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eBook The Five Biggest Ideas in Science (Wiley Popular Science) epub

by Charles M. Wynn

eBook The Five Biggest Ideas in Science (Wiley Popular Science) epub
  • ISBN: 0471138126
  • Author: Charles M. Wynn
  • Genre: Teens
  • Subcategory: Education & Reference
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (December 1, 1996)
  • Pages: 208 pages
  • ePUB size: 1964 kb
  • FB2 size 1266 kb
  • Formats docx lrf lit mbr


Start by marking The Five Biggest Ideas in Science (Wiley Popular Science) as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Five Biggest Ideas in Science (Wiley Popular Science) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of the questions scientists seek to answer about the natural world: Do basic building blocks of matter exist, and if so, what do they look like?

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Featuring humorous illustrations from renowned science cartoonist Sidney Harris, this book invites you to explore the events that led to these problems and the cutting-edge efforts being made to solve them. The authors also provide Idea Folders, which contain additional details about the unsolved problems, and Resources for Digging Deeper, such as books, periodicals, and Web sites. Paperback: 240 pages.

This book is a GREAT introduction to anyone interested in science, wishing to become better informed about scientific issues . The five "biggest" problems are (from different disciplines and not without controversy): 1. The nature and origin of mass.

This book is a GREAT introduction to anyone interested in science, wishing to become better informed about scientific issues, or wanting to know what many of our best scientists are working on right now. It is not particularly deep and is therefore a good primer for the non-scientifically oriented reader. Why do some particles have mass while others do not?)

For earth science, plate tectonics. And for biology, evolution. Includes a chapter on risk/benefit analysis with examples of how scientific ideas and methods are use in real life.

For earth science, plate tectonics. After explaining the basics, the authors give a simple overview of how these theories relate to each other to convey a complete picture of todays world. Pages: 212. ISBN 13: 978-0471138129. Series: Wiley Popular Science.

In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a. .Publisher: Wiley & Sons Canada, Limited, John.

In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of th.

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Wiley Popular Science). In easy-to-understand terms, the book introduces novices to the basics of current theory by exploring the five major scientific disciplines and the fundamental theory behind each. Charles M. Wynn 1996 ISBN: 0471138126 English 208 pages PDF 20,2 MB. For physics, it's the model of the atom. For chemistry, the periodic law. For astronomy, the big bang. For earth science, plate tectonics. And for biology, evolution

Ideas in Science Charles M. Wynn, Arthur W. Wiggins 1996 Wiley

The Five Biggest Ideas in Science Charles M. Wiggins 1996 Wiley. In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of the questions scientists seek to answer about the natural world: QUESTION 1) Do basic building blocks of matter exist, and if so, what do they look like? BIG IDEA 1) Physics' Model of the Atom

Published 1997 by Wiley in New York.

The five biggest ideas in science. Are you sure you want to remove The five biggest ideas in science from your list? The five biggest ideas in science. Published 1997 by Wiley in New York. Science, In library, Miscellanea. Presents five basic scientific hypotheses: the atomic model, the periodic law, the big bang theory, plate tectonics, and evolution. Includes bibliographical references (p. 185-188) and index.

In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of the questions . Books related to The Five Biggest Ideas in Science.

In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of the questions scientists seek to answer about the natural world: Do basic building blocks of matter exist, and if so, what do they look like? BIG IDEA Physics' Model of the Atom What relationships, if any, exist among different kinds of atoms? BIG IDEA Chemistry's Periodic Law Where did the atoms of the universe come from,and what is their destiny? .

In a thought-provoking and entertaining exploration of The Five Biggest Ideas in Science, authors Charles Wynn and Arthur Wiggins provide a panoramic view of the questions scientists seek to answer about the natural world:* Do basic building blocks of matter exist, and if so, what do they look like?* BIG IDEA #1: Physics' Model of the Atom* What relationships, if any, exist among different kinds of atoms?* BIG IDEA #2: Chemistry's Periodic Law* Where did the atoms of the universe come from,and what is their destiny?* BIG IDEA #3: Astronomy's Big Bang Theory* How is the matter of the universe arranged in planet Earth?* BIG IDEA #4: Geology's Plate Tectonics Model* How did life on planet Earth originate and develop?* BIG IDEA #5: Biology's Theory of EvolutionGet set for a lively and informative discussion, as you also learn how to evaluate potential applications of these and other scientific ideas.
Comments: (7)
Charyoll
This book is a GREAT introduction to anyone interested in science, wishing to become better informed about scientific issues, or wanting to know what many of our best scientists are working on right now. It is not particularly deep and is therefore a good primer for the non-scientifically oriented reader.

The authors open with a careful discussion of the scientific process. Most of us make our daily life decisions on the basis of tradition, word of mouth, and limited anecdotal experience - and refer more important decisions to a professional. How enlightening it is to be reminded of the rigorous testing, the meticulous standards and procedures, the relentless re-examination in the face of new data, and the necessary grilling by peers that is part of the day to day activity of scientists. Science uses a different language from that used in everyday speech - that language being mathematics. "Because mathematical skills require a great deal of effort to acquire, explaining scientific hypotheses to people not trained in mathematics requires translation of mathematical concepts into conversational language. Unfortunately, the meaning of the hypothesis may suffer in the process."

The five unsolved problems are then discussed, one each from the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. Then 27 more are asked in an "appendix" type chapter and given only half-page answers. I like these sorts of books because they help me to maintain general scientific literacy.

For every bit of knowledge we gain, new questions invariably arise - that never-ending quest being the nature of science. I personally think we'll still be looking for the TOE (Theory of Everything) in 100 years, but reading about unsolved problems will notify me if string theory is abandoned, if parallel universes are found, or if the complete structure and function of the proteome is ascertained (fat chance). I might add that the running cartoon commentary by Sidney Harris is superb!
Kea
This is like a condensed survey course of various facets of Science. The authors cut to the chase by focusing on one major unsolved problem in each discipline. Their breadth of knowledge is impressive and their presentations are comprehensible for laymen like me. I was particularly attracted to the question "How was the first living thing formed?" and also "Why is the universe expanding faster and faster?". The accompanying cartoons are well done. The ideas folder at the end touches on many current news topics like greenhouse gases and genetic engineering. An interesting read for those who wonder "Why?".
Friert
Purchased used for my daughters college course. Item arived quickly and as described. Love Amazon used textbooks as they save me huge $$. Pay attention to the descriptions if you need the CD that are packaged with new books as they are not always included when ordering used copies. Amazon order history makes figuring tax deductions easy if you loose the receipt/packing slips.
Billy Granson
great read youth
Vit
If youre buying for a college elective course, you dont need it. Just borrow someones to read that chapter. Theres only 5or6 chapters and theyre only like 10 pages each. Not worth buying..
Nalaylewe
Great Job
Bort
This is written by two guys who teach physics (Wiggins) and chemistry (Wynn) at the college level in a reader-friendly manner in which each of the five unsolved problems are presented, explained, and critiqued. Each section is then concluded with indications of how these problems might be solved. There are some nice cartoons by Sidney Harris to augment the text.

The five "biggest" problems are (from different disciplines and not without controversy):

1. The nature and origin of mass. (Why do some particles have mass while others do not?)

It is obvious that we really do not understand the nature of mass from our inability to form a unified theory involving gravity, a theory that would unify quantum mechanics and relativity. Indeed I think physicists are just whistling in the dark when they talk about particles and fields. It's clear to even this casual observer that the real nature of particles/waves, particles/fields is not really understood, and perhaps cannot be understood in anything other than a once or twice removed mathematical sense. We can write equations that describe what we observe, but the intrinsic nature of all phenomena remains veiled. We avoid infinities in the mathematics of physics as a long-observed and much beloved rule (something like Occam's Razor) with the result that we (necessarily) "construct" limits on the physical world like those named after Max Planck. Beyond (or "below," or "under" or "smaller than," etc.) those limits is potentially a whole universe of physics much like what might be beyond the Big Bang in cosmology.

Authors Wiggins and Wynn acknowledge that the Standard Model of physics has a "dark side" (p. 30) and that the long-sought Higgs field particle may be a "mathematic convenience." (p. 31) From my point of view everything in physics (and this includes all of string theory) that has not met with experimental proof is possibly a "mathematical convenience." This is not to denigrate physics or physicists. On the contrary. What physicists have accomplished toward an understanding of the world in which we live stands as one of humankind's most glorious achievements. The problem is that (as quoted from J.B.S. Haldane on page 159) "the universe is not only queerer than we suppose, but queerer than we can suppose." In other words don't hold your breath for the dreamed-of "Theory of Everything." And if it arrives, don't imagine that "everything" really is "everything."

2. How did lifeless chemical reactions become life?

The authors present some of the history (Stanley Miller's primordial soup experiment; panspermia, etc.), outline the problems, tell us a little about DNA and RNA, and finish with how the puzzle might be solved and by whom. I would observe that imbedded within this question is a theoretical bugaboo that first needs to be resolved. We have to agreeably define what "life" is before we can hope to make a distinction between very complex but "lifeless" self-replicating molecules and molecules forming living organisms. As such, the problem is one of definition as much as anything else. Clearly if we left out our notion of things living as opposed to things not living, we might discover a step-by-step continuum without a clear demarcation point.

3. How do proteins control cells and tissues? ("What is the complete structure and function of the proteome?")

The authors note that since the genome has been mapped and sequenced, "the unsolved problem" in biology "has shifted" to "How do protein molecules built from directions provided by [the]...genomes contribute to the structure and function of organisms?" (p. 71) A very complex problem indeed, but at least it is a practical problem and not a theoretical one, and as such (unlike some others in this book) is one that conceivably can be solved through a whole lot of hard work.

This is about cells and how they function. The authors reprise the genome mapping and sequencing story, and then point to "Protemics: The Next Frontier."

4. Can we predict the weather? (Or, how accurate can our weather predictions be?)

This of course is about complexity theory and why that famous butterfly in the Sahara continues to influence the formation of hurricanes in the Carribean.

Quick answer: accuracy will continue to fall off as the square of the distance in time. Just joking, but clearly the more lengthy the forecast, the more uncertain it will continue to be.

5. Why is the universe expanding faster and faster?

Ah, yes. What IS the nature of Einstein's fudge factor that has recently returned? I love this one. The real question is what IS all that dark energy and dark matter out there? As the authors point out only 4%(!) (see page 129) of all the matter in the universe is accounted for in terms of things seen. Seventy-three percent is in the form of dark energy and another 23% in the form of dark matter. It is amazing to realize that over 90% of what exists is stuff we know next to nothing about!

A nice part of the book are the "folders" at the back in which many other interesting issues are briefly presented. The problems in the "Problem Folder" are organized according to disciplines, "Physics Problems," Chemistry Problems," etc. There are sixteen ideas in the "Ideas Folder," including such things as anti-matter, protein folding, chaos theory, global warming, and so on.

Bottom line: Wiggings and Wynn do a good job of introducing the general reader to what scientists at the horizon are working on. It's really amazing to realize how far we've come as knowledge-seeking creatures, and then to get a glimpse of how incredibly much there is we don't know.
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