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eBook Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War epub

by Clive Barker

eBook Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War epub
  • ISBN: 0060596384
  • Author: Clive Barker
  • Genre: Teens
  • Subcategory: Literature & Fiction
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (September 26, 2006)
  • Pages: 576 pages
  • ePUB size: 1703 kb
  • FB2 size 1370 kb
  • Formats docx lrf lrf rtf


Days of magic, Nights of war. Dedication. Chapter 2 - The Council Speaks Its Minds. Praise for - Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War.

Days of magic, Nights of war. Back-Ad. Also by Clive Barker.

Then there is Clive Barker's Abarat. Based upon the speed that Clive Barker has been releasing these books, it will probably take Clive till fall of 2009 to deliver the final volume

Then there is Clive Barker's Abarat. With the popularity of Harry Potter, a number of "adult" writers took their shot at writing for a younger audience with mixed success. Based upon the speed that Clive Barker has been releasing these books, it will probably take Clive till fall of 2009 to deliver the final volume. And that is really a pity, because the story now really gets up to speed.

Clive Barker is the bestselling author of twenty-two books, including the New York Times bestsellers Abarat; Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War; and The Thief of Always. He is also an acclaimed painter, film producer, and director

Clive Barker is the bestselling author of twenty-two books, including the New York Times bestsellers Abarat; Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War; and The Thief of Always. He is also an acclaimed painter, film producer, and director. For twelve years Mr. Barker has been working on a vast array of paintings to illuminate the text of The Books of Abarat, more than one hundred and twenty-five of which can be found within this volume. Mr. Barker lives in California

All things in their time. Barker lives in California

Days of Magic, Nights of War (2004) is the second book in a series of five by author Clive Barker, called The Books of Abarat

Days of Magic, Nights of War (2004) is the second book in a series of five by author Clive Barker, called The Books of Abarat. This volume contains the adventures of Candy Quackenbush an ordinary girl from Minnesota, in the strange fantasy world of Abarat. Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War is followed by, Absolute Midnight, which will be followed by a fourth and fifth book to complete the saga. The book tied with Steve Burt's Oddest Yet for the 2004 Bram Stoker Award for Best Work for Young Readers.

Candy Quackenbush's adventures in the Abarat are getting stranger by the hour

Candy Quackenbush's adventures in the Abarat are getting stranger by the hour. Why has the Lord of Midnight sent his henchman after her? Why can she suddenly speak words of magic? Why is the world familiar? Candy and her companions must solve the mystery of her past before the forces of Night and Day clash and Absolute Midnight descends upon the islands. A final war is about to begin. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Candy Quackenbush's adventures in the Abarat continue as she makes a startling realization as to who she is, and the forces of Night begin plans for wa. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you.

Clive Barker, author of The Thief of Always, delivers an epic battle filled with fantasy and adventure that readers won't want to put down!

All things in their time . . .

Candy Quackenbush's adventures in the Abarat are getting stranger by the hour. Why has the Lord of Midnight sent his henchman after her? Why can she suddenly speak words of magic? Why is this world familiar?

Candy and her companions must solve the mystery of her past before the forces of Night and Day clash and Absolute Midnight descends upon the islands.

A final war is about to begin. . . .

Don't miss this second book in Clive Barker's New York Times bestselling Abarat series. This is the mass market paperback edition.

Comments: (7)
Mitars Riders
i love this series but did not realize this version doesn't include the artwork, which in my opinion is essential to understanding and appreciating the book. as a result, i have not read this volume yet. :/
Hadadel
Now that the Harry Potter saga's come to a conclusion, there may be a little void left for the reader - child or adult - who enjoyed the type of fantasy that J.K. Rowling did so well: complex in plot but simple enough in language to be accessible to younger readers as well. Certainly, the best in the bunch would be The Lord of the Rings (and The Hobbit) by Tolkien, but there are other choices out there, with probably the best of the rest being Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy. Then there is Clive Barker's Abarat.

With the popularity of Harry Potter, a number of "adult" writers took their shot at writing for a younger audience with mixed success. Barker, one of the great horror fantasists around today, was not one of these bandwagon jumpers, having already written one good "juvenile" novel, The Thief of Always, long before anyone knew who Harry Potter was. With Abarat, he starts a series of books with a similar young-and-adult-alike audience in mind.

Abarat uses one of the standard fantasy plot devices involving a youngish girl named Candy Quackenbush who discovers a world beyond her mundane existence, one in which she has a great destiny. For Candy, the mundane world is her life in Chickentown, a dull town with one industry (poultry, of course), where she lives with her family that may not be at a Dursley-level of nastiness, but is nonetheless a rather unpleasant one (due, in large part, to an alcoholic, abusive father).

Candy's life changes when she encounters the master thief, Mischief. It doesn't take long for Candy to realize he's something extraordinary: after all, he has seven other heads at the end of antlers. Mischief is being pursued by another strange creature named Shape, and in the process of helping Mischief escape, Candy is transported to another world called the Abarat. This is a set of twenty-five islands, one for each hour of the day plus a mysterious extra island. This is no mere figure of speech: each island sits in a certain block of time, so the noon island is always in bright sunshine, while others under different states of night, day or twilight.

The ruler of the midnight island, Christopher Carrion, has a sinister agenda that involves bringing night to all the Arabat. His opponent, Rojo Pixler, is no good guy either, but is a relentless capitalist intent on a monopoly on all magic and converting the whole world (and Candy's world, known to the locals as the Hereafter) into his own marketplace. In the middle is Candy who has adventures as she goes from place-to-place as both Carrion and Pixler seek her, aware that she is something special.

Abarat is not a self-contained novel, but the first in a series (which I believe to date has only one other book published). As such, it is hard to judge the novel on its plot, which is obviously incomplete. Barker does do a good job at creating a truly bizarre world, one that at times is almost too bizarre. With humor, drama and danger throughout the book, this is a nice read, even if it not a perfect one. For Harry Potter fans who are looking for something new (but at the same time not just a pale Potter imitation), this is a good choice.
Haralem
Picking up right where the first book left off, Candy Quackenbush continues her travels throughout the wonderfully strange world of Abarat, in search of an explanation of why she arrived there in the first place. Christopher Carrion, the Lord of Midnight, is far from happy with the failing attempts of his henchmen Criss-Cross Man in trying to capture Candy, but decides to give him one final chance. Carrion is convinced that the little girl knows some secret that will destroy his ultimate dream of creating eternal night on the Abarat archipelago. Candy will need the help of Malingo, the geshrat she rescued from the clutches of the evil Wizard Kaspar Wolfswinkel, to fight against the Lord of Midnight's evil freaks.

Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War is the long awaited second volume of the Abarat Quintet (originally it was planned to become a quartet, but Clive felt that the story needed some more depth and will add an extra volume). Based upon the speed that Clive Barker has been releasing these books, it will probably take Clive till fall of 2009 to deliver the final volume. And that is really a pity, because the story now really gets up to speed. Compared to the first book, which missed quite some action because it had to introduce the world of Abarat, this episode is a thrilling rollercoaster ride. Quite some colorful characters of the first book do make their reappearance, like the fascinating Wolfswinkel and the three witches Diamanda, Mespa and Jeophi. But this time all the pieces start falling into place. Candy will discover aspects of herself that she would have never have guessed she possessed. Even Chickentown, Minnesota will undergo some remarkable transformations.

Abarat is clearly going to turn out to become the Magnus Opus of Clive's career and although it is officially categorized as a children's book this should stop no-one from entering the amazing world of Abarat.
Kigabar
_There isn't too much more that I can add to this review that I didn't say in my review of the first volume of Abarat. That is because the magic continues undiluted in this volume. This is literally a dream between two covers. So much of what was introduced with promise in Book One is more fully expanded here. I just can't get over the vividness of the images presented in both prose and illustration. This is a book that will literally make you dream in color....

_Just in case you aren't familiar with the story so far, this is the tale of Candy Quackenbush from a dysfunctional little family in a dysfunctional little town called Chickentown, Minnesota. Candy is drawn into a fantastic new world of adventure and strangeness called the Abarat. Yet, as strange as this world is, it also seems more and more familiar to her....

_By the way, if you think that not too much of importance will happen in the second volume of a four volume series, you would be wrong- dead wrong. As a matter of fact, so many important characters died in this book that I briefly wondered if there would be a volume three. The conclusion is so operatically spectacular that I cannot imagine Barker topping it when he concludes the series.

_The author also further develops the metaphysics of his vision here. From what I can tell his inspiration is primarily drawn from Plato. Actually, the Abarat comes across as one of the infinite levels of the astral plane- but one that is coming unglued and increasingly under the influence of dark forces. In any case, I found it a satisfying vision.

_Like the original volume this book is a top quality production in every respect: illustrations, typesetting, paper quality, end papers, covers, dust cover, etc., etc., etc.
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