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eBook The Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Czech and English Edition) epub

by Josef Krasa

eBook The Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Czech and English Edition) epub
  • ISBN: 0807610542
  • Author: Josef Krasa
  • Genre: Travel
  • Subcategory: Travel Writing
  • Language: Czech English
  • Publisher: George Braziller Inc; 1st edition (January 1, 1983)
  • Pages: 132 pages
  • ePUB size: 1514 kb
  • FB2 size 1352 kb
  • Formats lit docx doc mbr


Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his . Book Description Braziller, New York, 1983. This is a study of the plates and does not include the text of the travels of Sir John Mandeville. Seller Inventory 256595.

Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India, and China. Condition: very good. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

A Liege chronicler, Jean d'Outremeuse, tells a story of a certain Jean de Bourgogne revealing on his deathbed that his real name was Sir John Mandeville ; and in accordance with this story there is authentic record of a funeral inscription to a Sir John Mandeville in a church at Liege.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Travels of Sir John Mandeville. Text-to-Speech: Enabled. The book really picks up when whatever bunch of monks that pose as "Sir John" get past the Holy Land and its surrounding areas and visit China and Africa and just make crazy crap up by the boatload. Also some of the earliest forms of otaku-ism, since the Far East, though heathen, is only ever spoken of in great reverence.

The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, by. .

The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, by John Mandeville. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States and most other parts of the world at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.

Sir John Mandeville is the supposed author of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, a travel memoir which first circulated between 1357 and 1371. The earliest surviving text is in French.

Illustration from The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, c. 1372.

PDF Mandeville’s Travels was, for more than two centuries after its appearance in.At least 300 MSS actually survive. Just for comparison, of Marco. 356, of enormous influence and popularity in many fields o.The question of who wrote it, however, does not affect an appreciation of this.

References to crusade and conversion lessen considerably after the Mandeville narrator travels west of the Holy Land.

Jehan de Mandeville', translated as 'John Mandeville', is the name claimed by the compiler of The Travels of Sir John Mandeville . Last week, around 33,000 people downloaded books from my site - 10 people gave donations. These books can take me from 2 to 10 hours to create.

Last week, around 33,000 people downloaded books from my site - 10 people gave donations. I want to keep them free, but need some support to be able to do so. If you can, please make a small donation (the average is £. 0).

Immediately popular when it first appeared around 1356, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville became the standard account of the East for several centuriesâ?a work that went on to influence luminaries as diverse as Leonardo da Vinci, Swift, and Coleridge. Ostensibly written by an English knight, the Travels purport to relate his experiences in the Holy Land, Egypt, India, and China. Mandeville claims to have served in the Great Khan’s army and to have journeyed to “the lands beyond”â?countries populated by dog-headed men, cannibals, Amazons, and pygmies. This translation by the esteemed C.W.R.D. Moseley conveys the elegant style of the original, making this an intriguing blend of fact and absurdity, and offering wondrous insight into fourteenth-century conceptions of the world.

Includes a revised introduction, appendices, an index of place names, new notes, and updated suggestions for further reading
Comments: (5)
Grillador
The Travels of Sir John Mandeville was what we would now have called a "best-selling book" during the Middle Ages. The book was written during the mid 14th Century, a period when Europeans were becoming increasingly interested in what lay beyond the confines of world in which they lived. There is no question that the work enjoyed a wide circulation in it's day and exerted a great influence on may Europeans including, reputedly, Christopher Columbus. That fact that no such person as Sir John Mandeville ever existed, and that many of the people and places described in the book did not exist, was irrelevant.

Yes, The Travels of Sir John Mandeville was a hoax. Nevertheless, it was, arguably, one of the most famous and influential hoaxes of all time. It also remains a highly readable and entertaining travelogue of a world that certainly no longer exists today, and that mostly didn't even exist at the time the book was written. Readers who want to learn about what the world was like during the 14th Century are recommended to read Barbara Tuchman's monumental history of that era, "A Distant Mirror". However, readers who would like to understand what the people who were actually alive during the 14th Century BELEIVED that their world was like, could do far worse than to turn to the pages of "The Travels of Sir John Mandeville".
I'm a Russian Occupant
From the 13th Century and for many years after, this book was the most popular, and at the time, assumed authoritative guide to travel in Africa, the Far East, and the Biblical lands- yet "Sir John Mandeville" did not actually exist, and the presumed author, a Bendictine monk by the name of Jan de Langhe, had probably never traveled east of Ypres. To create Mandeville's story, de Langh had combined several actual travelogues together with a number of works of fantasy, such as the tales of the Kingdom of Prester John, that were well accepted in Christendom. There was just enough established or accepted fact to give the entire tale the veneer of truth.

Reading this can be difficult for modern speaker speakers; the language is archaic, the spelling unfamiliar. Sentences are of the peripatetic Biblical style of the era,tend to run on, as in this introductory passage directed at the prospective traveler: "First, if a man come from the west side of the world, as England, Ireland, Wales, Scotland, or Norway, he may, if that he will, go through Almayne and through the kingdom of Hungary, that marcheth to the land of Polayne, and to the land of Pannonia, and so to Silesia.". But for the reader who perseveres there is a great wealth of entertainment and amusement, as well as a rare glimpse into the way the rest of world was viewed from Europe in the Middle Ages.
Kefym
An interesting look at what constituted a medieval best-seller. The book really picks up when whatever bunch of monks that pose as "Sir John" get past the Holy Land and its surrounding areas and visit China and Africa and just make crazy crap up by the boatload. Also some of the earliest forms of otaku-ism, since the Far East, though heathen, is only ever spoken of in great reverence.

Definitely for a niche audience, as the detailed descriptions of furlongs and cubits are of little interest to a sustained narrative.
Talrajas
An important text regarding a 14th century european traveling east for holy pilgrimage. In the tradition of Marco Polo but often devolving into fantastic and imaginative descriptions of places, animals and people that are less than accurate. Interesting to sample the 14th century european unterstanding of the world. Note this Dover Publication version is abridged.
Mr Freeman
Great book
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