» » The Midnight Charter (Agora Trilogy)

eBook The Midnight Charter (Agora Trilogy) epub

by David Whitley

eBook The Midnight Charter (Agora Trilogy) epub
  • ISBN: 1596433817
  • Author: David Whitley
  • Genre: Teens
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Roaring Brook Press; 1 edition (September 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 336 pages
  • ePUB size: 1647 kb
  • FB2 size 1138 kb
  • Formats docx lrf rtf mbr


The Midnight Charter book. With the Midnight Charter, David Whitley has created an unexpected and beautiful tale of friendship, love, forgiveness and reconciliation

The Midnight Charter book. With the Midnight Charter, David Whitley has created an unexpected and beautiful tale of friendship, love, forgiveness and reconciliation. It has a powerful message, something I really had not expected before starting the Midnight Charter. Reading the blurb, it just sounds like a mediocre fantasy, and I cannot emphasise enough how untrue this is.

The Midnight Charter The Agora Trilogy: Book 1 . In the city of Agora, anything can be bought and sold. David Whitley was born in 1984 and graduated from the University of Oxford with a double First in English Literature and a passion for writing children's fiction

The Midnight Charter The Agora Trilogy: Book 1 . Even children are possessions until their twelfth birthday The Children of the Lost The Agora Trilogy: Book 2 . Mark and Lily have been banished from Agora, the ancient city-state where everything is for sale – memories, emotions – even children. David Whitley was born in 1984 and graduated from the University of Oxford with a double First in English Literature and a passion for writing children's fiction More about David Whitley.

David Whitley (born 1984) is a British writer, author of the young adult/teen fantasy The Midnight Charter and two subsequent books in the Agora Trilogy. The Midnight Charter was published in August 2009 and was Whitley's debut novel. Whitley was born in Chester in the North West of England, where he was a pupil at The King's School. At the age of 17, he entered his first novel for the Kathleen Fiddler Award and was shortlisted.

The Midnight Charter is a young adult fantasy novel by David Whitley. It is the first novel in the Agora Trilogy, and the author's debut novel. It was nominated for the 2010 Carnegie Medal, but lost to Neil Gaiman's The Graveyard Book. Anything can be bought and sold - including thoughts, ideas, emotions and ultimately people

Электронная книга "The Midnight Charter", David Whitley.

Электронная книга "The Midnight Charter", David Whitley. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Midnight Charter" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

David Whitley was born in 1984 and graduated from the University of Oxford with a degree in English Literature and a passion for writing children’s fiction

David Whitley was born in 1984 and graduated from the University of Oxford with a degree in English Literature and a passion for writing children’s fiction. At age 17 his first children’s novel was shortlisted for the Kathleen Fidler Award, and at 20 he won the Cheshire Prize for Literature for a children’s short story, the youngest writer ever to win this prestigious award.

Publishers Weekly on THE MIDNIGHT CHARTER

Publishers Weekly on THE MIDNIGHT CHARTER. Whitley threads together a thrilling page-turner with the two heroes' lives intertwining in surprising and illuminating ways. Shelf Awareness on THE MIDNIGHT CHARTER. It explores tantalizing new territory and solidifies the Agora Trilogy as one of the more literarily ambitious and complex fantasies going. Booklist on THE CHILDREN OF THE LOST. Poetic writing, a genuine friendship, taut plotting.

Book in the The Agora Trilogy Series).

The Midnight Charter. Book in the The Agora Trilogy Series).

Books related to The Midnight Charter.

series The Agora Trilogy Audiobook. THE MIDNIGHT CHARTER combines great storytelling with a compelling vision - a many layered adventure with powerful and timely implications. Books related to The Midnight Charter. by. Whitley, David, 1984-. In the tower of Count Stelli in the ancient city-state of Agora, two children meet, apparently by chance. Mark has escaped the plague ravaging the city's slums. Lily is the servant who cares for him. At first, their only goal is survival: In Agora, everything can be bought and sold, debt is death, and Mark and Lily must barter their labor for their lives.

In a society based on trade, where everything can be bought and sold, the future rests on the secrets of a single document-and the lives of two children whose destiny it is to discover its secrets. In this spellbinding novel, newcomer David Whitley has imagined a nation at a crossroads: misshaped by materialism and facing a choice about its future. He has brought to life two children who will test the nation's values-and crafted a spellbinding adventure story that will keep readers turning the pages until the very end. For readers who love Philip Pullman, THE MIDNIGHT CHARTER combines great storytelling with a compelling vision - a many layered adventure with powerful and timely implications.
Comments: (7)
POFOD
This book apparently is meant to be an allegory-lite tale of the downside of unrestricted free markets. In order to drive the point home the Agora is based on an old-fashioned view of contract, (offer, acceptance, consideration, obsession with formality) that hasn't been been operative law in Western economies since the 1940's. In order to add immediacy and drama there are also debtor prisons, debt collectors, and ruthless enforcement officers. Private and public charity are set up as antithetical to this system, although there is no compelling reason why this has to be so, except to set up the dramatic tension in the book.

All of that would be fine if this were otherwise a good book. "Animal Farm" has a similarly loaded deck. So does "Fahrenheit 451". Heck, so does "Blade Runner". So the real question is how this works as a novel. (And, is it better than the real, substantial anti-corporate novels of the 40's and 50's like "What Makes Sammy Run" or "The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit" or "I Can Get It For You Wholesale"?)

Well, don't be fooled by the first chapter, which is very well written and which captures the reader's attention. Once the scene and the characters have been set up at the outset, nothing much else happens to develop the story or the characters, as opposed to the writer's message. All of the characters just roll on as types to illustrate the author's points.

Things get pretty random pretty fast. The hero is an astrologer, which is an odd choice for a captain of marketing and industry. Some folderol about selling bodily essences, (which I guess is a heavy-handed metaphor), moves some sup-plots forward. We get secret societies, mystical prophetic contracts, pointless violence and cartoonish plots and political intrigue. All of this is bulked out to over 300 pages, with sequels to follow. Putting a fantasy-quest layer over all of this doesn't help it cohere.

I have no idea who this book could be for. It's too sketchy, shallow and obvious to hold an adult or advanced reader's interest, and too dense and dry to appeal very much to a younger reader. Breathless blurbs and bits and pieces of a less-than-compelling mystery aren't going to save it.
Bodwyn
I received this book as a Christmas present. I then got the Kindle edition a month later. I am now in the process of reading it a second time The book shows a lot about the human spirit. As Americans we can learn a lot. To do things that are not required, to help someone even if we get no payment in return.
Kriau
I have a hard time leaving a book I have started reading unfinished. Even when I hate the book, I usually still find myself wanting to know what happened. That being said, there were many times when I considered putting this book down.

The story follows Lily and Mark as they go from orphaned servants to important members of Agoran society. Lily has been an orphan her entire life and was sold by her orphange to work. She comes to work as an astrologer's servant, where she comes to meet Mark, a boy who grew up in the slums and was sold by his father to the astrologer's son--Dr. Theopilis when they had both contracted a plague that was sweeping the poor in the city. Agora is a city where everything is about contracts, ownership, and sales. Even emotions can be extracted from a person and sold. Events conspire to lead the pair of friends of opposite paths--Lily works to help the poor of the city while Mark becomes rich and influential. But something bigger is at stake--Lily and Mark are part of a mysterious prophecy meant to determine the future of the city itself.

It feels like we are missing steps throughout the story. We jump from point A to point D to point G, etc. So much time elapses from one chapter to the next that we are always being given summary of the time we missed. As a result, we can't get involved in the story and just settle into it. It also makes the development of the characters and story feel forced and unrealistic because we didn't get to see it happen.

The message of the story, about the need for charity, the importance of human life, and how money can corrupt, feels a little preachy instead of natural. I would have liked it to be slightly more subtle. (Perhaps without Lily literally spelling it out at one point...)

Ultimately, I couldn't get into the story and have major issues with the way it ended. It simply didn't seem to make sense logically [Spoiler]: How can they change the city if they cannot return to it?
eBooks Related to The Midnight Charter (Agora Trilogy)
Contacts | Privacy Policy | DMCA
All rights reserved.
lycee-pablo-picasso.fr © 2016-2020