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eBook No Chinese Stranger (1st Edition) epub

by Deng Ming-Dao,Jade Snow Wong

eBook No Chinese Stranger (1st Edition) epub
  • ISBN: 0060147326
  • Author: Deng Ming-Dao,Jade Snow Wong
  • Genre: Travel
  • Subcategory: Asia
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harper & Row; 1st edition (1975)
  • Pages: 366 pages
  • ePUB size: 1920 kb
  • FB2 size 1688 kb
  • Formats lit lrf txt azw


I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in China and the social history of San Francisco, and most of all of the family of Jade Snow Wong. This is a marvelous book and I only wish it was back in print.

by. Jade Snow Wong (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in China and the social history of San Francisco, and most of all of the family of Jade Snow Wong. If you are planning a trip to Beijing, please try t find this book and take it with you.

com: No Chinese Stranger: HARDCOVER Legendary independent bookstore online since 1994. Title: No Chinese Stranger. Publisher: HARPERCOLLINS PUBLISHERS. Reliable customer service and no-hassle return policy. Bookseller Inventory 17978006014732700.

ISBN 13: 9780060147327.

Books by Jade Snow Wong. by Jade Snow Wong and Deng Ming-Dao.

No Chinese Stranger book. The continuance of Jade Snow Wong's life adventure after her early years covered in her work 'Fifth Chinese Daughter'. Synopsis: Wong's career in pottery took off after she was fortunate enough to have a merchant on Grant Avenue in Chinatown, San Francisco, put her workshop in his store window.

Jade Snow Wong (1975), No Chinese Stranger, illustrated by Deng Ming-Dao, New York: Harper & Ro.

Jade Snow Wong (1975), No Chinese Stranger, illustrated by Deng Ming-Dao, New York: Harper & Row. Critical studies. The Oriental/Occidental Dynamic in Chinese American Life Writing: Pardee Lowe and Jade Snow Wong By: Madsen, Deborah . can Studies, 2006; 51 (3): 343-53.

By (author) Jade Snow Wong. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Format Book 366 pages.

80 beğenme · 822 kişi bunun hakkında konuşuyor. What’s wrong with being happy? Buddha said all was suffering. Taoists and Buddhists alike declare that all is illusion. The master warn us against pleasure Daha Fazla.

1st ed. by Jade Snow Wong. Published 1975 by Harper & Row in New York. Description and travel.

Wong's career in pottery took off after she was fortunate enough to have a merchant on Grant Avenue in Chinatown, San Francisco, put her workshop in his store window.[6] Her ceramics were later displayed in art museums across the United States, including a 2002 exhibition at the Chinese Historical Society of America.[7] They were also displayed at the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago (a one-woman show), the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC, and the Cincinnati Art Museum, as well as shows in Omaha, Nebraska, and Portland, Oregon. In addition to these shows across the United States, Wong's ceramics have also been placed in the permanent collections of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Detroit Institute of Arts, and the International Ceramic Museum in Faenza, Italy.
Comments: (2)
Twentyfirstfinger
No Chinese Stranger carries on with the exceptionally intersting life of Jade Snow Wong. The book covers three phases of her life taking up from where 5th Chinese Daughter left off. We read of her efforts to establish herself in a shop and the problems she had to resolve before she was able to share a portion of a window in a shop owned by another. We also learn of her courtship and marriage. Her style fo raising her four children. We also see a dramatic change in writing style when we read of the death of Mrs. Wong's father. There is a switch from third to first person writing styles.

We also accompany Mrs. Wong and her husband on as she tours and lectures through Southeast Asia. This was the Southeast Asia of the early 1950s where colonies were in the process of converting to self-ruling nations and the resultant problems which they were experiencing. This trip was done at the behest and sponsership of the US State Department. What is illuminating was that prior to her departure, Mrs. Wong recieved no briefing from the State Department and her only real contact with the policy making experts was at the end of her trip when she went to Washington to be debriefed. One country she did not visit was Vietnam. When she gave her report to the State Department, the Vietnam desk asked why she hadn't gone to that country. The fact that she wasn't asked to is illustrative of future problems in that part of the world.

The book continues with her visit to China with her husband shortly after the historic visit by Richard Nixon to China. The description of her trip, her meeting with family members residing in China and her contacts with government officials is exceptionally well presented. Remember, few Americans had been to China officially and it was a learning experience for all concerned. The problems encountered in the trip are quite educational for those contemplaiting a visit to China. It was extremely fortunate that Mrs. Wong was able to travel with her husband for the assistance and advice he provided. By this time, they had become deeply involved in the travel industry and had made numerous trips to Asia outside of China. This experience served them well in their travels through China.

Throughout the book, there are constant references to her family. Her children, even when she is marveling at the sights in Beijing, are never far from her mind. She also writes of the changes that occurred in her and her family's lives as the years progressed. Schools integrated and in an effort to make the numbers correct - large numbers of kids were bused to schools far from thier homes. The daughter of our landlady would have gone to school four blocks from home but because of a need to balance the numbers of the different ethnicities in San Francisco she was bused several miles away to another school where she knew no one since none of her kindergarten friends were in the same class or school as she was. I can understand Mrs. Wong's frustration with the school system as it tried to be all things to all people yet was incapable of solving her particular problem with her son and his school without a great deal of repeated and wasted effort.

This is a marvelous book that offers a look at a second generation Chinese-American family as they move through the 1950s,60s and 70s. There is a revealing examiniation of China as it was evolving out of the Cultural Revolution and into a new phase of government and social styles.

Since I reviewed this book I have moved to Asia. I had the opportunity to visit Beijing and took the book along. It was a wonder tour guide supplement. In her book Mrs. Wong is describing a street side clothing repair lady. I was walking outside of my hotel (not in the center of Beijing fortunately) and when I went around the corner there was a lady at a table bundled up against the cold (it was November) with a sewing machine powered by an extension cord for another building. I wish I had had something for her to repair. This was 2005 so somethings had not changed much in the 30+ years since Mrs. Wong was walking around Beijing for the first time.

I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in China and the social history of San Francisco, and most of all of the family of Jade Snow Wong. This is a marvelous book and I only wish it was back in print. If you are planning a trip to Beijing, please try t find this book and take it with you. It is a tremendous guide to the Beijing of then and you can accurately compare the current Beijing. It may be a little expensive on the used book circuit but well worth it and it will give you a great deal of pleaseure while you are in Beijing.
Charyoll
Like the author's style of writing
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