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eBook Huntress epub

by Malinda Lo

eBook Huntress epub
  • ISBN: 1907411097
  • Author: Malinda Lo
  • Genre: Teens
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Atom; Digital original edition (2011)
  • Pages: 384 pages
  • ePUB size: 1255 kb
  • FB2 size 1864 kb
  • Formats lrf lrf mobi rtf


Huntress is a slow burn book that will certainly leave its readers breathless. Highly recommended to fantasy fans. Huntress is a prequel to Malinda Lo’s debut novel, Ash, though the two books can stand independently

Huntress is a slow burn book that will certainly leave its readers breathless. Huntress is a prequel to Malinda Lo’s debut novel, Ash, though the two books can stand independently. Huntress takes place several centuries earlier, in a time when the country’s culture was more analogous to that of feudal China. In the past few years, a shift in the weather has resulted in famine.

Huntress is a low stress, fairly simple young adult book about two girls who go on a quest to save their kingdom and happen to fall in love with each other along the way. The book starts with Taisin, a seventeen year old training to be a sage, having a vision. She sees herself watching a girl she loves deeply row away to what’s probably her death.

Malinda lo. Little, brown and company. Huntress is set in the same world as Ash, but it takes place many centuries earlier. There are some significant cultural differences between the time periods. In multisyllabic names, the emphasis is on the italicized syllable. In some cases, both syllables should be given equal weight. In human names, the letters ae are pronounced like the a sound in mate and skate; the letters ai are pronounced like the i sound in kite and site.

Malinda Lo was born in China and moved to the United States as a child. Huntress is a low stress, fairly simple young adult book about two girls who go on a quest to save their kingdom and happen to fall in love with each other along the way. She grew up in Colorado and has since lived in Boston, New York, London, Beijing, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and has master's degrees from Harvard and Stanford Universities. They pulled out their oilskin cloaks, but as the day wore on with no sign that it would let up, Kaede began to feel the wet weight of it like a burden on her back. They pulled out their oilskin cloaks, but as the day wore on with no sign that it would let up, Kaede began to feel the wet weight of it like a burden on her back n them off with as much good cheer as they could muster, but it was obvious they had a difficult time fighting their fear that Shae would never return. Niran had convinced Tali that their wagon would never make it through the narrow trails carved into the Wood, and he traded them two sturdy packhorses for the wagon itself

Malinda Lo’s Huntress is a familiar and satisfying adventure story nestled within a truly diverse and nuanced fantasy world. There is a long journey through a magical Wood, a brave prince, an ice fortress, a pack of fairy huntsmen, and strength derived from the power of true love.

Malinda Lo’s Huntress is a familiar and satisfying adventure story nestled within a truly diverse and nuanced fantasy world. The way these tropes are pushed and pulled in unexpected directions presents a story that is enjoyable, fresh and compelling.

The exciting adventure prequel to Malinda Lo's highly acclaimed novel Ash is overflowing with lush Chinese influences and details inspired by the I Ching, and is filled with action and romance.

Nature is out of balance in the human world. The sun hasn't shone in years, and crops are failing  . The exciting adventure prequel to Malinda Lo's highly acclaimed novel Ash is overflowing with lush Chinese influences and details inspired by the I Ching, and is filled with action and romance.

Author: Malinda Lo. Genre: Fantasy, YA. Publisher: Little, Brown (US)/ Atom (UK) Publication date: April 5, May 5 Hardcover/ Paperback: 384 pages. Nature is out of balance in the human world. The sun hasn’t shone in years, and crops are failing.

The sun hasn't shone in years, and crops are failing.

Nature is out of balance in the human world. The sun hasn't shone in years, and crops are failing. Worse yet, strange and hostile creatures have begun to appear. The people's survival hangs in the balance. To solve the crisis, the oracle stones are cast, and Kaede and Taisin are picked to go on a dangerous and unheard-of journey to Tanlili, the city of the Fairy Queen. Taisin is a sage, thrumming with magic, and Kaede is of the earth, without a speck of the otherworldly. And yet their two destinies are drawn together during the mission. As members of their party succumb to unearthly attacks and fairy tricks, the two come to rely on each other and even begin to fall in love. But the Kingdom needs only one huntress to save it, and what it takes could tear Kaede and Taisin apart forever...
Comments: (7)
Trex
Huntress is a low stress, fairly simple young adult book about two girls who go on a quest to save their kingdom and happen to fall in love with each other along the way.

The book starts with Taisin, a seventeen year old training to be a sage, having a vision. She sees herself watching a girl she loves deeply row away to what’s probably her death. Taisin’s vision is proven to be crucial to a journey to visit the Fairy Queen, a visit that’s hoped to save the kingdom from starvation and the strange and dangerous creatures that have started to appear along the border. Taisin, Kaede, the king’s son, and three guards are thus packed off on this dangerous quest.

Huntress has both its good points and bad points, but I’ll start with the good points. For one, I liked the atmosphere of the world. Lo was able to communicate well the threat the kingdom was under, the coldness, the perpetually grey sky… the Great Woods really evoked a sense of darkness and malevolence. I also liked how the magic was set up and tied into the world.

I liked the major characters all right, even if they never really came alive to me. Taisin, Kaede, and Con (the prince) all had basic personalities and were at least distinguishable from one another.

Huntress also benefits from being something different than the normal YA fantasy fare – how many books are there in an Asian based setting where the two female protagonists fall in love? I also liked how the drama between Taisin and Kaede wasn’t because they were both girls. The world Lo’s created doesn’t seem to have any homophobia, and the drama’s instead due to Taisin wanting to become a sage, which means taking a vow of chastity.

Also, Con wasn’t in unrequited love with one of the lesbian protagonists. So kudos for that.

For the bad points… Huntress has third person omniscient POV that shifts around constantly. I actually didn’t find it annoying in here as I have in other books.

As a result of the vision that Taisin has in the beginning, there’s a sort of paradoxical instalove. Taisin has feelings for Kaede before she even knows Kaede. At least on Kaede’s part things were more gradual.

The villain was incredibly weak and underdeveloped. Plus, there was a long monologue near the end. Urgh.

Speaking of the end, the climatic Grand Confrontation felt very brief. It needed more depth and time spent on it. Most of the book was spent on characters traveling to the climatic Grand Confrontation, which also was pretty vague and mystical – sort of like what Robin McKinley writes for her confrontation scenes.

This next paragraph is vague but might be considered spoilers, so read at your own risk. I wasn’t happy with the ending. I get that it was realistic in the the future is uncertain, I think. A choice may have been made at the end, but the character’s decision was not explained, which leaves me confused to as if there even was a decision. I also feel like the idea of a possible third choice was being set up, but it was not explored. Overall, I would have liked the ending to be more wrapped up.

I would recommend this to people looking for a romance subplot between two girls, non-white characters, or girls going on an adventure.
Jan
I actually enjoyed this read more than I expected. I don't know why, but I've been procrastinating on reading both Huntress and Ash. After reading Zoe Reed's breaking legacies, I felt I would never love another lesbian fantasy novel. And I'm starting to think I'm right. Even though I loved the plot and world Malinda Lo created, when I hit the last sentence and the acknowledgements one thought came to mind: Are you kidding me? It's not so much the ending. Other people might find the ending really endearing, a part of me does. But the relationship between Kaede and Taisin is left open. Don't get me wrong, it's very admirable that their love is so strong. But at the same time, we need more lesbian fantasy novels where they actually end up together. We need more lesbian fantasy novels period.
Other than that, I liked it. There were parts that were slow and a little too descriptive, but all in all a good book.
Kiutondyl
This is the prequel to Ash, which I have shorthanded as "the bisexual Cinderella story". My mental title for this book was "Ask More Questions".

We have two viewpoint characters: Taisin, a farmgirl with magical talent, and Kaede, a nobleman's daughter fighting against her conventional marriage-of-convenience fate because she is not attracted to men and because she wants to decide her own destiny.

They set off on a journey to meet the Queen of the Fairies and try to save their world from an endless killing winter. The quest narrative rolls on, but there are some unexpected turns. They lose members of their party. Kaede, in particular, has to come to terms with her calling to kill fae. She is a reluctant killer, and it bothers her, but I think the book could have benefited from Kaede deciding whether she was going to be used for other people's purposes, or because she is making reasoned decisions. She seems unduly trusting of the Fairy Queen's word about what's going on in the world. She never seems to want confirmation that the people she is sent after need to be killed.

There is a sweet star-crossed lovers romance, and I applaud Lo for not going with some lazy love-conquers-all ending. There are more complications than that, even though both women acknowledge they love each other. They are not having problems because of some contrived miscommunication, they have real and legitimate conflicting interests. I like how they appear to be resolving it.

In the end, Kaede goes on a quest with the Queen's Huntsman. I wanted to know more about the Huntsman, and how he came to love the queen, and what he thinks of his job. One of the problems with YA is that there is not usually room in the books for three extra chapters to develop a minor character.

I thought about Robin McKinley while I was reading this book. I thought it shared some common flavors, while going in a different direction. I think if McKinley had written it, there would have been only one viewpoint character. I don't know if that would make it less rich or more direct.

There is a lot of room in this story for us to write our own outcomes, and the world, although lightly sketched, is a place that seems easy to populate. I like books that don't answer all the questions.

The world is a tiny bit asian-flavored, instead of being vaguely medieval-european. They cook rice while traveling, and the important mythical animals are phoenixes and unicorns, not lions and dragons.

A special note on the cover: As opposed to Ash, which had a very vulnerable-looking girl on the cover, the cover for Huntress delights me. It is fierce, direct, strong. I assume it's Kaede, and she looks ready to take on all comers.

Read if: You like a good quest story. You are tired of relentlessly heteronormative stories. You enjoy watching people play with fairy tale tropes like Legos.

Skip if: You like your protagonists wary. You like your endings tidy. You are looking for an in-depth interrogation of fairy.
Blackredeemer
Huntress is a solid YA fantasy with the added interest of a lesbian relationship between the two main characters. I always appreciate encountering diversity in the books I read, so this element was a big plus. I feel it was handled well. Overall, the first 2/3 of the book were quite strong and compelling. Unfortunately the final 1/3 fell flat, for me. My pet peeves of phrase repetitions, passive voice, and head hopping seemed to become more frustrating as the story line faltered. Nevertheless, the better aspects of this novel (unique relationships, detailed world-building, and strong female characters) earn it four stars.
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