportation, shopping to surgery. On the other hand, a "bug" in a computer program can now lead to dire consequences, making the rule of the computer programmer more valuable than ever before.In one fo the most unique yet necessary books ever to appear, Daniel Kohanski, a seasoned programmer and systems consultant, provides a breezy and insightful overview of the fascinating craft of computer programming. With topics ranging from history to aesthetics, from subroutines to ethics, Moths in the Machine will leave even the most inexperienced reader with a deep understanding of the critical role programmers play in the modern world.
Comments: (6)
Gavirgas
I liked some of the history in the book, but overall, I think it's ONLY a good read for those not already familiar with the "art" of computer programming. I think if you're already a programmer and have been coding for years, you can pretty much skip this book. I learned some history reading the book, but I didn't think it was a worthwhile use of time (for me). The book mainly talks about aesthetics, the fact that a computer is ONLY a machine, and has no "brain",.. etc. I think pretty much any intelligent being (in the computer field) already knows this.
The parts of the book that covered code might be of some use to someone who wants to experiment with "becoming a programmer," and I guess if you like this book, you will like being a programmer, or perhaps not.
Overall, good book for a non-techie who thinks he/she might be interested in the field.... and probably not the best use of time for someone who's already proficient in the "art".
Ironrunner
Thanks, Daniel, for adding your voice to the discussion about what we do with computers. I have the original hardcover version of this book, and am highly recommending it to my students and programming apprentices. Kohanski eloquently puts forth the argument for aesthetics in programming, a concept that is being lost as Microsoft et al. focus more and more on "user-friendly" methods of producing code at all levels (object-oriented, scripting, mark-up etc.) which rely on WYSIWYG interfaces. The nightmare code that emerges out the other end of these hands-off interfaces is making a huge impact on the reusability and therefore productivity of all those end-user produced applications. This is going to come back to bite us in the end, just like all other programming "shortcuts"! Maybe we can get more people to read books like this and understand what they are actually doing with their machines!
Brol
Kohanski did a great job of covering the general field and history of programming. While his descriptions of programming were basic, they were not overly pedantic.His discussion on binary was excellent.
I will admit that when he gets to the actual discussions on programming logic it became quite difficult for me to follow and much rereading was done. However, completely understanding those chunks was not necessary for going on with the rest of the book.I felt comfortable leaving parts behind.
The glossary provided a nice compendium for information as well and I would encourage readers to turn there if they were having difficulty understanding certain sections.
Overall, a great read.
Alister
As a programmer, I found this book's discussions on the aesthetics of programming to be unique and very helpful. The code samples given were not as interesting, but they were not aimed at experienced programmers. It is a perfect introduction for people who have experience in analyzing data (engineers, actuaries, etc.) but have never programmed. Don't read this book to learn new code tricks, or any specific language; but I've never read anything better about the art of programming, for either the professional or the beginner.
Iraraeal
A great explanation of how the current state of programming came to be. However, the depth of this book is very simplistic, and won't hold the interest of anyone whose done more than a level 100 programming course.
Ueledavi
Really interesting book, I had to read it from cover to cover, non-stop.
Before undertaking the task to became a programmer, read this.
Helps!
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