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eBook Visual Basic 2005 For Dummies epub

by Bill Sempf

eBook Visual Basic 2005 For Dummies epub
  • ISBN: 076457728X
  • Author: Bill Sempf
  • Genre: Techno
  • Subcategory: Programming Languages
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: For Dummies (November 7, 2005)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1108 kb
  • FB2 size 1839 kb
  • Formats lrf txt lit doc


There were lots of nice references in the books for me to use.

Since starting a class where I have to make internet pages, I've realized that I know diddly squat about anything beyond the very basics & nothing about the programs such as VB. In fact, the first time I saw the Visual Basic program I almost hyperventilated because it all looked so foreign & crazy. sometimes there wasn't a lot of explanation for parts of the code & that's not very helpful if you actually want to understand what you are putting in! If I wanted to just copy down random code, I could've done that from the internet for free!

Bill Sempf Programming pro and veteran Wrox author Bill Sempf has thoroughly overhauled the book's organization.

Highlights new VB features and functions, including important advances in compatibility with older VB versions. Offers plain-English explanations of variables, constants, loops, VB syntax, forms, controls, objects, and other fundamentals

Highlights new VB features and functions, including important advances in compatibility with older VB versions. Offers plain-English explanations of variables, constants, loops, VB syntax, forms, controls, objects, and other fundamentals.

by Bill Sempf (Author). This handy guide will take you from the initial steps of writing code to building next–generation applications using all the exciting features of Visual Basic 2005

by Bill Sempf (Author). This handy guide will take you from the initial steps of writing code to building next–generation applications using all the exciting features of Visual Basic 2005. Your computer environment will never be the same! Discover how to.

Thank goodness for the 'Dummies' books! There were lots of nice references in the books for me to use. The only problem is well. sometimes there wasn't a lot of explanation for parts of the code & that's not very helpful if you actually want to understand what you are putting in! If I wanted to just copy down random code, I could've done that from the internet for free! Still, there's lots of helpful bits & pieces in here, so it did help me overall with the course.

I am an absolute novice to Visual Basic for Aplications. This book opened my eyes very quickly and made me feel like a genius in hours

I am an absolute novice to Visual Basic for Aplications. This book opened my eyes very quickly and made me feel like a genius in hours. It is very clearly laid out and the examples are fantastic and so easy to follow. The book comes with fantastic online support, so you not only get to sit at your computer and learn but you get to join a family and workshop your individual issues.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Visual Basic 2005 For Dummies. 2 Mb. 6 Mb. Professional AS. ET Web Services. Andreas Eide, Chris Miller, Bill Sempf, Srinivasa Sivakumar, Mike Batongbacal, Matthew Reynolds, Mike Clark, Brian Loesgen, Robert Eisenberg, Brandon Bohling, Russ Basiura, Don Lee. Category: AS. ET. 5 Mb. Visual Basic 2008 For Dummies. 1. 9 Mb. Offers plain-English explanations of variables, constants, loops, VB syntax, forms, controls, objects, and other fundamentals

Visual Basic 2005 For Dummies.

Visual Basic 2005 For Dummies. In this article, you’ll get started with the classic Hello World program. Although this isn’t the single most exciting application you can build, it helps to make sure that your development environment is set up the best way possible. Setting up Visual Studio. To follow this example, you need to start by running Visual Studio 2005, which is a development environment to build applications in Visual Basic.

Visual Basic is Microsoft's premier programming language, used by more than three million developers and in 50 million Windows applications Programming pro and veteran Wrox author Bill Sempf has thoroughly overhauled the book's organization and content, making it even more accessible to programming beginners Highlights new VB features and functions, including important advances in compatibility with older VB versions Offers plain-English explanations of variables, constants, loops, VB syntax, forms, controls, objects, and other fundamentals The CD-ROM includes all source code and third-party software tools
Comments: (7)
Hulore
Since starting a class where I have to make internet pages, I've realized that I know diddly squat about anything beyond the very basics & nothing about the programs such as VB. In fact, the first time I saw the Visual Basic program I almost hyperventilated because it all looked so foreign & crazy.

Thank goodness for the 'Dummies' books! There were lots of nice references in the books for me to use. The only problem is well... sometimes there wasn't a lot of explanation for parts of the code & that's not very helpful if you actually want to understand what you are putting in! If I wanted to just copy down random code, I could've done that from the internet for free!

Still, there's lots of helpful bits & pieces in here, so it did help me overall with the course. I just recommend for any potential buyers that they find a copy to look through first before plunking down the money for it. You may find that other books could be more helpful than this one is!
Lanadrta
Not enough real examples to build actual code from. Wished it had more real examples, not just explanations of theory.
Ce
The book is a fine work. I don't really use VB 2005 very much but this book makes it comfortable when I do.
Coiriel
The book was written before WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation) which came out in 2006. That is not the reason that I am giving this book a bad score. I just thought that I would mention that for somebody who really is new and does not know that there is a major difference between Windows Forms (technology presented in this book), and WPF (Windows Presentation Foundation). Windows Forms are just used for desktop applications. With WPF, a person can design UI that can work on the web, desktop, and handheld devices (maintenance of one set of code). I checked this book out from my local library, and I though it would not be a big deal that it was old technology, but it was a big deal.

As for why I gave this book 1 star ... the author spends way too much time bashing OOP (Object oriented Programming -- using classes), and not enough time presenting real example code. All of the code are segments of code, and his order of topic presentation is unusual. Plus, the example code is just plain wrong. Although Visual Studio will autocorrect the errors from the book, because they are VB6 style, not .NET style.

The book cannot even be used to learn procedural programming -- either not using classes at all or even just using classes and not writing your own.
Sha
I hate to be the person to ruin the perfect score that this book has acquired, but I simply in good conscience cannot give a five star rating due to some flaws in the methods used to teach VB 2005.

In all fairness however, there exists no single programming book that will be able to suit every individual, at least in my opinion. For some this book could easily be 5 stars, for others much less. I think that much of this is based on the reader's perspective, experience, preferred learning style, and goals.

First the good; the book is very well written. The style that the author uses is clear and concise. The book is an easy read in the sense that it doesn't feel like you're reading a textbook, or rather, a lab report on some obscure organic chemistry finding from 1970. Instead of throwing numbers, statistics, or tables requiring massive amounts of raw memorization, the book allows the reader to jump around and reference the parts that are relevant to their "here and now" issues. The book can be read straight through, or used as a reference, and in either case the introduction and application of the .net backbone is well advocated and mostly easy to understand.

Furthermore, the code examples work and provide for very good, usable programs that the user could build upon should they desire. Rather than just providing for simple programs that are useless, the book demonstrates viable, functional programs which is something that many programming books fail to do. Also, there is a lot of explanation given as to the relevance of class libraries and dll's, and how they tie into a project.

Unfortunately, there are some critical flaws that many will notice if they take the time to really evaluate the techniques this book uses. To start with, this book is not for beginning programmers that lack experience. The author assumes that the reader already knows quite a bit about VB and more specifically, about .net when providing very brief explanations or examples. If the reader has never touched programming before, this book would be a waste of time, and I find it odd that a dummies book would be allowed to require a non-dummy. Fortunately for me, I have done quite a bit of coding in VB 6.0 so most of the time I was familiar with the references the author would make when he used programming lingo that lacked explanation.

Moving on, the teaching method of this book is a big no-no in my opinion. Rather than explain what every command is doing in a program, the book basically says, "here's how you make a program that does "X"", and then the reader is spoon fed a big block of code, often with only one or two commands or lines within the code explained. Making a person a programmer this does not do, rather just copying code from a book that fails to explain the dynamics behind the code resembles data entry more than coding. Anybody can just copy blocks of code and make a windows program in VB, or any other language for that matter, and most people that teach VB strongly suggest against just spoon-feeding code to people and solving their problems for them.

Coming from VB 6.0, I was mostly interested in getting behind the .net framework and utilizing this added power to create much more serious programs. Unfortunately, little advice is given to the 6.0 programmer, and most of the specific .net commands (especially the new ones in 2005) are not presented in a way that the user can utilize that suits their own style, rather we're given a gigantic line of .net specific code and told, "this does that". Rather than explaining how or why each specific property comes into play to produce a result, we're just given a big line or a big block of code and are supposed to just trust that it helps to perform a function that contributes to the results of the final project. The problem this creates is that many people will be likely to write out code because they just happen to know that it performs a certain function, but they don't know WHY it performs this function, and therefore will lack the ability to create custom code to suit their needs.

If I don't know why a command, command property, or event does what it does, then all I can do is memorize lines of code from other people, and mish mash them together to make my own programs.

In any case, this book is probably better suited to the individual that is taking VB 2005 classes and needs another perspective, another reference to aid them. As a standalone product however, I feel that it is lacking somewhat. On the other hand, if you're not receiving any instruction, want an easy read, and have no problem with being spoon-fed code just to see its end result, then look no further.
Sardleem
I am not new development but I try to read books of all levels. Knowing the author of the book I was curious and I like to read intro books like this to help when I mentor developers. I can compare what they know to what is contained in the book. If well written, I suggest the book, and this is a certainly a book I recommend. It lays out the topics I think are required especially in Part II. Was very happy to see Chapter 6 - Building Class Libraries because too often beginner books make it seem as if class libraries are not an entity to themselves but a piece of either win forms or web forms in .NET. I think this will make it much clearer to the novice. The chapter on debugging distilled the info to a good level to make someone effective instead of overloading with everything Visual Studio can do. Part III covered specific topics that I would not want to explain on my own. The information is readable and not over done. Part IV goes on to pickup some topics I would not have thought to include. Not every new developer will need to read these, but having these simple examples to refer to will be especially helpful to someone who is new to .NET but with some background in Visual Basic. Part V along with all the tips in the books, and the cheat sheets make this book even more valuable. If you are on the fence about this book, pick it up off the shelf at a local book store to get a feel for Bill's writing style. I think the conversational feel of the text makes it much nicer than the other books of the same technical depth on the topic.
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