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eBook Naughts & Crosses epub

by Malorie Blackman

eBook Naughts & Crosses epub
  • ISBN: 1416900160
  • Author: Malorie Blackman
  • Genre: Teens
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; First U.S. Edition edition (June 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 400 pages
  • ePUB size: 1626 kb
  • FB2 size 1695 kb
  • Formats lit mobi azw rtf


By Malorie Blackman and published by Doubleday/Corgi Books: The Noughts & Crosses sequence.

By Malorie Blackman and published by Doubleday/Corgi Books: The Noughts & Crosses sequence. NOUGHTS & CROSSES. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publishers.

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Naughts & Crosses Hardcover – 31 May 2005. Malorie Blackman (Author). Book 1 of 4 in the Noughts And Crosses Series. by.

In a world where the pale-skinned Naughts are discriminated against by the politically and socially powerful dark-skinned Crosses, teenagers Callum-a Naught-and Sephy-a Cross-test whether their love is strong enough to survive their society's racism.

Why Malorie Blackman isn’t the name on everyone’s lips, I don’t know Given the choice between rereading Naughts and Crosses again and having someone slowly puncture my right eye with a rusty icepick, I would gladly take the rusty icepick.

Why Malorie Blackman isn’t the name on everyone’s lips, I don’t know. Read this book and then come and talk to me. You bring the gin and I’ll bring the sun cream. Given the choice between rereading Naughts and Crosses again and having someone slowly puncture my right eye with a rusty icepick, I would gladly take the rusty icepick. World-building at its worst, that's Naughts and Crosses. I could not engage in the narrative, I despised the narrators because they bored me, and the narrative voice would have been more effective as a third-person omniscient.

Best Answer: Which book, i've read all four, but after time they kind of merge into one! Hmmm, i think you are talkign about the first one? .

Best Answer: Which book, i've read all four, but after time they kind of merge into one! Hmmm, i think you are talkign about the first one? The one callum is like involved in? . Anyone else read Naughts nad Crosses by malorie blackman? In the series naughts &crosses by malorie blackman, what is the first book in the series? like whats the title. Who is your Dream Cast for the novel Naughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman if there we to ever be a movie? More questions. How would you describe Malorie Blackman's writing in her Naughts & Crosses series? Have any Americans read books by Malorie Blackman? Answer Questions.

Callum is a naught, a second-class citizen in a society run by the ruling Crosses  .

Sephy is a Cross, and daughter of the man slated to become prime minister. Naughts & Crosses - Malorie Blackman. In their world, white naughts and black Crosses simply don't mix - and they certainly don't fall in love. But that's exactly what they've done. When they were younger, they played together. Sephy is a Cross, and daughter of the man slated to become prime minister. Two young people are forced to make a stand in this thought-provoking look at racism and prejudice in an alternate society. Sephy is a Cross - a member of the dark-skinned ruling class. Callum is a Nought - a colourless member of the underclass who were once slaves to the Crosses.

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Comments: (7)
Walan
While not a work of historical fiction, Malorie Blackman’s first book in a dark series (currently spanning four novels) sheds light on numerous, many times ugly, truths of past and present, as well as universal human nature. Her ability to tackle some of the bleakest topics of western history in a present day setting, with roles being completely reversed, is to be applauded. An effort to delve this deep into issues of racism, slavery, and segregation while performing a 180 on the historical record is unprecedented.
Black & White
By Malorie Blackman
Whites enslaved blacks. Whites kidnapped blacks from their homes in Africa, took them far from home, family, and familiarity, and forced them to work without pay under the harshest of conditions. Blacks were eventually freed. Whites still viewed them as inferior. Years of segregation and unequal rights prevailed. Now all men (and women) are created equal, at least in the court of law. Prejudice and racism still persist, although on an individual rather than an institutionalized scale. This is where we are currently in history. These are the facts. Facts that we often don’t like to acknowledge.
When a novel addresses these facts, these issues of segregation and racism, and is written by a white author, it is often viewed in an apologetic sense. When a novel addresses issues of segregation and racism, and is written by a black author, it is often viewed as an ode to injustice, a rehashing of issues that have been ‘hashed’ quite enough. Malorie Blackman has broken down all boundaries and crossed all borders in her novel Black & White. Blackman’s novel, originally published in Britain as Naughts & Crosses, has turned history upside down. She has made it possible to cover the cruelest of offenses in a way that does not demonize a particular race, but rather shows the universality of the dark side of humanity. In Blackman’s novel, the Crosses are the ruling class, are “closest to God,” and are black. The Naughts, on the other hand, are white and despised. The Naughts have been free for years, but segregation and deeply ingrained racism and hatred are running rampant in an increasingly unstable society.
Blackman’s use of the black man as the oppressor, and the fact that she herself is black, opens up doors closed to authors who follow the historical record more closely. This is a dark novel, which touches on love and the value of life, but also features suicide, alcoholism, unplanned pregnancy, political terrorism, execution, domestic violence, adultery, and above all HATE. Book censors will be pleased (or perhaps disappointed) that the fictional terms Naughts and Crosses, and fictional racial slurs, blankers and daggers, cannot be found particularly offensive due to their fictitious status. Readers will be more than aware that blanker is an equivalent to the n-word, only in reference to whites, but since it is not an actual word, and carries no historical baggage, Blackman can print it as many times as she wishes without critics breathing down her neck.
Published as a YA novel, Black & White, is perhaps most appropriate for mature readers age 16 and up. There is no one scene that is particularly heinous that would make this novel “more mature” than other novels that touch on similar themes; it is instead the culmination of one despairing event after another that makes this novel not for the faint of heart.
Somehow Blackman manages to center this novel, covering a plethora of controversial themes, around the friendship and ultimate love story of Sephy and Callum, a Cross girl and a Naught boy. Readers will not be led to a happily ever after, which only serves to strengthen the believability of the story and fictitious society as a whole.
Although unpleasant, readers will be drawn into Blackman’s imagined society and will likely rush straight into Knife Edge, the next installment in the Naughts & Crosses series. Many ends are left loose at the conclusion of Black & White, leaving readers no choice but to purchase the next book if they want to know what happens next in the lives of Sephy and all the other characters that have been introduced (and there are a lot of them). The main weakness of Black & White is the overwhelming number of characters. There are too many characters being portrayed as multifaceted, as gray instead of black or white, for the reader to be able to truly care for or follow all of their stories. In real life, surely most people are gray, but in literature sometimes it helps to have the dependable bad or good character(s).
Black & White will literally jump off of library shelves as soon as word gets out. Teen girls cannot resist a tale of star-crossed lovers, and there is enough action, violence, and suspense for even the most skeptical of boys. All libraries would do well to purchase this original work by Malorie Blackman, as well as the remainder of the series, for this much insight into the human condition is rarely found in one well written novel.
Lemana
This book took me back to the 1950's and 60's, a time when segregation was being fought by the likes of Rosa Parks, Martin Lurther King Jr., to name a few. I wasn't alive back then, but we have all seen the images of the 4 or 5 black students walking into a all white high school for the first time. I could only imagine what it would of been like to of been one of those students walking up those steps.

This book is about a world where the crosses(blacks) are the first class citizens and the Naughts(whites) are second class. The author has taken history and flipped it on its head. Malorie Blackman did an amazing job bringing this world together, almost to well.

The story focuses on two main characters, Stephy a Cross, and Callum a Naught. The two are childhood friends, by way of Callum's mom being employed by Stephy's parents. The book follows how they manage their forbidden relationship in a world of pressured segregation. See, the Crosses are not to mingle with the Naughts and vice versa.

The prose was simple and flowed beautifully. I read this book in a day, I just couldn't put it down. This is the first book I have read that is narrated by the two main characters. Malorie Blackman did a wonderful job flowing one voice into the other. I was never confused on who was talking.

Warning, if you are looking for a happy ever after, this is not your book. The story is sad and tragic, but also beautiful and heartfelt. I cried several times throughout the book and ugly cried at the end. I loved this story and it has earned a place in my top favorite books of all time.
I ℓ٥ﻻ ﻉ√٥υ
I gave this book 5 stars because I started reading it, thinking I would see a different dynamic in the world if the Europeans had not taken part in imperialism. Needless to say there was no difference sociologically, there was inequality rampant. This book showed how prejudiced mind sets all combine to ultimately (and inevitably) make a racist society. We can directly apply this to real life, and I hope readers of privileged groups could see why the naughts were all antagonistic towards Sephy. She wasn't the direct source of prejudice, but she was one who did not have to feel the harmful effects of being "lesser".

I do feel like the last 100 pages of the book were a little rushed, but I liked how Callum and Sephy changed over the years. I also wished the author described the physical difference between the naughts and crosses to show how that happens everyday in real life inconspicuously.
Rose Of Winds
This was a great book. I loved the characters. I couldn't believe the end, really?! With the way it ended, I don't think know if I will be able to get into the second book. This is the reason for the 4 star, and not a five. I bought the second book, and just don't feel the same about it. I will give it another try again in the future. Who knows, maybe I will like it?
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