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eBook This Is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives epub

by Ben Corbett

eBook This Is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives epub
  • ISBN: 0813342244
  • Author: Ben Corbett
  • Genre: Travel
  • Subcategory: Caribbean
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Basic Books; 1st edition (March 2004)
  • Pages: 320 pages
  • ePUB size: 1780 kb
  • FB2 size 1494 kb
  • Formats txt mobi lrf lrf


This is the summary of This Is Cuba: An Outlaw . Манхеттен Нью-Йорк - Нью-Йорк, США - Проездной тур - 4K UHD - Продолжительность: 3:40:33 GlobeTrotterAlpha.

This is the summary of This Is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives by Ben Corbett. Life in Cuba 2017 - 4K (ultra HD) - Продолжительность: 15:17 Henry James Recommended for you. 15:17. Манхеттен Нью-Йорк - Нью-Йорк, США - Проездной тур - 4K UHD - Продолжительность: 3:40:33 GlobeTrotterAlpha Recommended for you. 3:40:33. Pattaya is The Best Destination For Retirees? - Продолжительность: 15:12 AZIATKA live Recommended for you. 15:12.

Some of his features on Cuba have appeared in Salon,Tattoo Magazine, Easyriders, Fringe Golf, and Relix. He lives in Colorado. November 4, 2012) Of all the books on Cuba I read (4) this was the most immediately informative and pointed out what to watch for. The direction things were taking when Corbett wrote the book still holds. The Cubans are looking forward to even more relaxation of certain restrictive rules and policies.

Reflections of the Parallel Culture - 19. Cuba on the Fringe: A Revolution of Ink - 2. Cuba on the Fringe: A Revolution of Ink - 20. Cuba, Drugs, and the Curse of Tio Sam - 21. Sea Lane to Paradise - 22. A Legal Escape - 23. Epilogue: A Post-Castro Cuba? . Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

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The title of this book, This Is Cuba, is an expression we have in my homeland. I visited Cuba in March 1997 and have always been drawn back to books that allow me to vicariously revisit the country. Ben Corbett's book manages to walk a fine line between an admiration for Cuba (especially her people) and often stern criticism of the Castro regime. It differs, therefore, from many other books about Cuba.

Ben Corbett's nerve-center for new writing, essays and general literary salve for the post-apocalypse. This Is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives. Selected title for Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers. Offers a picture of the complex, contradictory, and chaotic island that remains the final battleground of the Cold War. – Rocky Mountain News. One of the most realistic portraits of life on that benighted island that has ever been published in America.

Now comes Ben Corbett, a thirtysomething countercultural journalist out of. .This book is so good that one hesitates to take issue with the author on points of fact. Nonetheless, he has many things wrong.

Now comes Ben Corbett, a thirtysomething countercultural journalist out of Colorado, who spent three years going back and forth, befriending Cubans from all walks of life and listening to their stories. This book tells us what he learned, and it isn't a pretty picture. Nor is Corbett particularly impressed with Cuba's perverted labor code, which requires foreign investors to hire their employees from a state agency, and turn over their entire salary to the government - which in turn disburses roughly 10 percent to the worker.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read This Is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives. Beyond the throngs of tourists streaming through Central Havana's broad Prado Avenue, and outside the yoke of Castro's 43-year-old Revolutionary program, there exists a parallel Cuba - a separate evolution of a people struggling to survive. With personal stories that depict a people torn between following the directives of their government and finding a way to better their lot, journalist Ben Corbett gives us the daily life of many considered outlaws by Castro's regime. Библиографические данные. Country of Publication.

Beyond the throngs of tourists streaming through Central Havana's broad Prado Avenue, and outside the yoke of Castro's 43-year-old Revolutionary program, there exists a parallel Cuba - a separate evolution of a people struggling to survive. With personal stories that depict a people torn between following the directives of their government and finding a way to better their lot, journalist Ben Corbett gives us the daily life of many considered outlaws by Castro's regime. But are they outlaws or rather ingenious survivors of what many Cubans consider to be a forty-year mistake, a tangle of contradictions that has resulted in a strange hybrid of American-style capitalism and a homegrown black market economy.At a time when Cuba walks precariously on the ledge between socialism and capitalism, This Is Cuba gets to the heart of this so-called outlaw culture, taking readers into the living rooms, rooftops, parks, and city streets to hear stories of frustration, hope, and survival. Updated with a new preface.
Comments: (7)
WinDImmortaL
I read this book in late 2015, and actually went to Cuba in June 2016.

I'm fluent in Spanish, so I noticed a few Spanish typos, but it wasn't a major issue.

The book is written with a distinct human theme, as opposed to reference or vacation material. I enjoyed this book so much the first time I read it, I re-read it occasionally.

The amazing thing about Cuba is that, physically, it's essentially un-changed since 1960. So although the book printed in 2006, it's still very relevant as of this review post.

If you first buy this book, and you're fortunate enough to visit Cuba, take this book with you. You'll be glad you did both.
Shakagul
This is Cuba: An Outlaw Culture Survives....because they are such an inventive and hard working people. They are do determined to survive. They love their country and it's people and they want to survive to live on and teach their culture to many others. It's an amazing book. An outstanding read, you laugh, you cry, you want to read more of the history of Cuba. I love it! Thank you, Amazon!
Trash Obsession
Although this book has been published a while ago, most of what you read still rings true. I read the book on my first trip to Cuba in the early 2000s when my colleague loaned it to me, and couldn't put it down. I experienced most of what have been illustrated in this book, directly and indirectly through the stories of Cubans I met there. Cuba is almost a moving target and things are changing constantly, but regardless of some of the critics about the concept of "outlaw culture" featured in this book, Cubans survive with all the tools and resources they can muster. I have yet to see the loose Cuban children on the street without any adult or parent accompanying them to and from schools. I wish the best for the Cuban people and I hope they never lose their dignity and a sense of self-respect even in the face of economic difficulties they may encounter.
Rainbearer
Read before you go to Havana on that long awaited and anticipated trip. An older book, true, but, somehow I don't think much has drastically changed despite what you may have read lately. People have to live and go on no matter who is in charge of their country. That's as true here as there, or anywhere for that matter.
Gralmeena
I visited Cuba in March 1997 and have always been drawn back to books that allow me to vicariously revisit the country.
Ben Corbett's book manages to walk a fine line between an admiration for Cuba (especially her people) and often stern criticism of the Castro regime. It differs, therefore, from many other books about Cuba. Corbett is no Miami based Cuban exile with a chip on his shoulder but nor is he a naïve promoter of the Communist Party government. In short, Corbett has real credibility.
From another angle, Corbett is clearly no blow in visitor who, after a week or two in the country, regards himself as some sort of expert. Instead, Corbett has visited the country on a number of occasions and for considerable lengths of time in each case. He has immersed himself in the country from a variety of perspectives and has clearly travelled widely and met a host of individuals, many of whom he now counts as friends.
It seems to me that Corbett has a love for Cuba but a distinct distaste for the regime. Yet for all this, he has no axe to grind. Far too many critical Cuba commentators are allied with the exile communities in Florida. Unfortunately, for all the errors and flaws of the regime, its hasty end may well herald the return of the exiles and a still less than positive outcome. There may be no velvet revolution.
I recommend this book to all readers interested in Cuba and its future.
Cerana
Heading for Cuba in 2 months. What an exciting time. Castro died yesterday, so who can say what it will be like. This book gives an excellent overview of history to this point. This oldish book is still relevant and best I have read in my preparations. Viva la Cuba!
Nilasida
We flew into Cuba with a group of 20 travelers the day after I finished reading Corbett's book. (November 4, 2012) Of all the books on Cuba I read (4) this was the most immediately informative and pointed out what to watch for. The direction things were taking when Corbett wrote the book still holds. The Cubans are looking forward to even more relaxation of certain restrictive rules and policies. Private business and enterprise opportunities are being expanded. The slow steady pace of Cubans embracing their own economy is good. It would be a tragedy for American capital to pour in and buy up the Cuban economy or otherwise overwhelm it. Corbett predicted more relaxation of travel restrictions for Cubans going out of their country. On January 1, 2013 travel restrictions will come down. The U.S. is also relaxing the grip of the embargo and travel by authorizing certain sponsored groups. We found it was possible to speak with Cubans and our guides very openly. We were impressed with the creative maintenance of their old American automobiles and some Russian cars and heavy trucks. The cities are notably clean and without litter. The populace is very culturally oriented and for an admission cost of one local peso can watch the best ballet. This makes taking a family affordable. We sat next to a father, his two teen daughters and eleven year old son in a box at the national ballet theater. Painters, musicians, singers are paid subsistence grants so they can do their creative work. There are some privately held galleries, restaurants and other businesses. Owning is ten taxis is forbidden, but owning two is not. Cities are dimly lighted, but we never felt vulnerable or in danger. We agree with the Cubans. Food was excellent, hotels clean and comfortable and usually historic. Toilet seats are scarce in small towns and country stops. It is time to lift the fifty year old U.S. embargo and cheer these hard working neighbors on to a better future. They about saying that that their communist political structure has not fulfilled their dreams of prosperity. There are few pictures of Fidel Castro on display in public, and we saw none of Raul Castro. On billboards and banners in the city commercial advertising is virtually non-existent. Legal travel to Cuba for Americans is opening up through U.S. foundations (l.e. Grand Circle Foundation, AAA Auto Clubs, etc.) We urge Americans to join one of these small groups and look for themselves. We understand Corbett's enthusiasm for a beautiful island.
Paul Schubert
Great insight about Cuba. After my visit to Cuba I came across this book. Worth a read.
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